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" His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very * first order; his penetration strong, though not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Locke, and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided... "
Honor to George Washington and Reading about George Washington: Pamphlets 1 ... - Page 28
edited by - 1932 - 198 pages
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Elson Grammar School Readers, Book 3

William Harris Elson, Christine M. Keck - Basal reading instruction - 1910
...character, it should be in terms like these: His mind was great and powerful, without being of the 5 very first order; his penetration strong, though not...conclusion. Hence the common remark of his officers, of the ad10 vantage he derived from councils of war, where, hearing all suggestions, he selected whatever...
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Everybody's Cyclopedia: A Concise and Accurate Compilation of the ..., Volume 5

Charles Leonard-Stuart - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1912
...estimate of the character and intellect of the great American patriot is from President Jefferson : " His mind was great and powerful, without being of...acute as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Locke ; and, so far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided by invention...
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McEvoy Magazine, Volume 4, Issue 4

Education - 1912
...were dancing." — Written when he was a surveyor at sixteen years of age. Jefferson's Description. 4. His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very first order, as that of Xewton or Bacon or Locke, and as far as he saw no judgment was sounder. It was slow in operation,...
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American Literature Through Illustrative Readings

Sarah Emma Simons - American literature - 1915 - 463 pages
...and thoroughly, and were I called on to delineate his character, it should be in terms like these : His mind was great and powerful, without being of...imagination, but sure in conclusion. Hence the common jemark of his officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where, hearing all suggestions,...
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Everyday Classics: Sixth Reader

Franklin Thomas Baker, Ashley Horace Thorndike - Readers - 1917 - 416 pages
...his character, it should be in terms like these : His mind was great and powerful, without being of 5 the very first order; his penetration strong, though...invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion. Hence 10 the common remark of his officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where, hearing...
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Leaves of the Greater Bible: Being an Anthology of Reprints and Paraphrases ...

William Norman Guthrie - Literature - 1917 - 143 pages
...Fury comes your house to sweep !" FIRST READING, IN PRAISE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON JEFFEBSON'S TRIBUTE His mind was great and powerful without being of the...Newton, Bacon, or Locke; and, as far as he saw, no judgement was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination,...
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Everyday Classics: Eighth Reader : the Introduction to Literature

Franklin Thomas Baker, Ashley Horace Thorndike - Literature - 1919 - 415 pages
...his character, it should be in terms like these : His mind was great and powerful, without being of 5 the very first order; his penetration strong, though...invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion. Hence 10 the common remark of his officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where, hearing...
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The Elson Readers..: Book 5-8 ...

William Harris Elson - 1921
...character, it should be in terms like these: His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very s first order ; his penetration strong, though not so...of his officers, of the advantage he derived from 10 councils of war, where, hearing all suggestions, he selected whatever was best ; and certainly no...
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Report of the Maine State Bar Association for ..., Volume 22

Maine State Bar Association - Bar associations - 1921
...recreation." Jefferson's statement respecting Washington was applicable to Nathan Clifford: "His mind was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination, but he was sure in his conclusions." His associates upon the court leaned upon him more and more; and the...
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Oracles on Man and Government

John Morley - Philosophy - 1923 - 298 pages
...in any of Carlyle's splendid dithyrambs, and it is no waste of time to recall and to transcribe it : His mind was great and powerful, without being of...the common remark of his officers, of the advantage lie derived from councils of war, where, hearing all suggestions, he selected whatever was best : and...
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