Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very * first order; his penetration strong, though not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Locke, and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided... "
Honor to George Washington and Reading about George Washington: Pamphlets 1 ... - Page 28
edited by - 1932 - 198 pages
Full view - About this book

Cyclopaedia of American literature, by E. A. and G. L ..., Volume 1; Volume 85

Evert Augustus Duyckinck - 1866
...stro ig, though not so acute as that of a Newton, B:vo.i, or Locke; and as far as he saw, no judgme it was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imngination, but sure in conclusion. Hence the common remark of his officers, of the advantage he derived...
Full view - About this book

The Last Century of Universal History: A Reference Book, Containing an ...

Alexander Charles Ewald - Battles - 1868 - 621 pages
...estimates of the character and intellect of Washington is that of President Jefferson, who says, " His mind was great and powerful, without being of...and, as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. Hence the common remark of his officers of the Jan. 7, 1779 Dec. 14, 1799 BIOGBAPHICAIi NOTES. 1736...
Full view - About this book

The Life of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 3

Henry Stephens Randall - Presidents - 1868
...and thoroughly ; and were I called on to delineate his character, it should be in terms like these. His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very first order ; hia penetration strong, though not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Locke ; ano as far as...
Full view - About this book

Complete course of the French language, Volume 2

François Quesnel - 1869
...est la différence entre promener, et se promener? TRADUISEZ EN FRANÇAIS. PORTRAIT OP WASHINGTON. His mind was great and powerful, without being of...order ; his penetration strong, though not so acute J as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Locke. But he was, in every sense2 of the word, a wise, a good and...
Full view - About this book

The Domestic Life of Thomas Jefferson

Presidents - 1871 - 432 pages
...and thoroughly; and were I called on to delineate his character, it should be in terms like these: His mind was great and powerful without being of the very first order; his penetration strong, tnough not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Locke ; and, as far as he saw, no judgment was ever...
Full view - About this book

The Literary Reader: Typical Selections from Some of the Best British and ...

George Rhett Cathcart - Readers - 1874 - 426 pages
...have been the instrument of expressing, in one brief, decisive act, the con-- CHARACTER OF WASHINGTON. His mind was great and powerful, without being of...penetration strong, though not so acute as that of Newton,* Bacon,f or Locke ; \ and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation,...
Full view - About this book

Selections: In the Reporting Style of Phonography, with Key, Issue 1

Sir Isaac Pitman - Shorthand - 1877 - 48 pages
...process as long as there are any errors to be corrected. SELECTIONS. CHARACTER OF WASHINGTON. o CU His mind was great and powerful, without being of...but sure in conclusion. Hence the common remark of Ma officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where, hearing all suggestions, he selected...
Full view - About this book

The Literary Reader

George Rhett Cathcart - American literature - 1877 - 426 pages
...the visible signs of thought ; — this is the glory of Thomas Jeiferson." CHARACTER OF WASHINGTON. His mind was great and powerful, without being of...penetration strong, though not so acute as that of Newton,* Bacon,f or Locke ; J and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation,...
Full view - About this book

Appletons' School Readers

William Torrey Harris, Andrew Jackson Rickoff, Mark Bailey - Readers - 1878 - 142 pages
...dust " ; — " everlasting to everlasting " (endless past to endless future). CXX.— WASHINGTON. 1. His mind was great and powerful, without being of...and, as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. 2. It was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion....
Full view - About this book

(The British readers). The first (-sixth) reader, ed. by T. Morrison. The ...

Thomas Morrison (LL.D.) - 1878
...subordinate posts, he became President of the United States in the year 1801. He died 4th July, 1826.] His mind was great and powerful, without being of...though not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Looke ; and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF