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" National authority would render the war unnecessary, and it would at once cease. If, however, resistance continues, the war must also continue, and... "
Message of the President of the United States and Accompanying Documents - Page 16
by Abraham Lincoln (President of the United States), United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln) - 1861 - 441 pages
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ABRAHAM LINCOLN: His Life and Public Services

MRS. P. A. HANAFORD - 1866
...Congress, — an interesting document, but too long to be inserted here. . In it he remarked forcibly, "The Union must be preserved, and hence all indispensable means must be employed/7 It may be, that, even then, he was looking forward to a day when he might pronounce slavery...
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History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, Volume 3

Henry Wilson - Slavery - 1877
...the United States." Concerning the policy of freeing the slaves of Rebel owners, though saying that "the Union must be preserved, and hence all indispensable means must be employed," he added, as very clearly indicating the drift of his thought and purposes upon the subject : " We...
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Four Years in the Army of the Potomac: A Soldier's Recollections

Evan Rowland Jones - United States - 1881 - 246 pages
...Congress, in December following, the policy of emancipation was foreshadowed in these words : — " The Union must be preserved, and hence all indispensable means must be employed." On the 6th of March, 1862, he suggested to Congress the wisdom of offering pecuniary aid to such slaveholding...
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The Political History of the United States of America, During the Great ...

Edward McPherson - United States - 1882 - 655 pages
...matter of perfectly free choice with them. In the annual message last December. I thought fit to say, "the Union must be preserved; and hence all indispensable means must be employed." 1 said this not hastily, but deliberately. War has been mnde, and continues to be an indispensable...
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The Life and Public Services of James G. Blaine: With Incidents, Anecdotes ...

Russell H. Conwell - Politicians - 1884 - 504 pages
...providence as well as the obligations of law, instead of transcending I have adhered to the act of Congress to confiscate property used for insurrectionary...and hence all indispensable means must be employed." Gen. Halleck, who is no less a lawyer than a military chieftain, has deliberately expressed the opinion...
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The Life and Public Services of James G. Blaine: With Incidents, Anecdotes ...

Russell H. Conwell - Booksellers and bookselling - 1884 - 504 pages
...providence as well as the obligations of law, instead of transcending I have adhered to the act of Congress to confiscate property used for insurrectionary...will be duly considered. The Union must be preserved, and-hence all indispensable means must be employed." Gen. Halleck, who is no less a lawyer than a military...
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BIOGRAPHIES OF S. GROVER CLEVELAND AND THOMAS A. HENDRICKS

GEN'L BENJAMIN LA FEVRE - 1884
...of perfectly free choice with them. " In the annual message last December, I thought fit to say, * the Union must be preserved; and hence all indispensable means must be employed/ I said this not hastily, but deliberately. War has been made, and continues to be an indispensable...
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The Great Conspiracy: Its Origin and History

John Alexander Logan - Lincoln-Douglas Debates, Ill., 1858 - 1886 - 810 pages
...fit. "I agreed with you in the remarks contained in the Message accompanying the Resolution, that ' the Union must be preserved, and hence all indispensable means must be employed. * * * War has been and continues to be an indispensable means to this end. A practical reacknowledg--...
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Political Discussions, Legislative, Diplomatic, and Popular, 1856-1886

James Gillespie Blaine - United States - 1887 - 525 pages
...of prudence as well as the obligations of law, instead of transcending I have adhered to the act of Congress to confiscate property used for insurrectionary...and hence all indispensable means must be employed." General Halleck, who is no less a lawyer than a military chieftain, has deliberately expressed the...
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Political Discussions, Legislative, Diplomatic, and Popular, 1856-1886

James Gillespie Blaine - United States - 1887 - 525 pages
...of prudence as well as the obligations of law, instead of transcending I have adhered to the act of Congress to confiscate property used for insurrectionary...and hence all indispensable means must be employed." General Halleck, who is no less a lawyer than a military chieftain, has deliberately expressed the...
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