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" AM to-day could lead to no good. I will state, however, general, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself; and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their... "
The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States ... - Page 744
by Horace Greeley - 1866
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Our Country: A Household History for All Readers, from the ..., Volume 3

Benson John Lossing - United States - 1878 - 722 pages
...a meeting for such a purpose would be useless. " The terms upon which peace can be had," he said, " are well understood. By the South laying down their...hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed." In the meantime Sheridan had settled the question, and rendered further parley unnecessary. He stood...
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Stories, Sketches and Speeches of General Grant at Home and Abroad: In Peace ...

James Baird McClure - 1879 - 250 pages
...to no good. I will state, however, General, that I anx equally anxious for peace with yourself; and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms...may be settled without the loss of another life, I subscribemyself, etc. US GRANT, Lieutenant-General ',. After transmitting this letter, General Grant...
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The "Ulster Guard" (20th N. Y. State Militia) and the War of the Rebellion ...

Theodore Burr Gates - New York (State) - 1879 - 656 pages
...GORDON TO CUT HIS WAY THROUGH. [1865. Oeneral, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms...Seriously hoping that all our difficulties may be ended, without the loss of another life, I subscribe myself, &c." Evidently General Grant did not propose...
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General U. S. Grant: His Early Life and Military Career, with a Brief ...

Julian K. Larke - United States - 1879 - 512 pages
...however, General, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself; and the whole North entertain the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be...hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed. Sincerely hoping that all our difficulties may be settled without the loss of another life, I subscribe...
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The National Memorial Volume: Being a Popular Descriptive Portraiture of the ...

Richard Miller Devens - United States - 1879 - 680 pages
...of peace. On the ninth, Grant wrote that he had no authority to grant such an interview. He said : " The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood....hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed." In taking the ground that he did in thia correspondence, Grant acted expressly in accordance with the...
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Papers of the Historical Society of Delaware, Issues 1-5

Historical Society of Delaware - Delaware - 1879 - 652 pages
...equally anxious for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms on which peace can be had are well understood. By the...property not yet destroyed. Seriously hoping that our difficulties may be settled without the loss of another life, I subscribe myself, etc., "'US GRANT,...
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Stories, Sketches and Speeches of General Grant at Home and Abroad: In Peace ...

James Baird McClure - 1879 - 260 pages
...to no good. I will state, however, General, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself; and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms...desirable event, save thousands of human lives, and hunqreds of millions of property not yet destroyed. Seriously hoping that all our difficulties may...
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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union ...

United States. War Department - Confederate States of America - 1880
...to no good. I will state, however, general, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms...destroyed. Seriously hoping that all our difficulties may he settled without the loss of another life, I subscribe myself, &c., US GRANT, Lieutenant-General....
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Military History of Ulysses S. Grant: From April, 1861, to April, 1865, Volume 3

Adam Badeau - United States - 1881
...with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can he liad are well understood. By the South laying down their...without the loss of another life, I subscribe myself, etc., US Grant, Lieutenant-General." He then set out to join Sheridan's column, and to hasten the emergency...
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The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Volume 2

Jefferson Davis - Confederate States of America - 1881 - 882 pages
...be accepted." When General Lee asked the same question, on April 9, 1865, General Grant replied : " The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood....hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed." When General Sherman made an agreement with General Johnston for formal disbandment of the army of...
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