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" One-eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was somehow the cause of... "
The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln ...: Together with His State ... - Page 645
by Henry Jarvis Raymond - 1865 - 808 pages
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The History of Abraham Lincoln, and the Overthrow of Slavery

Isaac N. Arnold - Dummies (Bookselling) - 1866 - 720 pages
...parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the Nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish,...interest, was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union by war, while the Government claimed no right to do more than to restrict the...
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Key-notes of American Liberty: Comprising the Most Important Speeches ...

Slavery - 1866 - 273 pages
...one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive ; and the other would rather accept war than let it perish, and the war came. One-eighth of...interest, was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union even by war, while the Government claimed no right to do more than to restrict...
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KEY-NOTES OF AMERICAN LIBERTY;

1866
...one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive; and the other would rather accept war than let it perish, and the war came. One-eighth of...interest, was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union even by war, while the Government claimed no right to do more than to restrict...
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THE REBELLION REGISTER:

ROBERT A CAMPBELL - 1866
...rather than let the nation survive ; and the other would accept war rather than let it perish, and j>he war came. One-eighth of the whole population were...interest, was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union, av@n by war, wkile the Crovernment claimed no right to to do more than to restrict...
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THE LIFE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN

J.G. HOLLAND - 1866
...survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish ; and the war came. " One eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed...interest, was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union even by war, while the government claimed no right to do more than to restrict...
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Life of Abraham Lincoln

Josiah Gilbert Holland - LINCOLN, ABRAHAM, 1809-1865 - 1866 - 544 pages
...nation survive, and the other would accept war rather thin let it perish; and the war came. " One eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed...and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was1 somehow the cause of the war. To strengthen, perpetuate and extend this interest, was the object...
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THE AMERICAN CONFLICT: A HISTORY OF THE GREAT REBELLION IN THE UNITED STATES ...

HORACE GREELEY - 1866
...rather than let the nation survive; and the other would accept war rather than let it perish—and the war came. One-eighth of the whole population were...part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and beneficial interest. All knew that this interest was somehow the cause of the war. To strengthen, perpetuate,...
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ABRAHAM LINCOLN: His Life and Public Services

MRS. P. A. HANAFORD - 1866
...parties deprecated war; but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish ;...slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but located in the Southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All...
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THE AMERICAN CONFLICT: A HSTORY OF THE GREAT REBELLION

HORACE GREELEY - 1866
...Union, but localized in the Southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and beneficial interest. All knew that this interest was somehow...this interest was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union even by war; while the Government claimed no right to do more than to restrict...
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The Freedman's Third Reader

American Tract Society (Boston, Mass.) - Freedmen - 1866 - 264 pages
...of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but located in the southern part of it. These slaves constituted...that this interest was somehow the cause of the war. 3. If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses, which, in the providence of...
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