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" The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government, and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force... "
HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR - Page 16
by JOHN WILLIAM DRAPER - 1868
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Father Abraham: Lincoln's Relentless Struggle to End Slavery

Richard Striner - History - 2006 - 320 pages
...defended. But Fort Sumter was in peril. Lincoln, in the course of his inaugural address, had made a promise to "hold, occupy, and possess the property, and places belonging to the government. . . ,"97 So what was to be done about Sumter? Lincoln asked for the advice of his top-ranking military...
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Common Soldier: A Civil War Saga

Paul K. Cashdollar - Fiction - 2006
...institution of slavery. He also said he would support the perpetuity of the Union against secession and would "hold, occupy and possess the property and places belonging to the government." About one month later, Lincoln sent a letter to Major Anderson, commander of Fort Sumter in Charleston...
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Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years and the War Years

Carl Sandburg - Biography & Autobiography - 2007 - 463 pages
...there shall be none, unless it be forced upon the national authority. The power confided to me, will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property,...government, and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion — no using offoree...
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Broken Government: How Republican Rule Destroyed the Legislative, Executive ...

John Wesley Dean - Political Science - 2007 - 332 pages
...vision, it was the president's duty to keep the government operating: "The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property...the Government and to collect the duties and imposts — The mails, unless repelled, will continue to be furnished in all parts of the Union. So far as...
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The Politically Incorrect Guide to The South: (And Why It Will Rise Again)

Clint Johnson - History - 2007 - 288 pages
...the same speech, Lincoln made it very clear what would provoke war: "The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property...Government and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force against...
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Beleaguered Winchester: A Virginia Community at War, 1861-1865

Richard R. Duncan - History - 2007 - 380 pages
...formation of a Confederate government compounded their problems. The president's promise to use his power "to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places...belonging to the Government, and to collect the duties on imposts" forced Unionists to answer charges that his words were a declaration of war. Disavowing...
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Cry Havoc!: The Crooked Road to Civil War, 1861

Nelson D. Lankford - History - 2007 - 308 pages
...because he had spoken plainly in his inaugural address. He then quoted to them from it about his intent to "hold, occupy, and possess, the property, and places belonging to the Government." This was a bit disingenuous, because the clarity of that point was obscured by conciliatory passages...
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Abraham Lincoln, a Man of Faith and Courage: Stories of Our Most Admired ...

Joe Wheeler - Biography & Autobiography - 2008 - 256 pages
...be faithfully executed in all the states!'" When he continued on with "The power confided in me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government," a great wave of enthusiasm rolled through the audience, "as the united voices of the immense multitude...
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Lincoln's Legacy: Ethics and Politics

Phillip Shaw Paludan - Biography & Autobiography - 2008 - 85 pages
...obligations. One was his solemn oath to "preserve, protect, and defend" the Union, to which end he promised to "hold, occupy and possess the property and places belonging to the Government," of which Fort Sumter was by all means the most important. The other moral obligation was his promise...
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