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" ... a specious and fantastic arrangement of words, by which a man can prove a horse-chestnut to be a chestnut horse. I will say here, while upon this subject, that I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery... "
Great Debates in American History: State rights (1798-1861); slavery (1858-1861) - Page 128
edited by - 1913
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The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858

Abraham Lincoln, Stephen Arnold Douglas - Illinois - 1908 - 698 pages
...institution of slavery and the black race. This is the whole of it; and anything that argues me into his idea of perfect social and political equality with...can prove a horse-chestnut to be a chestnut horse. [Laughter.] ^ I will say here, while upon this subject, that I have no purpose, directly or indirectly,...
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Stephen A. Douglas: a Study in American Politics

Allen Johnson - United States - 1908 - 428 pages
...social and political equality of the black and white races, he said, ''Anything that argues me into his idea of perfect social and political equality with...can prove a horse-chestnut to be a chestnut horse. . . .1 have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and the black races....
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An Anthology of the Epigrams and Sayings of Abraham Lincoln, Collected from ...

Abraham Lincoln - 1908 - 78 pages
...Haven, Conn., Mar. 6, 1860, vol. V , p. 343. CHESTNUT HORSE ARGUMENT Anything that argues me into his idea of perfect social and political equality with...can prove a horse-chestnut to be a chestnut horse. Reply at Ottawa Debate, Aug. 21, 1858, vol. III, p. 229. SLAVERY FOUNDED IN SELFISHNESS Slavery is...
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Abraham Lincoln: A Documentary Portrait Through His Speeches and Writings

Abraham Lincoln, Don Edward Fehrenbacher - History - 1977 - 292 pages
...that he is my brother or any kin to me whatever. LINCOLN AT OTTAWA: Anything that argues me into his idea of perfect social and political equality with...fantastic arrangement of words, by which a man can prove a horse chestnut to be a chestnut horse. [Laughter.] I will say here, while upon this subject, that I...
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The Historian's Lincoln: Pseudohistory, Psychohistory, and History

Gabor S. Boritt, Norman O. Forness - History - 1996 - 486 pages
...charges that he favored perfect political and social equality between the races, Lincoln continued, was but "a specious and fantastic arrangement of words, by which a man can prove a horse chestnut to be a chestnut horse." Also at Ottawa Lincoln thanked Douglas for calling him "kind,...
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Abraham Lincoln: Speeches and Writings Vol. 1 1832-1858 (LOA #45)

Abraham Lincoln - History - 1989 - 946 pages
...institution of slavery or the black race, and this is the whole of it; and anything that argues me into his idea of perfect social and political equality with the negro is but a specious and fantastical arrangement of words by which a man can prove a horse-chestnut to be a chestnut horse....
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Conflict and Compromise: The Political Economy of Slavery, Emancipation and ...

Roger L. Ransom - Business & Economics - 1989 - 340 pages
...Politics, p. 161. 61 Ibid., pp. 161-}. As to emancipation, Lincoln tried to make it clear that he had "no purpose, either directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery where it exists." Yet he left little doubt that he believed in the right of blacks eventually to be...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 111

English literature - 1862 - 602 pages
...unreserved and unqualified manner. In his inaugural address he solemnly declared — ' I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution...exists ; I believe I have no lawful right to do so. Those who nominated and elected me did so with a full knowledge that I had made this and many similar...
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Lincoln, Douglas, and Slavery: In the Crucible of Public Debate

David Zarefsky - History - 1993 - 324 pages
...her for a wife." In the Ottawa debate, he proclaimed that "anything that argues me into [Douglas's] idea of perfect social and political equality with...fantastic arrangement of words, by which a man can prove a horse chestnut to be a chestnut horse." Most explicitly, at Charleston, he declared, "I am not, nor...
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Methods of Rhetorical Criticism: A Twentieth-century Perspective

Bernard L. Brock, Robert Lee Scott, James W. Chesebro - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 524 pages
...oath prescribed by the Constitution of the United Sates ..." Again he observes, "I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists"; "I now reiterate these sentiments"; "I take the official oath to-day, with no mental reservations";"Kou...
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