Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American, the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.... "
The R.I. Schoolmaster - Page 203
1861
Full view - About this book

Abridgment of the Debates of Congress, from 1789 to 1856: Feb. 11, 1828 ...

United States. Congress, Thomas Hart Benton - Law - 1859 - 776 pages
...the consolidation of oar Union — in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety ; perhaps our national existence. This important consideration,...and deeply impressed on our minds, led each State in we convention to be less rigid, on points of inferior magnitude, than might have been otherwise expected."...
Full view - About this book

Teachings of Patriots and Statesmen: Or, The "founders of the Republic" on ...

Ezra B. Chase - Slavery - 1860 - 558 pages
...the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps onr national existence. This important consideration,...led each State in the Convention to be less rigid in points of inferior magiiitnde than might have been otherwise expected. And thus the Constitution...
Full view - About this book

The Danville Quarterly Review, Volume 3

Presbyterian church in the U.S.A. - 1863 - 716 pages
...consolidation of our Union, — in which is involved onr prosperity, felicity, safety, — perhaps our national existence. This important consideration,...present, is the result of a spirit of amity and of mutual deference and concession, which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered indispensable."t...
Full view - About this book

The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of ..., Volume 5

Jonathan Elliot - Constitutional history - 1861 - 686 pages
...impressed on our minds, led each state in the Convention to be less rigid in points of inferior magriitude than might have been otherwise expected. And thus...we now present is the result of a spirit of amity, anil of that mutual deference and concession, which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered...
Full view - About this book

American Dis-union: Constitutional Or Unconstitutional?: A Reply to Mr ...

Charles Edward Rawlins - Secession - 1862 - 252 pages
...perhaps, our national existence. This important consideration, seriously and deeply impressed upon our minds, led each State in the Convention to be...magnitude than might have been otherwise expected — a spirit of amity and of that mutual deference and concession which the peculiarity of our political...
Full view - About this book

North and South

Hiram Fuller - United States - 1863 - 352 pages
...American—the consolidation of our union—in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence. This important consideration,...which we now present is the result of a spirit of unity, and of that mutual deference and concession, which the peculiarity of our political situation...
Full view - About this book

Commentaries on the Constitutions and Laws, Peoples and History, of the ...

Ezra Champion Seaman - Constitutional history - 1863 - 312 pages
...safety, perhaps our national existence. This important consideration, seriously and deeply impressed upon our minds, led each state in the convention to be...present, is the result of a spirit of amity, and of the mutual deference and concession which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered indispensible....
Full view - About this book

The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of ..., Volume 1

Jonathan Elliot - Constitutional law - 1863 - 548 pages
...seriously and deeply impressed on our minds, led each state, in the Convention, to be less rigid, in points of inferior magnitude, than might have been...the result of a spirit of amity, and of that mutual defet ence and concession which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered indispensable....
Full view - About this book

A Voice from the Motherland: Answering Mrs. H. Beecher Stowe's Appeal

Civis Anglicus (pseud.) - United States - 1863 - 64 pages
...lay the only hope of the Constitution being permanent. In his famous letter, Washington truly says, " The Constitution which we now present is the result...concession which the peculiarity of our political position rendered indispensable." The events during and following their war for independence had not...
Full view - About this book

The Military Laws of the United States: Relating to the Army, Volunteers ...

John F. Callan, United States - Military law - 1863 - 912 pages
...the consolidation of our Union ; in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety — perhaps our national existence. This important consideration,...our minds, led each state in the convention to be lees rigid on points of inferior magnitude than might have l>eon otherwise expected ; and thus the...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF