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" The nation which indulges towards another an habitual hatred, or an habitual fondness, is in some degree a slave. It is a slave to its animosity or to its affection, either of which is sufficient to lead it astray from its duty and its interest. "
Handbook of the Administrations of the United States - Page 21
by Edward Griffin Tileston - 1871 - 222 pages
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The Boisterous Sea of Liberty: A Documentary History of America from ...

David Brion Davis, Steven Mintz - History - 1998 - 608 pages
...inveterate antipathies against particular nations and passionate attachments for others should be excluded The Nation, which indulges towards another an habitual...sufficient to lead it astray from its duty and its interest — Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence... the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly...
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Presidential Documents: The Speeches, Proclamations, and Policies that Have ...

Fred L. Israel, Jim F. Watts, Thomas J. McInerney - History - 2000 - 396 pages
...of them just and amicable feelings toward all should be cultivated. The nation which indulges toward another an habitual hatred or an habitual fondness...to lead it astray from its duty and its interest. Antipathy in one nation against another disposes each more readily to offer insult and injury, to lay...
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Democracy in America

Alexis de Tocqueville - History - 2000 - 778 pages
...habitual hatred, or 19 [Marshall, The Life of George Washington (London, 1807), Vol. V, pp. 776 ff.] an habitual fondness, is in some degree a slave. It is a slave to its animosity or to its affection. . . .>'2 Washington's political conduct was always guided by these maxims. He succeeded in keeping...
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Colonial Constitutionalism: The Tyranny of United States' Offshore ...

E. Robert Statham - Political Science - 2002 - 159 pages
...of them just and amicable feelings toward all should be cultivated. The nation which indulges toward another an habitual hatred or an habitual fondness...to lead it astray from its duty and its interest. . . . The government sometimes participates in national propensity, and adopts through passions what...
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Foreign in a Domestic Sense: Puerto Rico, American Expansion, and the ...

Christina Duffy Burnett, Burke Marshall, Gilbert M. Joseph, Emily S. Rosenberg - History - 2001 - 422 pages
...of them just and amicable feelings toward all should be cultivated. The nation which indulges toward another an habitual hatred or an habitual fondness...animosity or to its affection, either of which is suff1cient to lead it astray from its duty and its interest. . . . The government sometimes participates...
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The Dawn Of Universal History: Selected Essays From A Witness To The ...

Raymond Aron - Philosophy - 2009 - 554 pages
...defensive posture, we may safely trust to temporary alliances for extraordinary emergencies. . . . The Nation, which indulges towards another an habitual...to lead it astray from its duty and its interest. Not to get involved In quarrels between European states—that was good advice to a young republic...
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American Presidents: Farewell Messages to the Nation, 1796-2001

Gleaves Whitney - Political Science - 2003 - 477 pages
...feelings toward all should be cultivated. The nation which indulges toward another a habitual hatred or a habitual fondness is in some degree a slave. It is...to lead it astray from its duty and its interest. Antipathy in one nation against another disposes each more readily to offer insult and injury, to lay...
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The Second World War: Asia and the Pacific

Thomas B. Buell, John H. Bradley, Thomas E. Griess, Jack W. Dice - History - 2002 - 352 pages
...371383. China-BurmaIndia: The War for East Asia 9 The nation which indulges toward another an hahitual hatred or an habitual fondness is in some degree a...affection, either of which is sufficient to lead it away from its duty and its interests. George Washington's Farewell Address After World War I the United...
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Nixon Agonistes: The Crisis of the Self-made Man

Garry Wills - Biography & Autobiography - 2002 - 617 pages
...South Vietnam?] should be excluded." Washington's text argues that "the nation which indulges toward another an habitual hatred or an habitual fondness is in some degree a slave." The plight of America, at the mercy of either Saigon or Hanoi, or of both at the same time, is a perfect...
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Democracy in America

Alexis de Tocqueville - Political Science - 2003 - 703 pages
...emergencies.' In a previous part of the same letter Washington makes the following admirable and just remark: 'The nation which indulges towards another an habitual...to lead it astray from its duty and its interest.' The political conduct of Washington was always guided by these maxims. He succeeded in maintaining...
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