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" That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively... "
History of the Administration of President Lincoln - Page 113
by Henry Jarvis Raymond - 1864 - 8 pages
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Lincoln's Sacred Effort: Defining Religion's Role in American Self-government

Lucas E. Morel - History - 2000 - 251 pages
...inclination to do so."49 This was the same course announced in the 1860 Republican platform, which read: That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the...according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of powers on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depends; and we...
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Modernization as Ideology: American Social Science and "nation Building" in ...

Michael E. Latham - Political Science - 2000 - 288 pages
...of 186o directly addressed southern concerns, advocating "the maintenance inviolate of the rights of States, and especially the right of each state to order and control its own domestic institutions," while condemning any "lawless invasion" of a state or territory "as among the gravest of crimes." Republican...
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A Nation of States: Federalism at the Bar of the Supreme Court

Kermit L. Hall - Law - 2000 - 446 pages
...and Whigs, acknowledged the obligation to preserve "the rights of the States . . . inviolate . . . , and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions . . . exclusively, 'rights' essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance...
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A New Birth of Freedom: Abraham Lincoln and the Coming of the Civil War

Harry V. Jaffa - History - 2004 - 576 pages
...the fugitive slave clause of the Constitution resemble, but are not identical to, those for honoring the right of each state to order and control its own domestic institutions. In both instances it is the law of the Constitution, and fidelity to the Constitution is a sine qua...
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Lincoln of Kentucky

Lowell Harrison - History - 2000 - 305 pages
...compensated emancipation. In his 1861 inaugural address Lincoln had stressed the Republican acceptance of the right of each state "to order and control its own domestic institutions," and he reaffirmed that pledge whenever possible. Yet there were doubters in Kentucky from the start...
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A Hubert Harrison Reader

Hubert Harrison - History - 2001 - 473 pages
...first inaugural, to support his contention, he quoted from the Republican party's platform: Resolved, That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the...according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depend, and we...
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Myths in Stone: Religious Dimensions of Washington, D.C., Part 3

Jeffrey F. Meyer - Religion - 2001 - 354 pages
...the Union. He did not believe that as president he was constitutionally empowered to interfere with the "right of each State to order and control its...institutions according to its own judgment exclusively." But he did oppose any efforts to secede from the Union as equally unconstitutional. He urged caution...
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The Supreme Court in American Society: Equal Justice Under Law

Kermit L. Hall - Law - 2001 - 788 pages
...and Whigs, acknowledged the obligation to preserve "the rights of the States . . . inviolate . . . , and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions . . . exclusively, 'rights' essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance...
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Arkansas: A Narrative History

Jeannie M. Whayne, Thomas A. Deblack, Morris S. Arnold - History - 2002 - 447 pages
...resistance to the extension of slavery. Its platform also denounced John Brown's raid and recognized the right of each state "to order and control its own domestic institutions." Lincoln had already struck a moderate tone, stating his view that slavery was "an evil, not to be extended,...
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The Transcontinental Railroad: A Primary Source History of America's First ...

Gillian Houghton - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2002 - 64 pages
...imperative duty of an indignant People sternly to rebuke and forever silence. State Sovereignty. 4. That the maintenance inviolate of the Rights of the...according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depends; and we...
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