Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" I hold that, notwithstanding all this, there is no reason in the world why the negro is not entitled to all the natural rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence — the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I hold that he is... "
Great Debates in American History: State rights (1798-1861); slavery (1858-1861) - Page 128
edited by - 1913
Full view - About this book

Reconstructing the Fourth Amendment: A History of Search and Seizure, 1789-1868

Andrew E. Taslitz - Law - 2006 - 363 pages
...endowment" and was not likely to succeed in competition with free whites, nevertheless the Negro is in his "right to eat the bread, without the leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, . . . my equal and the equal of Judge Douglas and the equal of every living man." Moreover, even if...
Limited preview - About this book

Encyclopedia of U.S. Labor and Working-class History, Volume 1

Eric Arnesen - Industrial relations - 2007 - 1734 pages
...sought economic opportunity and the legal equality needed to protect their right, as Lincoln put it, "to eat the bread, without the leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns." Republicans believed that blacks could be integrated into their philosophy of free labor. In this theory,...
Limited preview - About this book

Politics and Culture of the Civil War Era: Essays in Honor of Robert W ...

Robert Walter Johannsen - History - 2006 - 366 pages
..."I agree with Judge Douglas that he [the African American] is not my equal in many respects . . . ; but in the right to eat the bread without the leave of any body else which his own hand earns, he is my equal and the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal...
Limited preview - About this book

Reading the Man: A Portrait of Robert E. Lee Through His Private Lettters

Elizabeth Brown Pryor, Robert Edward Lee - Biography & Autobiography - 2007 - 700 pages
...passions, desires, and inclinations, including the desire for self-determination. Equal, as Lincoln said, in the "right to eat the bread without the leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns. . . ." Capable, as George Washington finally realized, "of a destiny different from that in which they...
Limited preview - About this book

The American Idea: The Best of the Atlantic Monthly

Robert Vare - Social Science - 2008 - 688 pages
...Ueclaration of Independence, the right lo life, liherly and the pursuit ot happiness. | Ioud cheers.II hold that he is as much entitled to these as the white man. UNCOI N'S SREECH AT isETTYSBORi; WORKED seyeral reyolutions, heginning with one in literary style....
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF