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" It follows from these views that no State upon its own mere motion can lawfully get out of the Union ; that resolves and ordinances to that effect are legally void ; and that acts of violence, within any State or States, against the authority of the \... "
The History, Civil, Political and Military, of the Southern Rebellion: From ... - Page 7
by Orville James Victor - 1861
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Naval Campaigns of the Civil War

Paul Calore - History - 2015 - 240 pages
...Vice-President Hannibal Hamlin was also sworn in. In his inaugural address, Lincoln reminded the country that, "... no State upon its own mere motion can lawfully...insurrectionary or revolutionary, according to circumstances." Furthermore, as the leader of the country he had a solemn oath to "preserve, protect, and defend it."...
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Reassessing the Presidency: The Rise of the Executive State and the Decline ...

John V. Denson - Executive power - 2001 - 791 pages
...secession was a "most valuable, a most sacred right" of each state within the Union and proclaimed that "no state upon its own mere motion, can lawfully get out of the Union."38 Later, during the war, however, Lincoln again recognized the right of forty-nine counties...
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Abraham Lincoln: A New Birth of Freedom

Janet Benge, Geoff Benge - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2001 - 219 pages
...where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.... No state, upon its own mere motion, can lawfully get out of the Union.... I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly enjoins upon me, that the laws of the Union...
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A Child's Guide to Biography: American Men of Action

Burton Egbert Stevenson - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2001 - 390 pages
...douht. His inaugural address was earnest and direct. He said, "The union of these States is perpetual. No State upon its own mere motion can lawfully get out of the Union. I shall take care that the laws of the Union are faithfully executed in all the States." It was, in...
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Whitman Possessed: Poetry, Sexuality, and Popular Authority

Mark Maslan - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 240 pages
...of Iowa Press, 1994), 30-47. 29. In Lincoln's "First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1861," one reads: No State, upon its own mere motion, can lawfully get out of the Union . . . resolves and ordinances to that effect are legally void, and . . . acts of violence, within any...
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Crucible of Power: A History of American Foreign Relations to 1913

Howard Jones - History - 2002 - 309 pages
...about its "ultimate extinction." His central concern, as emphasized in the address, was to establish that "no State, upon its own mere motion, can lawfully get out of the Union." Political realities, of course, played a large role in Lincoln's public stance on slavery. He knew...
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Democracy--how Direct?: Views from the Founding Era and the Polling Era

Elliott Abrams - Political Science - 2002 - 134 pages
...freedom and selfgovernment. On this understanding of the country's reason for being, Lincoln declared that "no State, upon its own mere motion, can lawfully get out of the Union."29 Lincoln's position was not simply that sound principles of government do not allow the disintegration...
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Africans in the Americas Our Journey Throughout the World: The Long African ...

Sabas Whittaker, M.F.A. - History - 2003 - 368 pages
...the Union is less perfect than before the Constitution, having lost the vital element of perpetuity. It follows from these views that no State upon its...view of the Constitution and the laws the Union is unbroken, and to the extent of my ability, I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly...
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What Makes America Great?: Land of Freedom, Honor, Justice, and Opportunity

Lon Cantor - History - 2003 - 244 pages
...States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so. It follows from these views that no State, upon its...insurrectionary or revolutionary, according to circumstances. In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous question of civil...
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My Fellow Americans: The Most Important Speeches of America's Presidents ...

Political oratory - 2003 - 337 pages
...the Union is less perfect than before the Constitution, having lost the vital element of perpetuity. It follows from these views that no State upon its...insurrectionary or revolutionary, according to circumstances. "The Union is much older than the Constitution." I therefore consider that in view of the Constitution...
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