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replace it. The carpenter of my ship, Mr. Buchanan, reported very favorably as to its construction, and the fixtures, &c., for securing it.

Captain Baldwin presented requisitions for sails, rigging, and stores, all of which were promptly supplied. The boatswain took with him a number of men from the Sabine and bent the sails, and by evening all assistance needed had been rendered, and every preparation (except the shipping of the jury rudder) made for proceeding to Port Royal, whither I determined to convoy her.

On the 30th, the weather having moderated, the sea and swell subsiding, I signalled to the Vermont to “ make every possible exertion to ship the jury rudder." The Bermudas were close under our lee, the drift and currents were setting both ships bodily on them, and there were no charts on board that defined the dangerous reefs surrounding those islands. I felt great apprehensions lest I could not weather the islands, in which contingency, to escape them, it would become necessary to pass to the eastward, if that were practicable. After much delay and labor, the rudder was shipped, and before sunset the ships were happily on a course to the westward, (the rudder working well,) and at a rate per hour that carried us forty-five miles clear of the Bermudas.

On the 31st good progress was made, with further favorable reports of the working of the rudder. At 1 a. m. on the 1st the wind changed suddenly to the north west, with a severe squall, accompanied by heavy rain, which lasted until daylight. It then commenced to blow a brisk gale at northwest. The two ships separated unavoidably, and at four a. m. lost sight of each other. I cruised cautiously for two days to leeward of the position of the Vermont when last seen, and searched the part of the sea where she must have drifted in the event of any accident to or loss of the rudder. The wind was fair for Port Royal, and, knowing Captain Baldwin's desire to carry his ship, unattended, to her destination after his misfortunes, and satisfied, also, from my own experience of three days, that the jury rudder was adequate to its task, I entertained no fears but that the Vermont would safely gain the harbor of Port Royal. To have accompanied her there, after escaping and passing clear of the Bermudas, would have been simply superfluous. I therefore decided to shape my course for New York, in order to convey to the department, at the earliest moment, intelligence of the result of our labors in pursuit of the missing ship. This was promptly transmitttd through the telegraph at Sandy Hook.

I am deeply impressed with the goodness of Providence during our special mission. Heaven smiled upon our exertions, in spite of unfavorable weather and unremitting heavy gales. The ship met with no accident or injury whatever. The only painful event was the loss of an excellent man, Michael O'Brien, ordinary seaman, who, while on the lookout on the foretop gallant yard, doubtless in bis eagerness to discover the object of our search, lost his balance, and fell to the deck, fractured his skull, and expired instantly.

I am truly thankful to the officers and men of my ship for the hearty zeal they evinced during the protracted search, and their faithful co-operation in assisting to restore so fine a ship to the navy, and the officers and men of the Vermont to their anxious families and friends. In conclusion, permit me to assure you I feel highly honored that the department should have confided to my hands so interesting a duty. I am, sir, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

CADWALLADER RINGGOLD,

Captain, commanding Sabine. Hon. GIDEON WI

ELLES,
Secretary of the Nary.

Nore.--I append hereto a copy of a letter from Captain Baldwin to me, together with copies of abstract logs of Vermont and Sabine; also, of brief of occurrences and incidents on board the former since leaving Boston.

C. R.

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UNITED STATES FRIGATE SABINE,

At Sea, March 21, 1862. Sir: I beg, respectfully, to state that, in compliance with your orders, I boarded this day the brigantine Samoset, to make inquiries respecting a wreck he reported having seen the day before, and obtained the following particulars :

Captain Briggs stated that he sailed from New York on the 18th instant, bound for Leghorn; had had pleasant weather and westerly winds all the time; that on the 20th, being, as he supposed, in latitude 370 38', longitude 620, he saw, about three miles distant, a large ship with two rows of ports, and high square stern, resembling the North Carolina, heading to the northward, apparently drifting to the southward and eastward; all her lower masts, fore and main topmasto, top-gallant masts, and yards standing, her mizzen topmast and yards down; no sail set. Thought she was a steamer, as she appeared to have a smoke-stack, just forward of the main-mast; saw no smoke; had no spanker gaff; saw what he supposed to be an ensign set at the topping-lift

, near the boom; could see no indication of there being any one on board. On the 19th his latitude was 370 51', longitude 66° 10'. The following are the courses and distances made by the brigantine since leaving the vessel: East, 60 miles; N. by E. 4 E., 45 miles. Very respecefully, your obedient servant,

H. C. BLAKE,

First Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Captain CADWALLADER RINGGOLD,

Commanding Sabine.

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UNITED STATES SHIP VERMONT,
At Sea, Sunday, March 30, 1862, 11 o'clock a. m.

Latitude 33° 31' N.; longitude 64° 40' W. Dear FRIEND: As I understand your note of this morning, you desire me to endeavor to ship the jury rudder which I have ready. I am proceeding with all my means to effect that purpose, which I expect to accomplish in the space of four hours, unless the wind and sea should prevent the accomplishment of it.

I have already tried the experiment of steering with the cable veered out astern, but without success. Yesterday was the first time, after many experiments to veer the ship by her sails, that was followed by success; which suceess I impute to having a larger fore-topsail, and a favorable coincidence of wind and sea in our favor.

Let me thank you again for your kind assiduity in affording me all possible succor and assistance. Very faithfully and truly, yours,

AUG. L. BALDWIN. Captain C. RINGGOLD,

Commanding United States Frigate Sabine, in company.

Abstract of the log of the United States frigate Sabine pending the search for

the Vermont.

March 12.–6 to 8 p. m. inside of Cape Henry; at 7 o'clock p. m. got under way and proceeded to sea in tow of the United States transport steamer Baltic; wind s. by W., 2; weather, b. 8 to midnight: at 9.30 cast off the hawser from the Baltic, and the pilot left us; course E. by S.; wind S. by E., 3; weather, b.

March 13.–Commences: the Baltic in sight; course E. by S.; wind S. by E., 3; weather b. c. 4 to 8 a. m.: course till 6 o'clock NE by E., then SĖ. by S.; wind S. by E., 3; weather, 0. c.; Baltic in sight. S to meridian: hoisted the jack at the fore and fired two guns as a signal to the Baltic; hore to, and Captain Cadwallader Ringgold went on board the Baltic; course S.SE. and N.NE.; wind E., 4; weather, 0. C. Latitude by observation, 360 40' 42" N.; latitude by D. R., 36° 32' N.; longitude by chronometer, 74° 51' 45' W.; longitude by D. R., 74° 56' W. Drift

, E. n., 9 miles. Meridian to 4 p. m.: at 2.30 filled away, tacked ship, and parted company with the Baltie; course, SE., SE. by S., 3; wind E.NÈ. 4 to 8 p. m.: at 7 wore ship to the N. and E.; wind S. and E., 2 to 4. 8 to midnight: course, E.NE.; wind S. by E., 2; weather, 0. C.

March 14.—Course E. by S.; wind W., 1; weather, 0. c. 4 to S a. m: course SE. by S.; wind N. and E., 1; weather, o. f. c. 8 to meridian : course E. by S.; wind N.NE., 1; weather, 0. c. Latitude by observation, 360 15 N.; latitude by D. R., 36° 23' 24" N.; longitude by chronometer, no observation; longitude by D. R., 74° 06 45'' W. Drift.

March 14.-Meridian to 4 p. m. : course E. by S. ; wind N., 3; weather, 0.c.: 4 to 8 p. m.: course E.SE.; wind NE., 2 to 1; weather, 0. c. 8 to midnight: Wore ship to the E. ; wind E., 2; weather, 0. C.

March 15.-Course E.VE.; wind, SE., 2; weather, b. c. 4 to 8 a. m.: course E.JS.; wind S., 5; weather, b. c. At 6.10 spoke the barque James E. Ward, of and from New York, bound to Matanzas. " 8 to meridian : course E. by S.; wind S. by W., 6; weather. b. c. Latitude by observation, 36° 34' N.; latitude by D. R., 360 02' N.; longitude by chronometer, 700 26' 45;? W.; longitude by D. R., 720 18' W. Drift. Meridian to 4 p. m. : course E. by S.; wind S. by W., 5; weather, b. c. At 3 boarded the ship Union, from Calcutta, bound to Boston. 4 to 8 p. m.: course E. SE.JE; wind S., 5; weather, b. c. 8 to midnight : course E.NE.; wind S., 5; weather, b. c.

March 16.-Course E.NE.; wind S., 5; weather, 0. c. g. 4 to 8 a. m.: course E.NE.; wind S., 5; weather, 0. c. q.; strong winds and heavy sea from SW. 8 to meridian: course SE.; wind SW. by S., 6; weather, o. c.

9.

Latitude by observation, 37° 21' N.; latitude by D. R., 37° 08' N.; longitude by chronometer, 66° 09' W.; longitude by D. R., 65° 31' 30" W. Drift. Meridian to 4 p. m.: course S.SE.; wind s.sw., 5; weather, 0. c.q.

4 to 8 p. m.: course S.SE.; wind SW., 6; weather 0. c. q.; heavy sea from the SN. 8 to midnight: course S. I W.; wind W.SW., 5; weather, b. c.

March 17.—Course S.SE.; wind W.SW., 4; weather, o. c. q. 4 to 8 a. m.: course S.; wind W.SW., 4; weather, 0. c. q. 8 to meridian : course N.NE.; wind NW., 4; weather, 0. c. q. Latitude by observation, 36° 56' N.; latitude by D. R., 37° 06' N.; longitude by chronometer, 64° 47' W.; longitude by D. R., 65° 26' W. Drift. Meridian to 4 p. m.: course N. NE.; wind NW. by W., 4; weather, o. c.q.; passed several floating pieces of wreck. 4 to 8 p. m..

p course N.NE. ; wind NW. by W., 4; weather, 0. c. q. 8 to midnight : course N.NE.; wind NW. by W., 5; weather, 0. c. q.

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March 18.—Course NE. by N.; wind NW., 6; weather, 0. c. q. 4 to 8 a. m.: course N.NE.; wind NW., 6; weather, o. c. q.; a large steamer astern standing toward us. 8 to meridian: course N.NE.; wind NW., 4; weather, 00; spoke the United States transport Baltic; at 10 a. m. she went out of sight to the NW.; it was too rough to board her, and she had written on her starboard wheel-house, “ Have seen nothing” Latitude by observation, none; latitude by D. R., 38° 08' N.; longitude by chronometer, none; longitude by D. R., 63° 40' W. Meridian to 4 p. m.: course N.NE.; wind NW. by N., 4; weather, o. c. q.; heavy gales with violent squalls of hail; a sail four points on starboard bow, standing to the eastward ; passed several pieces of wreck; sent all the shot below in the lockers. 4 to 8 p. m.: course N.NE.; wind NW., 6 to 8; weather, 0. c. q. r.; heavy squalls. 8 to midnight : course NE. by N.; wind NW. by W., 6; weather, 0. c. q. r.; heavy squalls.

March 19.-Course NE. by E.; wind N., 5; weather, 0. c. q. 4 to 8 a. m.: course NE.; wind NW., 4; weather, o. c. q.; bent fore storm staysail. 8 to meridian : course NE.; wind NW., 4; weather, b. c.; saw a large ship standing to the eastward. Meridian to 4 p. m.: Course NE.; wind NW. by N., 4; weather, b. c.; Michael O'Brien (o. s.) while on the lookout fell from the fore top-gallant yard, struck on deck, and was killed instantly. Latitude by observation, 40° 25' N.; latitude by D. R., 38° 40' N.; longitude by chronometer, 60° 52' W.; longitude by D. R., 62° 23' W. Drift. 4 to 8 p. m.: course S.SW.; wind W.NW., 5; weather, b. c. 8 to midnight: course W. by S.;. wind NW., 4; weather, 0. c. q.

March 20.—Course W.SW.; wind NW., 4; weather, 0. c. q.; a sail in sight. 4 to 8 a. m.: course SW.; wind NW., 4; weather, 0. c. 8 to meridian : course SW.; wind NW., 4; weather, 0. c.; passed a Sardinian barque, bound to the southward and eastward ; several pieces of small spars floating by. Latitude by observation, 38° 24' 34" N.; latitude by D. R., 39° 04' N.; longitude by chronometer, 61° 19' W.; longitude by D. R., 61° 11' W. Meri-dian to 4 p. m.: course S.SW.; wind NW., 4; weather, 0. C. q.; at 1 p. m. called all hands to bury the dead,” half masted the ensign, the burial service was read, and the remains of Michael O'Brien, (o. s.,) were consigned to the deep. 4 to 8 p. m.: course S.SW.; wind NW., 4; weather, c. q. 8 to midnight: course W.; wind NW. by W., 2; weather, 0. c.

March 21.-Course NW.; wind NE. by N., 1; weather, 0. c. 4 to 8 a. m.: course NW.; wind NE., 3; weather, 0. c. 8 to meridian : course S.SW. and W.; wind E.NE., 3; weather, 0. c.; kept off to secure the fore truss band, which had slipped; a sail reported. Latitude by observation, none; latitude by D. R., 37° 51' N.; longitude by chronometer, none.; longitude by D. R.,. 629 W. Meridian to 4 p. m. : course W.SW.; wind E.SE., 3; weather, 0. C.; boarded the herm. brig Samoset, three days from New York, bound up the straits ; reported having seen a wreck. 4 to 8 p. m.: course W.SW.; wind E.SE, 3; weather, o. c. 8 to midnight: course SW. by W.; wind south, 4; weather, 0. C. r.

March 22.—Course W. by N.; wind S.SW., 3; weather, 0. c. r. 4 to 8 a. m.: course W.NW.; wind SW., 3; weather, 0. c. r.; at 8, wore ship to the southward and eastward. 8 to meridian : course SE. by S.; wind SW., 4; weather, o. c. 1.

Latitude by observation, none; latitude by D. R., 37° 37' N.: longitude by chronometer, none; longitude by D. R., 62° 43' W. Meridian to 4 p. m: course S.SE.; wind SW., 4; weather, 0. C. r. 4 to 8 p. m.: course S.SE.; wind SW., 4; weather, 0. c. r. 8 to midnight : course S.SE.; wind SW., 4; weather, b. c.

March 23.—Course S. by E. ; wind SW., 4; weather, b. c. 4 to 8 a. m.: course till 5.30 S. by E., then NW. by W.; wind SW., weather, b. c.; at

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5.30 made sail to double reefed topsails, reefed courses, and jib; wore ship. $ to meridian : course NW., 4 to 5; wind SW. by W., 5; weather, 0. C. Latitude by observation, 36° 36' N.; latitude by D. R., 37° 48' N.; longitude by chronometer, 63° 08' W.; longitude by D. R., 62° 47' W. Drift. Meridian to 4 p. m.; course NW.; wind SW., 5; weather, 0. c. r.; at 2.30 a schooner reported standing to the SE. 4 to 8 p. m.: course NW. by N.; wind SW., 5; weather, 0. c. 8 to midnight: course W.NW.; wind sw. by W., 5 to 4.; weather, 0. c. r. I.

March 24.—Course S.; wind W. by S., 6; weather, 0. C.; strong gale from southward and westward. 4 to 8 a. m.: course S.; wind W.SW., 6; weather,

8 to meridian : course S.; wind W.SW., 6; weather, b. c.; saw a ship on the lee beam, standing to the northward. Latitude by observation, 3653 N.; latitude by D. R., 36° 59' 30" N.; longitude by chronometer, 63° 11' 15" W.; longitude' by D. R., 63° 22' 51" W. Drift

. Meridian to 4 p. m.: S.SE.; wind W.ŚW., 4; weather; made a sail on port quarter standing to the northward. 4 to 8 p. m.: course NW.; wind S.SW., 4; weather, c.; at 7 shortened sail. 8 to midnight: course S.; wind W., 7; weather, o. c. q.; strong gales from southward and westward.

March 25.–Course SW. by W.; wind NW., 5; at 2 wind moderated. 4 to 8 a. m.: course W.SW.; wind NW., 4; weather, b. c.; shook the reefs out of the topsails; a large ship in sight astern. 8 to meridian : course SW.; wind W. by N., 4; weather, o. c.; at 1.30 spoke and boarded the ship Flora Southard, of Richmond, Maine, from Havre, bound to New York in ballast, 40 days out. The S. reports a wreck of a Nova Scotia vessel, seen a few days ago, abandoned. Latitude by observation, 360 17' N., latitude by D. R., 370 35' N.; longitude by chronometer, 63° 15' 45'' W.; longitude by D. R., 63° 24' 45'' W. Drift. Meridiar. to 4 p. m.: course S.SW.; wind W. by N., 3; weather, b. c.; signaled the Bremen bark Everhard. “Has the Vermont, 74, been heard from?" She replied, “No.” 4 to 8 p. m.: course S.SW.; wind W. by N., 4; weather, 0.c. r.; sent down mizzen top-gallant yard. 8 to midnight: calm weather, (var.)

March 26.—Commences: course W.SW.; wind N.NW., 2 to 4; weather, 0.c.r. 4 to 8 a. m.: course W.SW.; wind NW., 4; weather, c.; a sail in sight. 8 to meridian : course SW. by W.; wind NW., 4; weather, b. c. Latitude by observations, 35° 30' N.; latitude by D. R., 35° 28' W.; longitude by chronometer, 63° 51' W.; longitude by D. R., 63° 55' W. Drift. Meridian to 4 p. m.: course weather, b. c. 8 to midnight : course SW. by W.; wind NW., 4; weather, b. c.

March 27.—Course N. by W.; wind W. 3; weather, o. c.; at 1, wore ship to northward. 4 to 8 a. m.: course, N. by W.; wind W. 3; weather 0. c. At 1 a ship on port quarter, standing to northward and westward. 8 to meridian: course, W.NW; wind SE., 2; weather, 0. c.: boarded the barkantine Hannibal, of New York, from Philadelphia, bound to Rio. At 10 spoke the ship M. L. Lincoln, from Liverpool to New York. Latitude by observation, 34° 56' N.; latitude by D. R., 35° 22' N.; longitude by chronometer, 64° 26' W.; longitude by D. R., 64° 34' W. Drift. Meridian to 4 p. m. : course W.NW.; wind NE., 6; weather, 0. c. q. At 2.50 a ship reported on the lee beam; made for her; proved to be the United States line-of-battle ship Vermont, 74; no sail set; rudder gone. Ran down to her, manned the rigging and gave nine hearty cheers, the band playing “ Hail Columbia.” The Vermont returned with three cheers. Came to under the Vermont's lee. 4 to 8 p. m.: wind N., 5; weather, b. c.; signalled the Vermont: “Am at your service; will lay by you; show your lights; keep close company." S to midnight: course northward and eastward; wind NW. 4; weather, o. c. q. r. Vermont astern.

March 28.-Hove to; wind N.NW., 4; weather, b. c. 4 to 8 a. m.: hove to; wind N., 4; weather, b. c.; at 6, wore ship and stood for the Vermont; at 7,15,

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