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"There, Biddy, when you've not spoken did n't. I mean," she added hastily, to Professor Ewing!” remonstrated Grace, "you 're not very fit, are you --a bit soft? patiently passive beneath the caress. You professors and clever bookworms, like

He stood watching the girl who “did her Grace here, burn the midnight and not understand.” She wouldn't. of don't exercise. You don't hate chairs as

Like a corrected child, she gave the pups and I do. Come over to the him her hand in a warm, strong, almost courts some day, and I 'll beat you at boyish grip, and as quickly snatched it tennis,” she said, and looked so able to from his undetaining fingers to seize the do it that Ewing was nettled, and unexcollar of an Airedale in an upward leap pectedly, even to himself, accepted the for the plate of incoming muffins. The challenge as casually as it was given. dog-whip in Bridget's other hand fell "Very well. I am a bit soft, and shall keenly on the dog once.

have to borrow a racket. But when will "Down, Disgrace!" she ordered. you plaster the court with my gelatinous

"Not here, Biddy!" Grace protested. protoplasm?" "I cannot bear to see you whip-”

“Oh, I can't return that volley. We “You cannot bear to have your china 'll call it off if it 's a match in vocabbroken either, dear,” retorted Bridget. “I ularies," declared Bridget, her eyes uncannot teach them Sunday manners by affrighted above her third buttery muffin. whipping them on Monday. Go to the “But when it is not words, but deeds, hearth-rug, pups," said Bridget, calmly, watch me!" and the dogs reluctantly obeyed.

“As when you reject a certain rich man “I feared you had forgotten it was Sun- and prefer independence and raising pigs." day,” Grace murmured deprecatingly, re- Grace's tone implied unlimited forbeargarding her sister-in-law's green sportcoat and heavy, muddy brown boots. "Riches take unto themselves wings," Bridget looked at herself in the long glass quoted Bridget. "Whether pigs have opposite.

wings is yet to be proved. Anyway, with "I don't look very Sabbatical," she the present price of pork, it seemed like owned; "but pigs will be born of a Sun- flying in the face of opportunity not to day.”

try it, considering the number of cheap “My dear!” The shocked little protest boarding-houses in the neighborhood.” wrung from Grace brought a look of mock "They do not affect us at all," said panic to Bridget's eyes; but she demurely Grace, with the dainty air of superiority took a muffin and her tea, and, refusing that Ewing liked in her. "Many old the chair Ewing proffered, stood near the families are still here." dogs, unsuitably offset by the austere mid- “Yes, poor old families !" assented Victorian marble mantelpiece, which Bridget, carelessly: "but they sell to seemed coldly to reject her casual disre- boarding-houses, and the property is rungard of formality.

ning down. There's no blinking that, my Assuredly she was not his type of

of dreamer." woman, with her fractious dark hair, tiny "Some of the best business men in town freckles on her tip-tilted nose, and those do not agree with you," asserted Grace. steady eyes that met his on a level. Grace "Stick to your piglets, or something you had such a beguiling way of looking up know about, my dear." at one! She did so now, as if trying to Bridget justly divided the last muffin, a placate his criticism of Bridget.

third to the bad, two thirds to the good "Won't you sit down, dear?" she gently dog, and changed the subject without resuggested. "You are keeping Mr. Ewing sentment. standing."

“Here, Disgrace, is more than you

de"Oh, pray don't!" said Bridget, easily. serve for grabbing. The other is Herb "I always do, and you-look as if you o' Grace o' Sunday, but just His Grace on

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looked her gentle reproach. “But what Of course you would have to sell," he can I do for you, since we are bound to be said. interrupted ?” he asked, with a new feel- “Why?” ing of self-confidence. He had left the "Oh, you could n't live on a trolley"Legal Adviser" in the hall, and was glad. track. It would be too incongruous."

"I want your advice, a man's sane busi- "No; I really could n't live here then," ness advice and help."

she conceded quietly. "I am not a lawyer or a business man,” "But we must hope for the best," he he reminded her.

comforted her. "You are you; you have always helped "What best?" she queried unexpectedly. me.” Her simplicity and reliance quick- “That the trolley may not rout you ened his pulse. “Do you think you could out,” he explained, and she smiled; then place a mortgage for me, Sam?”

she suggested tentatively, hanging on his "Why, surely.” He had never placed opinion: Where did one "place" it? he won- “But the mortgage.

Could you get dered; but of course he could, it must fifteen thousand dollars on the house, do be quite simple. “A mortgage on-er - you

think? It was assessed at twenty, two some of your property ?"

years ago, and I believe Harry refused "On this house."

thirty-five for it once." “Oh, must you ?” he protested, think- Ewing had exactly fifteen thousand in ing how she must shrink from it, this gilt-edged bonds, his savings and his uncle's house to which she had come as a bride legacy. It seemed like a vast sum to raise from the shabby old parsonage behind the on one mortgage, but it probably was not. brick wall. The Loveland house had been “Leave it to me. I 'll see to it,” he the big house of the neighborhood when said as easily as if such little business transthey were children, though lately the new actions were daily affairs for him; only so residences had all gone out beyond the could he convince her that she was not

asking too much, rather doing him a favor "Is there no other way?" he urged, in depending on him. “Leave it to me, wishing to spare her, yet with nothing to I will bring you the-papers.” He seized go by in his knowledge of her affairs. that term at a venture; all business deal

“I have decided to do it.” Her tones ings had papers, he supposed. were so even, betraying no hint of falter

There was a sound of racing feet up ing or of self-pity, that his heart applauded the front steps, and the front door burst her courage. “Bridget does not approve. open, 'followed by a girl's laugh and a She says rent or sell. I do not wish to do

volley of yaps. either." She hesitated, her blue eyes look- "The trio!" Grace interpreted the ing off thoughtfully.

sounds, and rang for muffins. "You do "No; naturally not,” he concurred. not know what a load you have lifted from

"She says, if it were hers, she would my unwise woman's mind, nor what it rent rather than carry a mortgage; but the means to have a man to fend for me- -" rent would not be enough to-to meet my But the trio, on one another's heels, present requirements." Ewing wondered breezy girl and excited Airedales, were in passing if Loveland had left debts; but coming in as Grace spoke, and the girl's that could not be asked, and she would be prompt protest delayed for no greetings: too loyal to say so, game little woman! "A man to fend for her, is it? The “As to selling, I am not ready to do that. graceless Grace, when I 'm here! Am I Bridget does n't understand."

not more to you than ten brothers, my “No. How could she?" His tone con

The dark head bent tempestudemned Bridget unheard.

ously down to the blonde one, and Grace "There is rumor that the trolley may was saucily kissed on the tip of her straight come down this avenue. In that event nose,

common.

a

pretty ?”

search title. It would cost about fifty hat, and between her Irish-gray eyes was dollars. Ewing curtly explained that he a little worried scowl that was unbecomknew the “party of the first part" and no ing, making her look older than her five search would be necessary.

and twenty years. Immediately after signing the mortgage, Grace's eyes might fill with tears, as Grace summoned him to be "seriously just now when she had brokenly thanked talked to," she said. She greeted him him; but she never wrinkled her brow or anxiously. Was he very sure he wanted lost her sweet serenity. Grace was wonto take the mortgage himself? She had derful, incomparable. He gloried in havnot thought of that; she had merely signed ing served her even so little. the papers, as he bade her. Her blue eyes But Bridget was talking, her frown disbesought his reassurance; her hands were pelled by a little toss of the head. clasped solicitously. Reverently he took “Grace says you have lots of tennis the hands to his lips, surprised at his own trophies, state champion cups and other temerity. She withdrew them gently. relics." Ewing wondered how much of "No woman ever had a truer knight," she a "relic" Bridget thought him. He was said, and he was exalted as one who had not quite superannuated, even if he had received the accolade.

neglected athletics for other pastimes. She Departing, he was brought to earth by went on cheerfully: "Grace says you will Bridget, whom he encountered on the give me a most awful beating. When

shall we three meet on the tennis-courts to prove her all wrong? She will referee.”

"To-morrow, if you like. I know I am not in your class,” he said smoothly. Bridget chuckled. She quoted:

"The devil did grin,
For his favorite sin
Is the pride that apes humility.”

She whistled to the dogs, then said: "Well, beat me if you can. I play like a man, and give and ask no quarter.” She nodded debonairly and ran up the steps, the Airedales bounding, as usual, at her heels. “Till three to-morrow. Beware!" she cried over her shoulder.

Such a cock-sure young person! Sam determined, indeed, to give her no quarter; no silly underhand serves, no faults overlooked, no gallant letting her have a game or two to soften defeat. No; since she played like a man let her take her beating like one. He set his jaw grimly, and with

his soft hat pulled well down over his A.L.

eyes he swung down the street, mollified

only when the recollection of Grace's stone steps— Bridget in her durable-he confidence in his victory fell like balm hated women's clothes to look durable- on his vexed masculinity. He liked a khaki suit and swinging a walking-stick. feminine woman. He hated a woman to carry a stick. Her Ten years ago the state championship hair was blown about under a soft white had been Ewing's, and with inward relish

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Monday,” she explained to Ewing. “They and forgot Bridget utterly in Grace's are both named for the lady of the house.' smile.

Her evident adoration of Grace was He placed the mortgage. That is, after this positive young person's one redeem- offering it to two or three acquaintances ing quality, Ewing decided as he held and finding them with no funds available Grace's hand a short moment in parting, for that particular investment, almost inand would have perfunctorily touched dignantly he took it himself. He could Bridget's.

not bear that the mortgage on her home "Butter fingers !” she warned him, dis- should go begging. It was so personal a playing hers after the muffin.

matter, almost as if her portrait should "It 's the best butter,” laughed Grace, be bandied about in the market-place like who also knew her "Alice."

a common piece of property. "Or p'r'aps, if we butter his paws, like His bonds were bringing five per cent., the cat, he'll come back," Bridget sug- and this rate would be the same. The gested, solemnly holding out her buttery change could not affect his income for his hand, ready to test it.

mother; of course he could not do that "He'll come without that,” Grace even for Grace. answered her, but looked up at Sam, who A young Boston lawyer with whom absently took her hand again.

mortgages seemed matters of course drew “May I, often." he demanded eagerly, up the papers and asked if he should

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search title. It would cost about fifty hat, and between her Irish-gray eyes was dollars. Ewing curtly explained that he a little worried scowl that was unbecomknew the "party of the first part" and no ing, making her look older than her five search would be necessary.

and twenty years. Immediately after signing the mortgage, Grace's eyes might fill with tears, as Grace summoned him to be "seriously just now when she had brokenly thanked talked to," she said. She greeted him him; but she never wrinkled her brow or anxiously. Was he very sure he wanted lost her sweet serenity. Grace was wonto take the mortgage himself? She had derful, incomparable. He gloried in havnot thought of that; she had merely signed ing served her even so little. the papers, as he bade her. Her blue eyes But Bridget was talking, her frown disbesought his reassurance; her hands were pelled by a little toss of the head. clasped solicitously. Reverently he took “Grace says you have lots of tennis the hands to his lips, surprised at his own trophies, state champion cups and other temerity. She withdrew them gently. relics." Ewing wondered how much of “No woman ever had a truer knight," she a “relic" Bridget thought him. He was said, and he was exalted as one who had

not quite superannuated, even if he had received the accolade.

neglected athletics for other pastimes. She Departing, he was brought to earth by went on cheerfully: "Grace says you will Bridget, whom he encountered on the give me a most awful beating. When

a shall we three meet on the tennis courts to prove her all wrong? She will referee.”

"Tomorrow, if you like. I know I am not in your class,” he said smoothly. Bridget chuckled. She quoted:

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“The devil did grin,
For his favorite sin
Is the pride that apes humility.”

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She whistled to the dogs, then said: "Well, beat me if you can. I play like a man, and give and ask no quarter.” She nodded debonairly and ran up the steps, the Airedales bounding, as usual, at her heels. “Till three to-morrow. Beware!" she cried over her shoulder.

Such a cock-sure young person! Sam determined, indeed, to give her no quarter; no silly underhand serves, no faults overlooked, no gallant letting her have a game or two to soften defeat. No; since she played like a man let her take her beating

He set his jaw grimly, and with his soft hat pulled well down over his eyes he swung down the street, mollified only when the recollection of Grace's confidence in his victory fell like balm on his vexed masculinity. He liked a feminine woman.

Ten years ago the state championship had been Ewing's, and with inward relish

like one.

A.L.

stone steps - Bridget in her durable-he hated women's clothes to look durablekhaki suit and swinging a walking-stick. He hated a woman to carry a stick. Her hair was blown about under a soft white

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