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A GREAT MAROH.

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boro'. After visiting Terry, at Cox's bridge, he rode into the town, where he found Schofield already arrived.

The campaign was now ended, for he had reached the point for which he had started the Autumn before. But what an astonishing march it had been! A desolate tract of country, forty miles wide, and between two and three hun. dred miles long, across the State of Georgia, and one equally wide, and far more desolate, for nearly five hundred miles, from Savannah to the heart of North Carolina, marked

its line of progress.

Sherman now turned over his army to Schofield, and hastened to City Point to consult with Grant respecting the next move to be made. Here he also met the President, who welcomed him with grem cordiality.

In the meantime, Quarter-master Meigs came down, and in a fortnight supplied twenty thousand men with shoes, and one hundred thousand with clothing, and every thing neces sary for entering on another campaign

CHAPTER XLI.

FEBRUARY--- APRIL 1865.

INTERVIEW BETWEEN GRANT AND SHERMAN-REVIEW OF THE MILITARY FIELD

-CANDY'S PREPARATIONS AGAINST MOBILE-STONEMAN'S ADVANCE FROM EAST TENNESSEE-CAVALRY RAID FROM VICKSBURG--ANOTHER FROM EASTPORT, MISSISSIPPI-SHERIDAN'S RAID UP THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY AND ROUND RICHMOND TO THE WHITE HOUSE-HE REACHES THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC THE SAME DAY AS SHERMAN-GRANT'S PLAN TO MOVE AROUND THE REBEL RIGHT FLANK-REBEL ATTACK ON FORT STEADMAN-SHERMAN RETURNS TO HIS ARMY-GRANT BEGINS HIS MOVEMENT-UNEXPECTED BUCCESS-BATTLE OF FIVE FORKS—GRAND ASSAULT OF THE ENEMY'S LINES -EVACUATION OF PETERSBURG AND RICHMOND-LEE RETREATS TOWARD

DANVILLE-THE PURSUIT-LINCOLN AND DAVIS ON THE DAY OF THE BAT

TLE-WEITZEL ENTERS RICHMOND-THE CITY FIRED BY THE REBELS-LEE

HARD PRESSED-HIS RETREAT CUT OFF-GRANT DEMANDS HIS SURRENDER

THE CORRESPONDENCE-THE CAPITULATION-SURRENDER OF THE TROOPS

OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA --JOY OF THE NORTH OVER THE VICTORY.

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HE interview between Grant and Sherman was one of

intense interest. The subject of the consultation was no less than the manner in which the death blow should be given to the rebellion, for the final, decisive hour both believed to be near at hand. Still, a mistake on their part at this juncture might prove fatal—while a wise move in the right direction would bring complete triumph. The stake for which they were to throw, was this Great Republic, and they might well ponder on the threshold of such a momentous event.

Sherman from the 1st of February had been locked the heart of the enemy's country, and hence knew but imperfectly, either what Grant had done, or intended to do;

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STONEMAN AND CANBY.

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but now the military map was spread out before him, and the field of operations, both past and present, unfolded and explained.

First, as he was starting from Savannah, Grant had directed Thomas to send General Stoneman from East Tennes. see, down into South Carolina, with a cavalry force to de stroy the railroads, and military resources of the country. But before he could get away, Sherman was well-nign across the State doing that work himself. Grant, therefore, on the last of February, ordered Thomas to send him, instead, with four or five thousand cavalry east, to destroy the railroad toward Lynchburg, in which work he was now engaged. At this time Canby was preparing a movement from Mobile Bay against Mobile, and Thomas was directed, in order to make a diversion in his favor, to send a cavalry force, ten thousand strong, from Eastport, Mississippi, deep into Alabamp. In the meantime ansther body, seven or eight thousand strong, was to move east from Vicksburg for the same purpose. These movements, Grant thought, with the work done in South Carolina, were all that would be wanted to leave nothing for the rebellion to stand on.”

Sheridan, in the meantime had completed his raid from the Shenandoah Valley. On the 20th of February, Grant telegraphed to him to take a cavalry force as soon as the roads could be traveled and advance on Lynchburg, and after destroying the railroad and canal near it, to push on

if

practicable, and join Sherman who was inferior to the enemy in cavalry, and might be in great need of reinforcements to this arm.

On the 27th of the month, with two divisions of cavalry -in all ten thousand men-he left Winchester, and by a rapid movement succeeded, two days after, in securing the bridge across the middle fork of the Shenandoah at Mount Crawford, and the next day entered Staunton. The rebel

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SEERIDAN'S RAID,

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troops in the Valley as before stated, had mostly been with. drawn to reinforce Lee at Richmond, yet Early was still here with a moderate force, and on the approach of Sheri: dan fell back to Waynesboro and intrenched. The latter pushed rapidly on after him, and arriving in front of his works, without waiting even for a reconnoissance, ordered the bugles to sound the charge. With a rush and a hurrah the bold riders dashed over every obstacle and carried the position like a whirlwind, capturing sixteen hundred prisoners, elaven pieces of artillery, with horses and caissons complete, two hundred loaded wagons and teams, and seventeen battle flags.

Sending the prisoners back under an escort to Winchester, he moved on to Charlottesville, destroying the railroad and bridges as he advanced. Reaching this place on the 3d, he halted two days to break up the railroad and bridges toward Lynchburg and Richmond, and to wait for the arrival of his trains. This delay gave the enemy at Lynchburg time to prepare for his approach, and he abandoned the design of capturing it.

. On the 6th, he again put his force in motion, dividing it into two columns; one of which marched to Scottsville, from whence it moved up the James River to New Market, destroying the locks, and in many places the banks of the canal. From this point a force was sent out to sccure a bridge across the river at Duiguidsville, but the enemy, apprised of the movement, burned it.

The other column moved down the railroad, toward Lynchburg, and destroyed it to within sixteen miles of the place.

Unfortunately the spring floods had so swelled the river that the pontoons which Sheridan had brought along would not reach across the river, and the enemy having burned the bridges, he was unable to get over and move south as he

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int-rded, and join Sherman. Of course, nothing was now left him to do, but either to retrace his steps, or, advancing down the river, sweep around Richmond to the north, and put himself in communication with Grant's army by reaching a new base at the White House. He chose the latter exourse, and keeping on toward the rebel Capital, destroying the railroud as he advanced, at length on the 10th concentrated liis forces at Columbia. Here he rested one day, and sent of trusty scouts to Grant, informing him of his plans, and asking that supplies be sent to him at the White House, Two days after, these scouts were brought into the Lieutenant General's presence, who immediately on receiving Sheridan's message, dispatched an infantry force to hold the White IIouse.

Sheridan, in the meantime, marched forward toward Richmond, sending consternation into the rebel Capital. A strong column was at once sent out to cut him off, but whceliiig to the left, he crossed the North and South Anna Rivers--burning the bridges behind him--and moving down the north bank of the Pamunkey, reached the White House on the 19th. Halting here to rest and refit, he marched across to James River, and on the 27th, the very day of Sherman's arrival, joined the Army of the Potomac.

Grant now determined to send him around the rebel lełty and rcach, if possible, the South-side and Danville railroads. As this would be the line of Lee's retreat, should he evacuate Richmond and attempt to join Johnston, who was oper. ating against Sherman's army, it was of vital importance that it should be destroyed. The movement was to commeme on the 29th-two Corps being directed to advance in tlie same direction to support him, and, if possibic, turn the rebel position at Petersburg. But two days before it was to take place, the rebels carried by sudden assault Fort

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