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FATE OF BRADFORD.

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making their escape unburt, nothing definite is known; and it is to be feared that many have been murdered after being taken away from the fort.

“In reference to the fate of Major Bradford, who was in command of the fort when it was captured, and who had up to that time received no injury, there seems to be no doubt. The general understanding everywhere seemed to be, that he had been brutally murdered the day after he was taken prisoner.

“There is some discrepancy in the testimony, but your Committee do not see how the one who professed to have been an eye-witness of his death could have been mistaken. There

may be some uncertainty in regard to his fate. "When your Committee arrived at Memphis, Tennessee they found and examined a man (Mr. McLagan) who had been conscripted by some of Forrest's forces, but who, with other conscripts, had succeeded in making his escape. Tie testifies that while two companies of rebel troops, with Major Bradford and many other prisoners, were on their march from Brownsville to Jackson, Tennessee, Major Bradford was taken by five rebels-one an officer--led about fifty yards from the line of march, and deliberately murdered, in view of all there assembled. He fell-killed instantly by three musket-balls, even while asking that his life might be spared, as he had fought them manfully, and was deserving of a better fate. The motive for the murder of Major Bradford, seems to have been the simple fact that, although a native of the South, he remained loyal to his Government. The testimony herewith submitted, contains many statements made by the rebels, that they did not intend to treat 'homemade Yankees,' as they termed loyal Southerners, any better than negro troops."

The testimony taken was very voluminous—covering the whole ground; and, that there might be no charg" Constant

302

TESTIMONY OF A PRIVATE.

unfairness, the name and rank of each witness were given, together with all the questions put to him. A severe cross- ; examination would doubtless have caused many of the statements to be modified, and have impeached the credibility of some of the witnesses.

As an example of the kind of testimony bearing hardest against the perpetrators of this enormous crime, we give a single statement made by a private:

"In about five minutes after the disappearance of the flag of truce, a general assault was made upon our works from every direction. They were kept at bay for some time, when the negroes gave way upon the left, and ran down the bluff

, leaving an opening through which the rebels entered, and immediately commenced an indiscriminate slaughter of both white and black. We all threw down our arms, and gave tokens of surrender, asking for quarter. (I was wounded in the right shoulder and muscle of the back, and knocked down, before I threw down my gun.) But no quarter was given. Voices were heard upon all sides, crying: 'Give them no quarter; kill

, them; kill them; it is General Forrest's orders. I saw four white men and at least twenty-five negroes shot while begging for mercy; and I saw one negro dragged from a hollow log within ten feet of where I lay, and as one rebel held him by the foot another shot him. These were all soldiers. There were also two negro women and three little children standing within twenty-five steps from me, when a rebel stepped up to them and said: 'Yes, God damn you, you thought you were free, did you?' and shot them alt. They all fell but one child, when he knocked it in the head with the breach of his

gun. They then disappeared in the direction of the landing, following up the fugitives, firing at them wherever seen. They came back in about three-quarters of an hour, shooting, and robbing the dead of their money and clothes. I saw ? man with a canteen upon him, and a pistol in his hand. I

ATTACK ON PLYMOUTH.

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ventored to ask him for a drink of water. He turned around, saying: Yes, God damn you, I will give you a drink of water,' and shot at my head three different times, covering my face up with dust, and then turned from me, no doubt thinking he had killed me, remarking: God damn you, it's too late to pray now;' then went on with his pilfering. I lay there until dark, feigning death, when a rebel officer came along, drawing his sabre, and ordered me to get up, threatening to run his sabre into me if I did not, saying I had to march ten miles that night. I súcceeded in getting up, and got among a small squad he had already gathered up, but stole away from them during the night, and got among the dead, feigning death, for fear of being murdered. The next morning, the gunboat came up and commenced shelling them out, when I crawled out from among the dead, and with a piece of paper motioned to the boat; she came up, and I crawled on board.

WILLIAM F. † Mays."

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It is hard to believe that native-born American citizens-men brought up in the light of the civilization of the Nineteenth Century, and educated under Christian influences, could be guilty of such deeds. Acts of violence have been committed on both sides, during this sanguinary struggle, which are undreamed of by the public. It always has been, and always will be so, in war; but such deeds as these, are noi to be ciassed amid its ordinary cruelties, and should never find a place among the records of civilization. Their proper place is in the war song of the Indian, as he dances around the fire ia which his blecling captives are writhing.

Another event of considerable importance, occurred on the Eastern coast, at Plymouth, North Carolina, during the month.

A land force of rebels made a furious attack, on the 18th, upon the garrison commanded by General Wessels,

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but were repulsed. The next day, the iron-clad rebel ramAlbemarle - came down the Roanoke River, and attacked the Southfield and Miami. These two boats were fastened together at the time, and were driven straight on the hostile steamer, as she came heavily down. The latter, reckless of the heavy rifled shot, that bounded like peas from her mailed sides, moved fearlessly on the two boats, striking the Southfield--sinking her immediately, and seriously damaging the Miami. Captain Flusser was killed in the engagement. It was feared that the ram would soon have possession of the whole Sound, and that Roanoke Island would be attacked. Plymouth had to be evacuated, and the public was loud in its denunciations of the Secretary of the Navy. A resolution of inquiry was passed by Congress, requesting him to give an explanation of the matter,

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SANITARY FAIRS BANKS IN NEW ORLEANS-INAUGURATION OF THE FRER

STATE GOVERNMENT-THE RED RIVER COTTON EXPEDITION-PORTER'S

ASCENT OF THE RED RIVER-CAPTURE OF BATTERIES BY GENERAL SMITH

MARCH OF BANKS ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO ALEXANDRIA-ADVANCE INTO

THE INTERIOR-DEFEAT OF BANKS--RETREAT OF STEELE-RETURN OF THE

GUNBOATS TO ALEXANDRIA-UNABLE TO

GET BELOW THE

FALLS-GRAND

ENGINEERING SUCCESS OF COLONEL BAILEY-PASSAGE OF THE FALLS BY

THE FLEET--AN EXCITING SPECTACLE-PROMOTION OF BAILLY-DESTRUO

TION OF THE GUNBOATS SIGNAL, COVINGTON, AND TRANSPORT WARNER

RETURN OF THE EXPEDITION-CANBY SUPERCEDES BANKS IN THE FIELD

THE LATTER RETURNS TO NEW ORLEANS-VIEW OF THE EXPEDITION.

THOT

OUGH having no direct bearing on the war, the great

Fairs throughout the country the first few months of this

year, deserve a special mention. The raising of funds on such a gigantic scale for the relief of our wounded and sick soldiers, had never before been witnessed. Independent of the amount of good doue, and the vast number of soldiers thus saved to the army, it created a bond between the people and the soldiers that rendered it impossible for them ever to feel that their interests were separate.

Before the great decisive movements of the Spring commenced, the country was destined to suffer one more mortification from the failure of an ill-starred expedition.

General Banks in New Orleans after adjusting the labor system and seeing to the elections, on the 4tîi of March inaugurated the Free State government with the most imposing ceremonies.

A multitude, estimated at fifty thousand in number, assembled in Lafayette Square, where a platform had been erected, and the newly elected Governor Hahn war

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