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BATTLE OF CARNIFEX FERRY

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the

the dense fog that had settled over them, they lay down in green meadows with the mountains standing like grim sentinels around them. The drum and bugle echoing through the solitude, roused them up before the light, and at dawn the column was winding its way towards Summerville. Soon firing ahead put them to the double-quick, and breaking into the town along the single street that traversed it, they saw the rebels fleeing along the hill-sides beyond. Halting here to question the inhabitants respecting the roads, and examine the official map of the country, found in the clerk's office, Rosecrans again took up his line of march, and entering the hills, pressed forwards towards the enemy's intrenchments. They soon came upon his pickets, and the irregular firing of the advance skirmishers commenced.

BATTLE OF CARNIFEX FERRY.

Rosecrans knew he was in presence of the main body of the enemy, but of his position or the character of his defenses he was totally ignorant. In this dilemma, General Benham asked permission to take his brigade forward to feel the enemy. Rosecrans consented that he should make a bold reconnoissance, nothing more. The brigade started forward, and Rosecrans rode to the top of the hill with his Staff to get, if possible, a better observation of the condition of things. He stood here a moment, while the artillery was laboring up the hill, when suddenly a deep, prolonged roar of musketry burst from the woods directly in front where the first brigade was moving. The terrible suspicion flashed over him that it had been led into ambush, and would be inevitably cut up, but the next moment the swift, deliberate volleys of our men assured him it was not so, and that they were calmly facing the enemy. Soon the artillery opened, making stern music there among the mountain crags. Rosecrans now ordered

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MC COOK'S REGIMENT.

up the Twelfth Ohio under Colonel Lowe. Charging along at the double-quick, the regiment saluted the general as they rose the crest of the hill, with thundering cheers, and then plunged forward into the thicket out of which the incessant volleys rang. Howitzers and field-pieces toiled heavily after, followed by the teams straining up the steep acclivity, and it seemed, for a time, as if a desperate battle was to be fought there with an unseen foe, and on an unknown field. Hastily protecting his rear, Rosecrans put spurs to his horse, and dashed to the front amid a shower of balls. Crossing the woods he came to a clearing in which were the enemy's works. At this critical moment word came to McCook's German brigade, that had not yet been in the fight, that they were to move forward, and storm the intrenchments. This was just what the gallant colonel wanted, and rejoiced at the tidings, he dashed along his lines, shouting in trumpet tones to his brave troops what they were to do. Wild, tumultuous cheers greeted the announcement, and waving swords, clashing muskets, and hats thrown into the air, made it a scene of thrilling excitement. The drums beat, and gaily as to a banquet, the steady column moved forward. But orders at this juncture were received from Rosecrans, forbidding the assault. A part of the regiment had charged almost up to the enemy's work on the extreme left, and had to be recalled by the bugle. Night was coming on, and the commander did not deem it prudent to make the attempt in the darkness. Besides if it were successful it might be at a great expense of life which the morning light would prevent. The battle. had raged for four hours, and now in the darkness the troops were ordered to fall back on the lines. They lay on their arms all night, and a part of them within two or three hundred yards of the fort. When the morning dawned, it was discovered that the enemy had fled. Floyd, finding himself so furiously assailed in front and flank, deemed it prudent to

DEATH OF COLONEL LOWE.

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decamp, and leaving large quantities of ammunition, stores, etc., hastily crossed the Gauley river, and destroyed the ferry-boat, so that pursuit was impossible. Our loss was come hundred and twenty killed and wounded. Among the former was Colonel Lowe of the Twelfth Ohio, who fell at the head of his regiment.

CHAPTER X.

SEPTEMBER, 1861.

VALL OF LEXINGTON—FREMONT BLAMED FOR IT-CHARGES AGAINST H.MATTITUDE OF KENTUCKY-ITS LEGISLATURE ORDERS THE REBEL FORCES TO LEAVE THE STATE-MAGOFFIN-GENERAL LEE SENT TO WESTERN VIRGINIAFIGHT AT CHEAT MOUNTAIN PASS-DEFEAT OF LEE AT ELK WATER-DEATH OF JOHN WASHINGTON-POSITION OF THE ARMIES ON THE POTOMAC-OCCUPATION OF MUNSON'S HILL-OBSERVANCE OF THE NATIONAL FAST.

SOON

NOON after this brilliant exploit, the national heart was saddened by the news of the fall of Lexington, Missouri, and the capture of Colonel Mulligan (who held the place), with his entire command. On the first of the month, Colonel Mulligan, in his intrenched camp at Jefferson City, received orders to proceed with his Irish brigade to Lexington, a hundred and sixty miles up the river, and reinforce the few troops already there. He reached the place on the ninth, swelling the force to about three thousand five hundred men. He had, however, been there only three days at work, when the driving in of his pickets announced the near approach of the enemy. After the battle of Wilson's Creek, Price chased Lane and Montgomery from the state, and then. turned his steps towards Warrensburg, where, he heard, there was a Federal force. The latter fled at his approach, and he continued his march to Lexington, with an army variously estimated at from fifteen to thirty thousand men,

Midway between the towns of old and new Lexington,situated about a mile apart,-Mulligan took his position, and commenced throwing up a breast-work ten feet high, surrounded by a broad ditch, but had time only partially to complete it when the arrival of the enemy compelled him to suspend operations. A large, brick building used as a col

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