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S. 3336. An act to promote the apportionment of the waters of the Columbia River and tributaries for irrigation and other purposes by including the States of Nevada and Utah among the States authorized to negotiate a compact providing for such apportionment.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Bartlett, one of its clerks, announced that the House had agreed to the amendment of the Senate to each of the following bills of the House:

H. R. 1067. An act to authorize the Supreme Court of the United States to make and publish rules for procedure on review of decisions of the Tax Court of the United States; and

H. R. 5578. An act for the relief of Hatsuko Kuniyoshi Dillon.

The message also announced that the House had agreed to the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 1673) for the relief of James I. Smith.

The message further announced that the House had agreed to the report of the committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 5731) to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to construct, operate, and maintain certain facilities to provide water for irrigation and domestic use from the Santa Margarita River, Calif., and the joint utilization of a dam and reservoir and other waterwork facilities by the Department of the Interior and the Department of the Navy, and for other purposes.

ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED

The message also announced that the Speaker had affixed his signature to the following enrolled bills, and they were signed by the Vice President:

S. 1303. An act to provide for the expeditious naturalization of former citizens of the United States who have lost United States citizenship by voting in a political election or plebiscite held in occupied Japan; and

S. 3480. An act to amend section 24 of the Federal Reserve Act, as amended.

COMMITTEE MEETING DURING SENATE SESSION

On request of Mr. JENNER, and by unanimous consent, the Committee on Rules and Administration was authorized to hold hearings this afternoon, during the session of the Senate.

ORDER FOR TRANSACTION OF ROUTINE BUSINESS

Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that immediately following the quorum call and a brief executive session, there may be the customary morning hour for the transaction of routine business, under the usual 2-minute limitation on speeches.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Without objection, it is so ordered.

The Chief Clerk proceeded to call the roll.

William W. Walker, of North Carolina, for promotion from Foreign Service officer of class 3 to class 2.

The following-named Foreign Service officers for promotion from class 4 to

Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order for the quorum call be rescinded. The VICE PRESIDENT. Without ob- class 3: jection, it is so ordered.

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I move that the Senate proceed to consider executive business.

The motion was agreed to; and the Senate proceeded to the consideration of executive business.

EXECUTIVE MESSAGES REFERRED

The VICE PRESIDENT laid before the Senate messages from the President of the United States submitting sundry nominations, and withdrawing the nominations of Sara K. Lea and Mrs. Jessie C. Brewer, to be postmasters at Flat Rock, Ala., and Higginson, Ark., respectively, which nominating messages were referred to the appropriate committees. (For nominations this day received, see the end of Senate proceedings.)

EXECUTIVE REPORTS OF A
COMMITTEE

The following favorable reports of nominations were submitted:

William Barnes, of Massachusetts.
Findley Burns, Jr., of Minnesota.
John E. Devine, of Illinois.
Harrison Lewis, of California.

The following-named Foreign Service officers for promotion from class 5 to class 4 and to be also consuls of the United States of America:

Frank J. Devine, of New York.
David H. Ernst, of Massachusetts.
Douglas N. Forman, Jr., of Ohio.
Harold G. Josif, of Ohio.

The following-named Foreign Service officers for promotion from class 6 to class 5:

Alan G. James, of the District of Columbia.

Abraham Katz, of New York. Lawrence C. Mitchell, of California. Jacob M. Myerson, of the District of Columbia.

Peter J. Peterson, of California.

Milton K. Wells, of Oklahoma, now a Foreign Service officer of class 2 and a secretary in the diplomatic service, to be also a consul general of the United States of America.

The following-named persons, now Foreign Service officers of class 3 and secretaries in the diplomatic service, to be also consuls general of the United

By Mr. BRICKER, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce: James C. Worthy, of Illinois, to be Assist- States of America: ant Secretary of Commerce; and

John C. Bose, and sundry other persons for permanent appointment in the Coast and Geodetic Survey.

The VICE PRESIDENT. If there be no further reports of committees, the clerk will state the nominations on the calendar.

UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE

The Chief Clerk read the nomination

of Walter E. Hoffman, to be United States district judge for the eastern district of

Virginia.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Without objection, the nomination is confirmed.

UNITED STATES MARSHAL The Chief Clerk read the nomination of William A. O'Brien, to be United States marshal for the eastern district of Penr sylvania.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Without obWithout objection, the nomination is confirmed. Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the President be immediately notified of the confirmation of these nominations.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Without objection, the President will be notified forthwith.

NOTICE OF CONSIDERATION OF CERTAIN NOMINATIONS

Mr. WILEY. Mr. President, the Senate received today the following nomi

Mr. KNOWLAND. I suggest the ab- nations: sence of a quorum.

The VICE PRESIDENT. tary will call the roll.

The Secre

Francis A. Flood, of Oklahoma, for promotion from Foreign Service officer of class 2 to class 1.

C. Vaughn Ferguson, Jr., of New York. Paul Paddock, of Iowa.

The following-named persons, now Foreign Service officers of class 5 and secretaries in the diplomatic service, to be also consuls of the United States of America:

Thomas H. Murfin, of Washington.
Harry F. Pfeiffer, Jr., of Maryland.
DeWitt L. Stora, of California.

William O. Hall, of Oregon, for appointment as a Foreign Service officer of class 1, a consul, and a secretary in the diplomatic service of the United States of America.

The following-named persons for appointment as Foreign Service officers of class 2, consuls, and secretaries in the diplomatic service of the United States of America:

Alexander B. Daspit, of Louisiana. Harvey Klemmer, of Maryland.

The following-named persons for appointment as Foreign Service officers of class 4, consuls, and secretaries in the diplomatic service of the United States

of America:

John M. Bowie, of the District of Columbia.

Miss Edelen Fogarty, of New York. Francis J. Galbraith, of South Dakota. William F. Gray, of North Carolina. Miss Jean M. Milkowski, of Florida.

The following-named persons for appointment as Foreign Service officers of class 6, vice consuls of career, and secretaries in the diplomatic service of the United States of America:

Sam G. Armstrong, of Texas.
Daniel N. Arzac, Jr., of California.
Robert S. Barrett IV, of Virginia.
Melvin Croan, of Massachusetts.

Walker A. Diamanti, of Utah.
Richard W. Finch, of Ohio.
Martin B. Hickman, of Utah.
Edwin D. Ledbetter, of California.
S. Douglas Martin, of New York.
Calvin E. Mehlert, of California.
John E. Merrian, of California.
J. Theodore Papendorp, of New Jersey.
Harry A. Quinn, of California.
Charles E. Rushing, of Illinois.

Robert H. Wenzel, of Massachusetts. The following-named Foreign Service staff officers to be consuls of the United States of America:

John L. Hagan, of Virginia. Arthur V. Metcalfe, of California. Nestor C. Ortiz, of Virginia. Normand W. Redden, of New York. The following-named Foreign Service reserve officers to be secretaries in the diplomatic service of the United States of America:

Lucius D. Battle, of Florida. Richard E. Funkhouser, of the District of Columbia.

John T. Hanson, of Maryland.
Donald D. Kennedy, of Oregon.

I give notice that these nominations will be considered by the Committee on Foreign Relations at the expiration of 6 days in accordance with the committee rule.

LEGISLATIVE SESSION

Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I move that the Senate resume the consideration of legislative business.

The motion was agreed to; and the Senate resumed the consideration of legislative business.

EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS, ETC.

The VICE PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the following communications and letters, which were referred as indicated:

PROPOSED SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION, TREASURY DEPARTMENT (S. Doc. No. 142)

A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting a proposed supplemental appropriation for the fiscal year 1955, in the amount of $650,000, for the Treasury Department (with an accompanying paper); to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

PROPOSED SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (S. Doc. No. 138)

A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting proposed supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year 1955, in the amount of $9,532,000, for the Department of Agriculture (with an accompanying paper); to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed. PROPOSED SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (S. Doc. No. 137)

A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting proposed supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year 1955, in the amount of $29,081,000, for the Department of Labor (with an accom

supplemental appropriation for the fiscal year 1955, in the amount of $1,800,000, for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (with an accompanying paper); to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

PROPOSED SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE (S. Doc. No. 140)

A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting proposed supplemental appropriations in the amount of $33,556,000, together with a proposed provision and an increase in a trust fund limitation for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, for the fiscal year 1955 (with an accompanying paper); to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

PROPOSED SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS, HOUSING AND HOME FINANCE AGENCY (S. Doc. No. 141)

A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting proposed supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year 1955, in the amount of $17,610,000, and increases in limitations and transfer authority, in the amount of $6,400,000, for the Housing and Home Finance Agency (with an accompanying paper); to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

LAWS ENACTED BY MUNICIPAL COUNCIL OF ST. THOMAS AND ST. JOHN, V. I.

A letter from the Assistant Secretary of the Interior, transmitting, pursuant to law, copies of laws enacted by the Municipal Council of St. Thomas and St. John, V. I. (with accompanying papers); to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

REPORT ON BORROWING AUTHORITY

A letter from the Director, Office of Defense Mobilization, Executive Office of the President, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report on borrowing authority, for the quarter ended March 31, 1954 (with an accompanying report); to the Committee Banking and Currency.

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Mr. JENNER. Mr. President, I present for appropriate reference, and ask unanimous consent to have printed in the RECORD, a resolution adopted by the Maryland State Convention of the panying paper); to the Committee on Ap- American Legion, favoring the adoption

propriations and ordered to be printed. PROPOSED SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE (S. Doc. No. 139)

A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting a proposed

of Senate Resolution 247, to sever diplomatic relations with Iron Curtain governments.

There being no objection, the resolution was referred to the Committee on

Foreign Relations, and ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: RESOLUTION SUPPORTING OBJECTIVES AND PURPOSES OF SENATE RESOLUTION 247, TO SEVER DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS WITH IRON CURTAIN GOVERNMENTS, ADOPTED BY MARYLAND STATE CONVENTION OF THE AMERICAN LEGION, BALTIMORE, MD., JULY 8, 1954

Whereas the Congress of the United States, on September 30, 1950, after years of investigation, inquiry and direct observation, legislatively declared:

"There exists a world communism movement which, in its origins, its development and its present practice, is a worldwide revolutionary movement whose purpose it is to establish a Communist totalitarian dictatorship in the countries throughout the world through the medium of a worldwide Communist organization.

"The Communist organization in the United States, pursuing its stated objectives, the recent successes of Communist methods in other countries, and the nature and control of the world Communist movement itself, present a clear and present danger to the security of the United States and to the existence of free American institutions"; and

Whereas there are an estimated 20 million agents of this conspiracy against humanity spread out in a deadly fifth column encompassing the globe; and

Whereas hearings currently being held by the Internal Security Committee of the United States Senate prove conclusively that the so-called diplomatic missions of Soviet Russia and the alleged governments enslaved by Soviet Russia presently recognized by the United States and other countries of the free world are in fact nests of espionage, seditious propaganda, and sabotage; and

Whereas the conscience of the world demands that the United States, as the last great bastion of freedom, take the lead in expelling from the family of nations the tyrants of Moscow; and

Whereas such action would give notice to the enslaved peoples of the world, and those who are threatened with enslavement, that we will no longer welcome their vile oppressors at the council tables of the world to spew forth their venom in mockery of men of good will; and

Whereas these dastardly bandits have but recently had the temperity to violate the sanctity, safety, and welfare of the Western Hemisphere by shipping arms to Guatemala, in arrogant defiance of the accepted principles of the Monroe Doctrine, for the obvious purpose of widening the Communist breach

that exists in that enslaved country: Therefore be it

Resolved, That this 1954 convention of the Department of Maryland of the American Legion, in session in Baltimore, Md., July 7-10, does hereby support the objectives and purposes of Senate Resolution 247 to the end that the United States sever all diplomatic relations with the Government of Soviet Russia and with the alleged governments of the countries which have been enslaved by the Government of Russia; and be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be sent to all Senators and Congressmen of the State of Maryland; and be it further

Resolved, That this resolution, through proper channels, be presented to the 1954 convention of the American Legion, meeting in Washington, D. C., August 30 and 31 and

September 1 and 2, 1954.

Mr. JENNER. Mr. President, I present for appropriate reference, and ask unanimous consent to have printed in the RECORD a resolution adopted by the convention of the Montana Department of

the American Legion, at Bozeman, Mont., favoring the adoption of Senate Resolution 247, to sever diplomatic relations with Soviet Russia.

There being no objection, the resolution was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations, and ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE 36TH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN LEGION AT BOZEMAN, JUNE 25-27, 1954

Resolution 5 Resolution supporting the purposes and objectives of Senate Resolution 247, the severence of diplomatic relations with Soviet Russia

Whereas the Congress of the United States, on September 30, 1950, after years of investigation, inquiry, and direct observation, legislatively declared:

"There exists a world Communist move

ment which, in its origins, its development, and its practice, is a worldwide revolutionary movement whose purpose it is * * * to establish a Communist totalitarian dictatorship in the countries throughout the world through the medium of a worldwide Communist organization.

"The Communist organization in the United States, pursuing its stated objectives, the recent success of Communist methods in other countries, and the nature and control of the world Communist movement itself, present a clear and present danger to the security of the United States and to the existence of free American institutions"; and Whereas there are an estimated 20 million agents of this conspiracy against humanity spread out in a deadly 5th column encompassing the globe; and

Whereas hearings currently being held by the Internal Security Committee of the United States Senate prove conclusively that the so-called diplomatic missions of Soviet Russia and the alleged governments enslaved by Soviet Russia, presently recognized by the United States and other countries of the free world, are in fact nests of espionage, seditious propaganda and sabotage; and

Whereas the conscience of the world demands that the United States, as the last great bastion of freedom, take the lead in expelling from the family of nations the tyrants of Moscow; and

Whereas such action would give notice to the enslaved peoples of the world, and those who are threatened with enslavement, that we will no longer welcome their vile oppressors at the council tables of the world to spew forth their venom in mockery of men of good will; and

Whereas these dastardly bandits have but recently had the temerity to violate the sanctity, safety, and welfare of the Western Hemisphere by shipping arms to Guatemala in arrogant defiance of the accepted principles of the Monroe Doctrine, for the obvious purpose of widening the Communist breach that exists in that enslaved country: Therefore be it

Resolved, That the American Legion of Montana, in convention assembled, at Bozeman, Mont., this June 25-27, 1954, does hereby support the objectives and purposes of Senate Resolution 247, to the end that the United States sever all diplomatic relations with the Government of Soviet Russia and with the alleged governments of the countries which have been enslaved, by the government of Russia; be it further

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be sent to all Senators and Congressmen of the State of Montana; and be it further

Resolved, That this resolution, through proper channels, be presented to the 1954 convention of the American Legion meeting in Washington, D. C., August 30, 31, September 1 and 2, 1954.

THE HYDROGEN BOMB-RESOLUTION OF WISCONSIN PIPE TRADES ASSOCIATION, A. F. OF L., SHEBOYGAN, WIS.

Mr. WILEY. Mr. President, I have received from Anthony J. King, secretary-treasurer of the Wisconsin Pipe Trades Association of the American Federation of Labor, a series of resolutions adopted by the convention of the association in June of 1954, at Sheboygan, Wis.

The resolution with which I am most directly concerned, as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, pertains to the views of the membership on the grim subject of the hydrogen bomb. I send to the desk its text, and ask unanimous consent that it be printed at this point in the RECORD, and be thereafter appropriately referred to the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. I believe that this important statement from the grassroots will be of deep interest to my colleagues, as are similar expressions from the rest of our Nation.

There being no objection, the resolution was referred to the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, and ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows: RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY WISCONSIN PIPE TRADES ASSOCIATION AT CONVENTION HELD JUNE 19, 1954, SHEBOYGAN, WIS.

H-BOMB

Whereas the horrible threat of the H-bomb warfare hangs precariously over our civilization and especially over the workers of the great industrial cities of the world, and in the event of such a war they would find themselves utterly helpless unless an avenue of escape and measures of protection were provided: Therefore be it

Resolved, That this convention call upon the President of the United States to continue forthrightedly to reveal the great dangers of atomic warfare so that the people are made more aware of it than they are at present; and be it further

Resolved, That this convention support a strong and comprehensive civil-defense program in city, State, and Nation to insure that the worker especially will be protected; and be it further

Resolved, That we call upon the President to develop an effective bipartisan policy for foreign affairs in a fashion that will win us friends among the free nations; and be it

Resolved, Also that we support an aggressive effective program of international inspection and control of atomic energy under a joint control such as the United Nations or similar organizations; and be it further Resolved, That we call upon the shackled workers in totalitarian states and countries, urging them to break their chains and to make their masters realize that they will not support an H-bomb war against American workers.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs; with amendments (Rept. No. 1802).

By Mr. SCHOEPPEL, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce:

on

S. 904. A bill to standardize rates household goods shipped by the United States Government for its employees; with amendments (Rept. No. 1803).

By Mr. BUTLER, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce:

S. 3219. A bill to amend certain provisions of title XI of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended, to facilitate private financing of new-ship construction, and for other purposes; with amendments (Rept. No. 1804).

By Mr. DUFF, from the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, with amendments:

S. 3630. A bill to permit the city of Philadelphia to further develop the Hog Island

tract as an air, rail, and marine terminal

by directing the Secretary of Commerce to release the city of Philadelphia from the fulfillment of certain conditions contained in the existing deed which restrict further development (Rept. No. 1805); and

S. 3713. A bill to give effect to the International Convention for the High Seas Fisheries of the North Pacific Ocean, signed at Tokyo, May 9, 1952, and for other purposes (Rept. No. 1806).

By Mr. AIKEN, from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, without amendment:

H. R. 4928. A bill to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to convey a certain parcel of land to the city of Clifton, N. J. (Rept. No. 1808); and

H. R. 6263. A bill to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to convey certain lands in Alaska to the Rotary Club of Ketchikan, Alaska (Rept. No. 1809).

By Mr. ANDERSON, from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry:

S. 3339. A bill to authorize the Farm Credit Administration to make loans of the type formerly made by the Land Bank Commissioner; with an amendment (Rept. No. 1807).

PRINTING OF ADDITIONAL COPIES OF SENATE REPORT NO. 1064, RELATING ΤΟ JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

Mr. JENNER, from the Committee on Rules and Administration, to which was referred the resolution (S. Res. 264), submitted by Mr. HENDRICKSON on June 22, 1954, reported it favorably, without amendment, and it was considered and agreed to, as follows:

Resolved, That there be printed for the use of the Committee on the Judiciary 2,500 additional copies of Senate Report No. 1064, 83d Congress, 2d session, entitled "Juvenile Delinquency.”

FUNERAL EXPENSES OF THE LATE SENATOR HUGH BUTLER OF NEBRASKA

Mr. JENNER, from the Committee on The following reports of committees Rules and Administration, to which was were submitted:

By Mr. JENNER, from the Committee on Rules and Administration:

S. Res. 270. Resolution to amend Senate

Resolution 225 of the 83d Congress, relative to investigation of employee welfare and pension funds under collective-bargaining agreements, by increasing funds therefor; with an amendment (Rept. No. 1801); and

S. Res. 271. Resolution providing for an investigation of critical raw materials by

referred the resolution (S. Res. 275), submitted by Mrs. BoWRING on July 7, 1954, reported it favorably, without amendment, and it was considered and agreed to, as follows:

Resolved, That the Secretary of the Senate hereby is authorized and directed to pay from the contingent fund of the Senate the actual and necessary expenses incurred by the committee appointed to arrange for and attend the funeral of Hon. Hugh Butler, late

a Senator from the State of Nebraska, on vouchers approved by the Committee on Rules and Administration.

PRINTING OF ADDITIONAL COPIES OF SENATE REPORT NO. 1627, RELATING TO ACCESSIBILITY OF STRATEGIC AND CRITICAL MATERIALS

Mr. JENNER, from the Committee on Rules and Administration, to which was referred the resolution (S. Res. 277), submitted by Mr. MALONE on July 12, 1954, reported it favorably, without amendment, and it was considered and agreed to, as follows:

Resolved, That there be printed for the use of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs 3,000 additional copies of Senate Report No. 1627, 83d Congress, relative to accessibility of strategic and critical materials to the United States in time of war and for our expanding economy.

PRINTING OF ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THE SLIP LAW FOR THE INTERNAL REVENUE CODE OF 1954 Mr. JENNER, from the Committee on Rules and Administration, to which was referred the concurrent resolution (H. Con Res. 250), reported it favorably, without amendment, and it was considered and agreed to, as follows:

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That there be printed 12,590 additional copies of the slip law for the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, of which 2,475 copies shall be for the use of the Senate, 500 copies for the use of the Committee on Finance, 6,615 copies for the use of the House of Representatives, and 3,000 copies for the use of the Committee on Ways and Means.

ENROLLED BILLS PRESENTED

The Secretary of the Senate reported that on today, July 14, 1954, he presented to the President of the United States the following enrolled bills:

S. 1303. An act to provide for the expeditious naturalization of former citizens of the United States who have lost United States citizenship by voting in a political election or plebiscite held in occupied Japan;

S. 3378. An act to revise the Organic Act of the Virgin Islands of the United States;

and

S. 3480. An act to amend section 24 of the Federal Reserve Act, as amended.

BILLS INTRODUCED Bills were introduced, read the first time, and, by unanimous consent, the second time, and referred as follows: By Mr. FERGUSON:

S. 3743. A bill to provide for the recruitment and training of Foreign Service Officers; to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

(See the remarks of Mr. FERGUSON When he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. CASE (for himself and Mr.
MUNDT):

S. 3744. A bill to change the name of Gavins Point Reservoir back of Gavins Point Dam to Lewis and Clark Lake; to the Committee on Public Works.

(See the remarks of Mr. CASE when he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. JENNER:

S. 3745. A bill to establish rules of interpretation governing questions of the effect of acts of Congress on State laws; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

(See the remarks of Mr. JENNER when he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. LANGER:

S. 3746. A bill to authorize the employment in a civilian position in the Department of Justice of Maj. Gen. Frank H. Partridge, United States Army, retired, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. CASE:

S. 3747. A bill to provide for the acquisition by the United States of lands required for the reservoir to be created by the construction of the Fort Randall Dam on the Missouri River, and to provide for rehabilitation of the Sioux Indians of the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota; and

S. 3748. A bill to provide for the acquisition by the United States of lands required for the reservoir to be created by the construction of the Fort Randall Dam on the Missouri River, and to provide for rehabilitation of the Sioux Indians of the Lower Brule

Indian Reservation in South Dakota; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. By Mr. DOUGLAS:

S. 3749. A bill for the relief of Gong Poy, also known as Fred Gong; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

FOREIGN SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP

TRAINING PROGRAM

Mr. FERGUSON. Mr. President, I introduce for appropriate reference a bill to provide for the recruitment and training of Foreign Service officers. I ask unanimous consent that the bill, together with a statement by me, and an article from the Washington Star of July 13, 1954, written by Gould Lincoln, entitled "Plan Would Strengthen Foreign Service Setup," be printed in the RECORD.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The bill will be received and appropriately referred; and, without objection, the bill, statement, and article will be printed in the

RECORD.

The bill (S. 3743) to provide for the recruitment and training of Foreign Service officers, introduced by Mr. FERGUSON, was received, read twice by its title, referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations, and ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That this act may be cited as the "Foreign Service Scholarship Training Program Act."

SEC. 2. The Congress hereby declares that the objectives of this act are to provide the Foreign Service with a more constant flow of qualified candidates for appointment, who shall be chosen from among the best young men and women America produces, who shall have been carefully trained for their future work, and who are representative citizens of the United States.

SEC. 3. A Foreign Service scholarship training program is hereby established, which shall be administered by the Secretary of State, in accordance with the provisions of this act.

SEC. 4. No person shall be enrolled in the scholarship training program unless he or she

(a) has been a citizen of the United States for at least 8 years;

(b) has completed 2 years of scholastic work at an accredited college or university;

(c) has passed such examinations and aptitude tests as the Secretary of State may prescribe;

(d) will not be more than 27 years of age on July 1 of the calendar year in which he or she will have successfully completed the 2 years of scholarship training provided by this act; or

(e) has entered into a contractual arrangement with the Secretary of State, or his designated representative, acting for and on behalf of the United States, in which said individual agrees

(1) to pursue his studies for the next 2 years under the supervision and guidance of the Secretary of State,

(2) upon completion of his college training, to accept appointment as a Foregin Service officer or Foreign Service Reserve officer, if offered, and

(3) having accepted such appointment, to serve continuously as a Foreign Service officer or Foreign Service Reserve officer for a period of at least 4 years, unless sooner released by the Secretary of State in accordance with the provisions of the Foreign Service Act of 1946.

In the event an individual is a minor, such contract shall be entered into only with the consent of his or her parent or legal guardian. The Secretary of State may release any individual from such contractual obligation and may separate the individual from the training program at any time that, in the opinion of the Secretary of State, the best interest of the Service requires such action.

SEC. 5. The Secretary of State is authorized to make a Federal grant-in-aid of not to exceed $900 per year to any person enrolled in the Foreign Service scholarship training program for the purposes of defraying expenses for each of 2 years at an ac

credited college or university of the trainee's choice, and in addition to pay necessary travel expenses in connection with examinations for entrance into the Foreign Service, provided that such person continues in status, and provided further that the individual consistently stands in the upper 25 percent of his class, except that the Secretary of State may, in his discretion, waive the provision with respect to a trainee's standing in his class.

SEC. 6. The Secretary of State shall, during the second quarter of the calendar year in which a participant in the training program expects to complete his or her scholastic training, cause to be examined the record of each participant who applies prior to April 1 of that year to take the examinations for appointment in the Foreign Service for the purpose of determining the applicants who appear suitable for appointment to the Foreign Service. Persons deemed suitable shall take such comprehensive examinations as may be prescribed by the board of examiners pursuant to section 516 of the Foreign Service Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 1008), and, if successful, shall be eligible for appointment as a Foreign Service officer, by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate: Provided, That participants who have completed their training under this act may be given temporary appointments as Foreign Service Reserve officers, pending completion of the examination process and appointment as a Foreign Service officer if recommended.

SEC. 7. There shall be admitted each year to the Foreign Service scholarship training program 200 qualified trainees designated by the President, and 1 trainee for each Senator, Representative, Delegate in Congress, Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, and President of the Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia. Each such Senator, Representative, Delegate, Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, and President of the Board of Commissioners may nominate annually 1 candidate and 1 first and 1 second alternate candidate. If the first

nominee fails to qualify, the appointment shall be given to the first alternate, if he qualifies, and if not to the second alternate, if he qualifies. In the event any of the above-named officials of the Government fail to nominate candidates or if their nominees and first and second alternates fail to qualify the President may designate candidates in lieu thereof, such designations to be in addition to the 200 hereinbefore authorized.

SEC. 8. The Secretary of State may prescribe rules and regulations to effectuate the purposes of this act.

SEC. 9. There are hereby authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this act.

The statement by Senator FERGUSON is as follows:

STATEMENT BY SENATOR FERGUSON TO ACCOMPANY PROPOSED LEGISLATION FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF A FOREIGN SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM

In this era of the "cold war" the Foreign Service of the United States is in the front line of America's defense against Communist imperialism. Secretary Dulles has called the Foreign Service our first line of defense in time of peace. Its officers, staffing posts all over the globe, make up a relatively small force in view of the power and size of the great Nation it represents. Yet, this virtual handful of dedicated American men and women is charged with carrying out policies which may determine the welfare and security of our country for decades to come. Indeed, elementary wisdom would seem to dictate a most careful selection and training of the young people to whom we are to entrust such grave responsibilities.

The Congress in the past, through various legislative actions, has shown its concern for the calibre of our Foreign Service personnel. It has sought to promote a broadening of the base of recruitment so that capable Americans from all parts of our country, and regardless of financial status could be given an opportunity to serve in our diplomatic corps. The responsibility of Congress in this field has been recognized as going far beyond its functions of confirming nominations to the Service by the executive branch. It begins with the legislation which regulates the manner in which the Executive can draw upon the resources of talent, intelligence, and experience of the young people of our Nation.

Therefore, it is prudent in this time of international tensions to examine whether our present procedures of recruitment for the Foreign Service are adequate to the needs of the country.

Do they tend to produce a diplomatic service of the calibre and stature which the United States requires for its worldwide and growing responsibilities, interests and commitments?

Do they adequately attract candidates from all parts of the Nation so that the best representative sampling of America can be known by peoples abroad?

Do they provide an incentive for persons with the technical skills required in present day diplomacy?

Do they provide a place for the men with much talent but little money?

The answers to these and similar questions have been sought periodically either by the Congress or by committees of the executive branch. And these inquiries have produced valuable knowledge leading to improvements in the past in the direction and management of the Foreign Service.

The most recent of these studies was conducted by the Secretary of State's Public Committee on Personnel, under the able Chairmanship of Dr. Henry M. Wriston, president of Brown University. The Committee's report was just made public last month.

While the report is a comprehensive appraisal of the personnel operations of the State Department and the Foreign Service, I want to address myself here particularly to those findings and recommendations of the Committee which concern the problems of recruitment for the Foreign Service. I do so as chairman of the subcommittee on State Department organization of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and beIcause the execution of some of the most effective of these recommendations requires congressional action. Although it is now late in the session and much important work is still to be accomplished, I am bringing legislative proposals on this matter before the Senate at this time. I trust this will emphasize the urgency and importance which I attach to consideration of the problems of our diplomatic service.

Let me return for a moment to the questions I posed previously on the present state of recruitment for the Foreign Service. Does the system work as it should?

I refer you to the words of the Wriston committee report which maintains that, "As a mechanism for supplying the Foreign Service with a continuous and adequate inflow of junior officers * * (the present system of recruitment) has proved timeconsuming and increasingly defective."

The committee's report also states that the present examination cystem has produced an officer corps which "is not geographically representative, nor adequately reflective of the wide and essential variety of American life, nor sufficiently diversified in the technical skills required in present day diplomacy."

Nor does the present system promote the aim of the Congress as expressed by the framers of the Foreign Service Act of 1946, that recruitment should be on the basis of merit "regardless of the possession of private means." According to the Wriston committee, the present system is "an undue hardship upon those without such means."

Fortunately, the committee did not confine its activities to fact-finding alone. It is apparent from the report that its members brought to their task an exceptional degree of insight and imagination. The specific and forthright recommendations which they proposed should go far, when implemented, toward rectifying the faults and inadequacies of the present system of recruitment for the American diplomatic service.

One of these recommendations I consider particularly noteworthy as an example of a fresh approach to an old problem. I propose to introduce legislation herewith to give it effect. That is the recommendation for the establishment of a Foreign Service scholarship training program. It is, as the committee says, "a fundamentally new method of recruitment, designed to provide the Foreign Service with a more constant flow of qualified candidates representing the different segments of American life."

Let me outline for you briefly the main provisions of this proposed recruitment device which is intended to supplement and encourage-but not altogether supplantthe present methods of entrance into the Service through examinations.

Essentially, the Foreign Service scholarship training program would be based on the idea of the Navy's Reserve Officer Training Corps contract system, a recruitment method tested and proven highly successful. It would be administered throughout the States and Territories by the Secretary of State through the agency of the Foreign Service Institute, which, according to other recommendations of the committee, would also be enhanced and strengthened.

Candidates for the scholarships would be chosen from all the States of the Union, the Territories, and the District of Columbia on the basis of examinations prescribed by the Secretary of State.

Candidates who qualify would be enlisted into a 2-year training program at the end of

their sophomore year of college, and would be offered a Federal grant of $900 a year to permit them to complete their studies at an accredited institution of higher learning of their own choice. To remain eligible for the second year of the scholarship program they would have to maintain their standing in the upper 25 percent of their class. Appointees to the scholarships would also agree to serve in the Foreign Service, if finally eligible for appointment to it, for a period of at least 4 years.

Appointment to the Foreign Service Officer Corps itself would-as at present-be on the basis of competitive examination. These examinations, which would remain open as well to candidates who had not participated in the scholarship program-would be held under State Department auspices in the various States and Territories-thereby equalizing their availability to candidates regardless of their proximity to Washington or their financial means. It is expected that during the first year the total cost of the scholarship program would amount to about $1 million, and would eventually reach about $2 million a year, a small price indeed for a program that will go so far toward developing the finest kind of Foreign Service.

Another provision of the legislation which I will propose, and one also based partly on experience with officer recruitment for our armed services, is that following appropriate examination approximately two-thirds of the appointments to the scholarship training program would be made by Members of Congress, and the remainder by the President of the United States.

Some apprehension may be felt that the choice of candidates to the proposed training program might be influenced by political considerations with a consequent bias introduced into the future officer corps. I am confident, in the light of our experience with appointments to West Point and Annapolis, that we should discount such fears and not permit them to dissuade us from taking this progressive step in Foreign Service recruiting.

On the contrary, I foresee many decided advantages to be derived from this method of appointment. Let me say first, that I have been informed that the President and the Secretary of State welcome the more active participation and interest of the Congress in this matter. The executive branch sees therein a means to aid in promoting greater cooperation between the two branches of government on matters concerning our diplomatic establishment. It foresees also increased public confidence and a closer feeling on the part of the public of identification with the Foreign Service, as well as increased interest in its activities. I might add here that in its report the Wriston committee made the strongest recommendations that whatever the method, the aim of a reformed recruitment program should be a Foreign Service reflecting national characteristics, with its roots among all the people. I can conceive of no other method so well designed to achieve this objective as the Foreign Service scholarship program, which will reach into every corner of our country and draw on the best available young men and women to serve our Nation in diplomatic posts abroad.

Under the proposed program a happy balance can be struck in the training of our future statesmen since the Department of State will be able to help in directing the course of study without sacrificing the welcome diversity of background provided by our colleges and universities in all parts of the country. Also, new candidates for the Foreign Service, while benefiting from a somewhat more specialized training in foreign affairs under this program, would not lose the advantages of the first 2 years of general academic training.

It should be recognized that if this program is put into effect the general character

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