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AUTUMNAL NIGHTFALL. Round Autumn's mouldering urn, Loud mourns the chill and cheerless gale, When nightfall shades the quiet vale,

And stars in beauty burn.

'Tis the year's eventide.
The wind --like one that sighs in pain
O'er joys that ne'er will bloom again,

Mourns on the far hill-side.

And yet my pensive eye
Rests on the faint blue mountain long,
And for the fairy-land of song,

That lies beyond, I sigh,

The moon unveils her brow;
In the mid-sky her urn glows bright,
And in her sad and mellowing light

The valley sleeps below.

Upon the hazel gray
The lyre of Autumn hangs unstrung,
And o'er its tremulous chords are flung

The fringes of decay.

I stand deep musing here,
Beneath the dark and motionless beech,
Whilst wandering winds of nightfall reach

My melancholy ear.

The air breathes chill and free;
A Spirit, in soft music calls
From Autumn's gray and moss-grown halls,

And round her withered tree.

light, and perhaps elicit from others some And wash away the blood-stain there.

Why should I guard, from wind and sun, fight, upon important facts. We have no

This cheek, whose virgin rose is fled, room to make an analysis of its contents;

It was for one-oh, only onebut would briefly present some considera

I kept its bloom, and he is dead. tions which they suggest to us. For General Hull's surrender of his forces and posts But they who slew him-unaware

Of coward murderers lurking nighto the British, he was tried and condemned

And left him to the fowls of air, to death as a coward; and he lives to tell

Are yet alive--and they must die. his story through the mercy of the Execu

They slew him--and my virgin years tive. Whether he has wholly justified his Are vowed to Greece and vengeance now; surrender without a battle, may be deter- And many an Othman dame, in tears, mined differently by different persons. We

Shall rue the Grecian maiden's vow. suppose that most readers will agree that

I touched the lute in better days, bis conduct could be accounted for without

I led in dance the joyous band ;charging with cowardice or treachery, one Ah! they may move to mirthful lays to whom Washington entrusted important Whose hands can touch a lover's hand. commands. He has sufficiently shown that

The march of hosts that haste to meet

Seems gayer than the dance to me; much more than his due of punishment

The lute's sweet tones are not so sweet visited his share of the follies, improvidence,

As the fierce shout of victory. B. and misconduct, wbich characterized that astonishing campaign. We feel no kind of hostility to General Dearborn, and have no

[It is perhaps due to our readers, to inform them acquaintance with, and no personal feelings that the following pieces, and others with a similar towards General Hull; we know that we signature, are from a small manuscript volume of are unprejudiced, and believe all who are poetry written by the late Rev. Mr Eastburn, one so, will agree with us in thinking that some of the authors of " Yamoyden.” As we have sething of a load lies upon General Dear- lelected many of these poems for our columns, it born, which he will do well to throw off as soon as may be. General Hull lost all he may be improper that we should express more dis

tinctly our opinion of their merit. Had we not had ;-General Dearborn did nothing thought that they would gratify our readers, and achieved nothing-suffered nothing; and so far, perhaps, he had the best of it. But we support the reputation of their author, we certainly do not recollect that General Dearborn has of the gentleman by whose means we have obtain.

should not have availed ourselves of the kindness ever explained the singular lapse of mem

ed them.--EDITOR.) ory during which he relieved himself from the peril of a British force, and left that

THE PROSPECT OF DEATH. force to go en masse upon General Hulle

When sailing on this troubled sea who was likely to have enough to encoun

Of pain, and tears, and agony, ter without this addition. But when Hull

Though wildly roar the waves around, was tried, and Dearborn tried him, why With restless and repeated sound, was the affair of Washington forgotten? 'Tis sweet to think that on our eyes Whoever was guilty there, was answerable

A lovelier clime shall yet arise ; somewhere; and it would be rather difficult

That we shall wake from sorrow's dream

Beside a pure and living stream. to persuade any one just now, that the loss of Detroit and of all Hull's posts, afforded Yet we must suffer, here below, more proof of cowardice or treachery than Unnumbered pangs of grief and wo; that misconduct-whatever be its true name

Nor must the trembling heart repine,

But all, unto its God resign; or nature-which lost Washington. Gen

In weakness and in pain made knowi, eral Hull has shown that there was other

His powerful mercy shall be shown, opposition arrayed against him than that Until the fight of faith is o'er, which arose from his military faults. But And earth shall vex the soul no more! they mistook their man. He was not a suf

E ficient scape-goat ; he could not bear away all the disgrace and punishment due to the military managers of that play-and par

PART OF THE XIXth PSALM. ticularly to them who conducted the flight The glittering heaven's refulgent glow, of Bladensburgh.

And sparkling spheres of golden light,
Jehovah's work and glory show,

By burning day, or gentle night.

In silence :hrough the vast profound
POETRY.

They move their orbs of fire on high,

Nor speech, nor word, nor answering sound, SONG OF THE GRECIAN AMAZON.

Is heard upon the tranquil sky :

Yet to the earth's remotest bar I buckle to my slender side

Their burning glory, all is known; The pistol and the scimetar,

Their living light has sparkled far,
And in my maiden flower and pride

And on the attentive silence shone.
Am come to share the tasks of war.
And yonder stands my fiery steed,

God 'mid their shining legions rears
That paws the ground and neighs to go,

A tent where burns the radiant sun; My charger of the Arab breed,

As, like a bridegroom bright, appears I took him from the routed foe.

The monarch, on his course begun;

From end to end of azure heaven My mirror is the mountain spring,

He holds his very path along, At which I dress my ruffled hair;

The hoar and mantled Oak,
With moss and twisted ivy brown,
Bends in its lifeless beauty down

Where weeds the fountain choke.

That fountain's hollow voice Echoes the sound of precious things;Of early feeling's tuneful springs

Choked with our blighted joys.

Leaves, that the night-wind bears To earth's cold bosom with a sigh, Are types of our mortality,

And of our fading years.

The tree that shades the plain,
Wasting and hoar as time decays,
Spring shall renew with cheerful days,-
But not my joys again.

H. W. L.

-N.

INTELLIGENCE.

MUSICAL BAROMETER.

A gentleman, at Burkil, not far from Bâsle, in Switzerland, by the name of Ventain, invented some years ago a sort of musical barometer, called, in the German, wetter harfe, weather harp, or riesen harfe, giant harp, which possesses the singular property of indicating changes of the weather by musical tones. This gentleman was in the habit of amusing himself by shooting at a mark from his window, and that he might not be obliged to go after the mark at every shot, he fixed a piece of iron wire to it, so as to be able to draw it to him at pleas

He frequently remarked that this wire gave musical tones sounding exactly

To all his circling heat is given, My dimmed and dusty arms I bring,

His radiance flames the spheres among.

ure.

THE NIGER.

NEWLY DISCOVERED REPTILE.

mosa.

GREEK NEWSPAPERS.

an octave; and he found that an iron wire,

called Babar Dibber, or the sea of Ghimbaextended in a direction parallel to the me- Mr Dupuis, in his work upon Ashantee, ba. The Dibber is very large, and in the ridian, gave this tone every time the wind lately published, says of the course of this season of rain the land on the opposite side, changed. A piece of brass wire gave no mysterious river, that he never heard of two although high, is not discernible. Beyond sound, nor did an iron wire extended east different opinions with regard to its termina- Jenny, the river, at the opposite outlet of and west. In consequence of these obser- tion. “South or north of the great desert, in the lake, inclines to the north till it reachvations a musical barometer was construct- Wangara or Mauritania, the sentiments es Timbuctoo. From thence its track is ed. In the year 1787, Capt. Hans, of Bâsle, were the same, that the great flow of water easterly to Ghou, having then traversed made one in the following manner :-Thir is easterly to the Egyptian Nile. Yet it the district of Fillany. From Ghou it enteen pieces of iron wire, each three hundred must be confessed that none of my instruct ters Marroa, passing through Corimen, and twenty feet long, were extended from ers had ever tracked its course beyond the Kaby, and Zamberina, as it inclines with a his summer-house to the outer court, cross- western limits of Bournou. It was an or- southerly fall to the Youry, and the lake ing a garden. They were placed about thodox opinion, that the Shady, as well as of Noufy. two inches apart; the largest were two the Koara, united its waters with innumeralines in diameter, the smallest only one, ble other large and small rivers (like the and the others about one and a half; they Amazon), which contributed to replenish were on the side of the house, and made its channel in the dry season, when it usual.

M. Marion has found, in the island of an angle of twenty or thirty degrees with ly tracks its course mildly; and in the sea.

Manilla, a species of reptile of the family the horizon; they were stretched and kept son of rain, when it runs in tempestuous of the Agamoides

, which has the faculty of tight by wheels made for that purpose. eddies, sweeping off in its current whole changing colour, like the camelion.

Its Every time the weather changes these wires islands of matted vegetation.

The Mos- head is triangular, pretty large in propormake so much noise that it is impossible to lems of Kong and Manding commonly used tion to the body; the tail long and slender; continue concerts in the parlour, and the the term Wangara, as relating to Ashian- along the back, the crest or ridge is formsound resembles that of a tea-urn when tee, Dahomy, and 'Benin, east of the For- ed of soft scales, and under the throat is a boiling, sometimes that of a harmonicon, a Of the Niger, well known to them goitre. The feet have tves, detached and distant bell, or an organ. In the opin- by its Bambira name, Jolliba, they report- very unequal; the scales are mostly trianion of the celebrated chemist, Dobereiner. ed to this effect: that it has its source in a gular, imbricated, and especially those of as stated in the Bulletin Technologique, chain of mountains, which bears west and the tail. The iris is blackish, bordered with this is an electro-magnetical phenomenon. something north of the capital of Kong,

a little white circle about the pupil. The from whence it is distant eighteen journeys animal is very active, and feeds on insects.

According to this estimation, I conceive its When the author first came into possession The following newspapers are now pub- fountain may exist in about 11° 15' latitude of it, its colour, for twenty-four hours, was lished in Greece: At Missolonghi, the north, and 7° 10 longitude west of the a delicate green, whether held in the dark, Greek Chronicle (in Greek), and the Greek meridian of Greenwich. The intermediate or exposed to the sun,—whether kept mo

Telagraph (in several languages);-at Hy- space comprises a part of the district call- tionless or in a state of agitation : but next dra, The Friend of the Laws (in Greek);- ed Ganowa, inhabited by the Manding and morning, on removing it from the inside of at Athens, the Athens Free Press (in Falah [Foulah] tribes. The surface, for a bamboo, where it had been placed, its Greek);- at Psara, The Psara Newspaper the first five or six days, they relate, is in- colour throughout had changed to carine(in Greek). All the above, in consequence clining to hilly, yet it is by no means ab- lite; when exposed to the air, this colour of an arrangement made, may now be ob- rupt; and forests alternately abound, but gradually disappeared, and the animal re

On this ground, certained in England by orders through the they are not so impervious as those of Ashan- sumed its green robe English Foreign Post Office.

After the first hundred miles, the tain brown lines were soon after visible : traveller commences ascending a cluster the animal was then replaced in the bamof lofty mountains, and this labour occupies boo, but on drawing it out, it had acquired

him six days. The mountains abound in a bluish green colour, and it was only in The New Monthly Magazine speaks in rivers and rapid torrents, which discharge the open air that the brownish tints rethe following terms of this work, which is themselves on the opposite sides into the turned; and at length, without any variaso deservedly high in favour with the Jolliba, and further to the westward they tion of form or position, the brown colour American public.

are so high and steep that no man can as- gave place to a uniform green, intermin“We are happy to find that the book- cend to their summits, which are barren, gled, however, with some brownish streaks. stores of America are beginning to furnish bleak, and oftentimes covered with snow.

When laid on green or red substances, no us with some good novels, in return for the They are inhabited about half

way up by grain of colour was observed. numerous cargoes with which Paternoster- ferocious tribes of cannibals. The source row has supplied the transatlantic market. of the river lies about two days' distance Mr Brown and Mr Cooper are well and up the mountains, and is distant from Con- All publishers of books throughout the deservedly known to the English public, and nassy thirty-eight journeys, or about five United States, are very earnestly requested we anticipate an equal reputation for the hundred British miles, horizontal. The author of the present volumes. The story river in the neighbourhood, at the head of

to forward to us, regularly and seasonably, of Redwood possesses little of the powerful the mountains, is a small rapid stream

full the names of all works of every kind, prewriting and well-imagined situations which of cataracts, which foam over a bed of paring for publication, in the press, or characterize the novels of the former writ- rocky ground, where it would not be possi. recently published. As they will be iner, and nothing of the historical interest ble to float a canoe. which gives so much

value to the works of siderable distance among the valleys and serted in the Gazette, it is particularly the latter. It much more nearly resembles broken ground, until it has cleared the desired that the exact titles be stated at the tales of Miss Edgeworth, in its pleas- mountains, which it leaves far to the south, length. ant, and, we believe, accurate delineation as it explores a channel on the plains of of domestic manners. Redwood is a reli- Melly. On the confines of Bambara, it

*** The proprietors of Newspapers, for gious novel, but there is nothing like big- is already a large river, occasioned by the which this Gazette is exchanged, and of otry or fanaticism in the opinions of the junction of many other rivers of almost which the price is less than that of the writer, who displays a spirit of very liberal equal magnitude, and whose sources are in and rational piety." -- We ought to add, these mountains. It passes Yamina, Sata- Gazette, are expected to pay the differthat the style of Redwood is good, and the na, and Sago, to Massina and Jenny; be-ence. story interesting." yond which it spreads into a large lake,

C. H. & Co.

tee.

REDWOOD.

ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY-ANCIENT AND

MODERN

UNIVERSAL GAZETTEER. A NEW AND GREAT

LY IMPROVED EDITION.

Plate of the Solar System, for the use of WORCESTER'S GEOGRAPHICAL and from other works, continually excite Young Children. Fourth Edition.

WORKS.

and gratify the curiosity of the reader.” Cummings' Questions on the New Testa

Christian Spectator. ment, for Sabbath Exercises in Schools and

<< We consider the Sketches' well suited Academies, with four Maps of the countries

to give a large fund of entertainment and through which our Saviour and his Apos

instruction to the youthful mind.”. tles travelled. CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. have

North American Review. Pronouncing Spelling Book. By J. A. published a new and much improved edi- « We know of no book which would be Cummings. Third Edition. This Spelling tion of this work. The Geography is print- more suitable to be read by scholars in our Book contains every word of common use ed in a handsome style, and a new map of higher schools, and which would excite in our language, that is difficult either to the Eastern and Middle States is added to more interest in the family circle." spell or pronounce. The pronunciation is the Atlas.

R. I. American. strictly conformed to that of Walker's

“ These volumes are extremely enter

Extracts from Reviews, &c. Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, and is so

taining, and may be recommended to the exactly and peculiarly denoted, that no one,

“ Mr Worcester's Geography appears to

perusal of those even, who conceive themus a most excellent manual. It is concise, selves to be past the necessity of elemenwho knows the powers of the letters, can mistake the true pronunciation.

well arranged, free from redundancies and tary instruction.”—Christian Examiner. The New Testament, with References, repetitions, and contains exactly what it

" The Sketches' &c. form a most valuaand a Key Sheet of Questions, historical

, should, a brief outline of the natural and ble companion to the Elements of Geogradoctrinal, and practical, designed to facili- political characteristics of each country. phy,' admirably calculated to interest the tate the acquisition of Scriptural knowl. The tabular views are of great value.”

attention, and impart useful knowledge to

North American Revier. edge in Bible-Classes and Sunday Schools,

our youth."-Roberts Vaux, Esq. Common Schools, and private Families. By

“We consider the work, in its present “The work is, in my opinion, ably exeHervey Wilbur, A. M. Second edition, state, as the best compend of Geography cuted, and well fitted to be both popular stereotype.

for the use of schools, which has appeared and useful."--Rev. Dr S. Miller. The Bible Class-Book ; or Biblical Cate in our country.” chism, containing Questions historical, doc

Monthly Literary Journal. trinal, practical, and experimental, design- “ From a careful examination of thy Geed to promote an intimate acquaintance ography, and a comparison of the work with the Inspired Volume. By Hervey with other productions of like character, I

Extracts from Reviews, fc. Wilbur, A. M. Thirteenth edition. Stereo am led to the opinion that it is the most

“ The authorities which Mr Worcester type.

valuable system of elementary geography specifies, are certainly those most worthy C. H. & Co. have a great variety of Bi. published in our country.”

of reliance. We have ourselves used his bles, Testaments, Spelling Books, Diction

Roberts Vaux, Esq.

Gazetteer for some time past, and we conaries, &c. Also, Inkstands, Qnills, Draw

tinue to regard it as by far the most accu

“I have no hesitation in expressing it as ing Paper, Writing Paper, Ink, Penknives,

rate, copious, and generally serviceable Scissors, Globes, and all articles usually my opinion, that it contains more valuable work of the kind, which we have ever seen.

matter, and better arranged, than any sim. The second edition comprises Dearly two wanted in Schools.

ilar work of its size I have ever met with.” thousand pages, printed in the neatest manProfessor Adams.

ner, on handsome paper." CATECHISM IN VERSE, FOR THE “ I cannot hesitate to pronounce it, on

National Gazette. USE OF CHILDREN.

the whole, the best compend of geography “ In its present form, it (the Universal

for the use of academies, that I have ever Gazetteer) is, we believe, the most comExtract from Reviews.

Rev. Dr S. Miller.

prehensive geographical dictionary that In this little work pure devotion and morality are expressed in chaste, and often

“Of all the elementary treatises on the can be called a manual, and we think it beautiful poetical language. The questions subject which have been published, I have would be difficult to name a work in two are comprehensive, and are answered in seen none with which I am, on the whole, volumes, in which more information is conHymns of considerable length, each verse

so well pleased, and which I can so cheer- tained. We are disposed to regard it as of which, however, forms a distinct reply. fully recommend to the public.”

freer from defects than any other work of President Tyler.

the kind before the public. We highly recommend this unassuming

“ The typographical execution is unusulittle book to the notice of parents and in

ally neat and sightly, and the whole work structers.Balt. Unitarian Miscellany.

forms a repository of geographical and sta

tistical information, greater, we apprehend, We think the plan, and the general style of execution, adapted to render it a valua- Comprising a description of the Grand than is elsewhere condensed into the same ble book in the religious instruction of chil- Features of Nature; the principal Moun-compass.”—North American Review. dren. The poems which follow the cate- tains, Rivers, Cataracts, and other interestchism are not particularly suited to chil- ing Objects and Natural Curiosities; also

NEW SCHOOL BOOK. dren, but are adapted to give pleasure to of the Chief Cities and Remarkable Edi- Derio, CLARKE, & Tyler, of Greenfield, all who have a taste for descriptive and fices and Ruins ; together with a view of Mass., have lately published moral poetry. the Manners and Customs of different Na

The Common Reader, consisting of a vaChristian Examiner.

tions; illustrated by One Hundred Engrav. riety of Pieces, Original and Selected, inings.

tended for the use of Schools, and particuThe fourth edition of this Catechism is

Extracts from Reviews, fc.

larly calculated for the improvement of nearly sold, and a fifth is in the press. No “We have attentively perused these Scholars of the First and Second Classes, in better evidence can be wanted of its pop- Sketches,' and have no hesitation in say- the art of Reading. By T. Strong, A. M. ularity.

ing that we know of no similar work, in Third Edition. Sold wholesale and retail, by CUMMINGS, which instruction and amusement are so The Scholar's Guide to the History of Hilliard, & Co. Boston, and A. G. TAN much combined. The accuracy of the the Bible; or an Abridgment of the ScripNATT, & Co. Springfield, Mass.

statements, the brevity and clearness of tures of the Old and New Testament, with Price, $8,00 per bundred, $1,20 per doz. the descriptions, the apposite and often Explanatory Remarks. By T. Strong, A.M. 12 cents single.

beautiful quotations from books of travels For Sale by C. H. & Co.

seen."

SKETCHES OF THE EARTH AND ITS

INHABITANTS.

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SKETCHES OF THE EARTH AND ITS

INHABITANTS.

valuable system of elementary geography of reliance. We have ourselves used his

SCHOOL BOOKS. published in our country.”

Gazetteer for some time past, and we con.
Roberts Vaur, Esq.

Cummings, Hilliard, & Co. No. 1, Corntinue to regard it as by far the most accu“I have no hesitation in expressing it as rate, copious, and generally serviceable hill, have constantly on hand the most valmy opinion, that it contains more valuable work of the kind, which we have ever seen. uable and popular School and Classical inatter, and better arranged, than any sim- The second edition comprises nearly two Books, and furnish Schools and Academies

at wholesale prices. ilar work of its size I have ever met with.” thousand pages, printed in the neatest manProfessor Adams. ner, on handsome paper.”

Among those which they have lately National Gazette.

published are “I cannot hesitate to pronounce it, on

Colburn's Arithmetic and Colburn's Sethe whole, the best compend of geography Gazetteer) is, we believe, the most com

“ In its present form, it (the Universal

quel, both excellent elementary works. for the use of academies, that I have ever

Elements of Astronomy, illustrated witha seen.” Rev. Dr S. Miller.

prehensive geographical dictionary that

can be called a manuul, and we think it Plates, for the use of schools and Acade“Of all the elementary treatises on the would be difficult to name a work in two mies, with Questions. By John H. Wilşubject which have been published, I have volumes, in which more information is con

liams, A. M. Second Edition. seen none with which I am, on the whole, tained. We are disposed to regard it as its Inhabitants, with one hundred Engrar

Worcester's Sketches of the Earth and so well pleased, and which I can so cheer- freer from defects than any other work of fully recommend to the public." the kind before the public.

ings. Designed as a reading book. President Tyler. " The typographical execution is unusu. Lessons in Prose and Verse, för Schools and

Friend of Youth; or New Selection of ally neat and sightly, and the whole work Families, to imbue the young with sentiforms a repository of geographical and statistical information, greater, we apprehend, By Noah Worcester, D. D. Second Edi

ments of piety, humanity, and benevolence. than is elsewhere condensed into the same Comprising a description of the Grand

tion. compass.”_North American Review. Features of Nature; the principal Moun

Cummings' Geography. Ninth Edition. tains, Rivers, Cataracts, and other interest

Worcester's Geography. Third Edition, ing Objects and Natural Curiosities; also

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & CO.

very much improved. of the Chief Cities and Remarkable Edi- HAVE preparing for the Press, by Judge Cummings' First Lessons in Geography fices and Ruins; together with a view of Howe of Northampton, “The Lawyer's and Astronomy, with seven Maps and a the Manners and Customs of different Na- Common-Place Book, with an Alphabetical Plate of the Solar System, for the use of tions; illustrated by One Hundred Engray- Index of most of the Heads which occur in Young Children. Fourth Edition. ings.

general Reading and Practice.” Its object Pronouncing Spelling Book. By J. A. Extracts from Reviews, &c. is to aid the Student, by furnishing to his Cummings. Third Edition. “We have attentively perused these hand a Title, under which he may arrange Cummings' Questions on the New Testa• Sketches,' and have no hesitation in say- nearly every thing he can find an interest ment, for Sabbath Exercises in Schools and ing that we know of no similar work, in in preserviug. The utility of Common- Academies, with four Maps of the countries which instruction and amusement are so Place Books seems to be admitted by all. through which our Saviour and his Aposmuch combined. The accuracy of the Few Lawyers have attained to any consid- tles travelled.

C. H. & Co. have a great variety of Bistatements, the brevity and clearness of erable eminence in the profession without the descriptions, the apposite and often adopting one of some sort. To facilitate bles, Testaments, Spelling Books, Dictionbeautiful quotations from books of travels the use of them so as to induce their adop- aries, &c. Also, Inkstands, Qnills, Drawand from other works, continually excite tion by every individual engaged in profes-ing Paper, Writing Paper, Ink, Penknives, and gratify the curiosity of the reader.”. sional pursuits, is the design of the work.

Scissors, Globes, and all articles usually

wanted in Schools. Christian Spectator. “We consider the “Sketches' well suited

NEW SCHOOL BOOK.
to give a large fund of entertainment and DENIO, CLARKE, & TYLER, of Greenfield,
instruction to the youthful mind."

The Publishers of this Gazette furnish,
Mass., have lately published
North American Review,
The Common Reader, consisting of a va-

on liberal terms, every book and every “We know of no book which would be riety of Pieces, Original and Selected, in- periodical work of any value which America more suitable to be read by scholars in our higher schools, and which would excite larly calculated for the improvement of and make up orders on the tenth of every

tended for the use of Schools, and particu- affords. They have regular correspondents, more interest in the family circle."

Scholars of the First and Second Classes, in month for England and France, and freŘ. I. American.

the art of Reading. By T. Strong, A. M. “ These volumes are extremely enterThird Edition.

quently for Germany and Italy, and import taining, and may be recommended to the perusal of those even, who conceive them the Bible; or an Abridgment of the Scrip- or single copies, for a moderate commis

The Scholar's Guide to the History of from thence to order, books, in quantities selves to be past the necessity of elemen- tures of the Old and New Testament, with sion. Their orders are served by gentle tary instruction.”Christian Examiner.

Explanatory Remarks. By T. Strong, A.M. “ The · Sketches' &c. form a most valua

men well qualified to select the best edi.

For Sale by C. H. & Co. ble companion to the · Elements of Geogra

tions, and are purchased at the lowest cash phy,' admirably calculated to interest the

DAVIS' JUSTICE.

prices. All new publications in any way attention, and impart useful knowledge to our youth."-Roberts Vaux, Esq. CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co. have

noticed in this Gazette, they have for sale, “ The work is, in my opinion, ably exe- lately published, A Practical Treatise up

or can procure on quite as good terms as cuted, and well fitted to be both popular on the Authority and Duty of Justices of those of their respective publishers. and useful." —Rev. Dr S. Miller. the Peace in Criminal Prosecutions. By

CUMMINGS, HILLIARD, & Co.
Daniel Davis, Solicitor General of Massa-
UNIVERSAL GAZETTEER. A NEW AND GREAT- chusetts. Also,
A General Abridgment and Digest of

CAMBRIDGE:
American Law, with occasional Notes and
Extracts from Reviews, fc.

PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS, Comments. By Nathan Dane. LL. D. “ The authorities which Mr Worcester Counsellor at Law-Vols. I. II. III. IV. The

HILLIARD AND METCALF. specifies, are certainly those most worthy | VI. and VII. Vols. in Press.

LY IMPROVED EDITION.

BY

THE UNITED STATES LITERARY GAZETTE.

Published on the first and fifteenth day of every month, by Cummings, Milliard, & Co. No. 1 Cornhill, Boston.-Terms, $5 per annum, payable in July.
Vol. I.
BOSTON, JANUARY 1, 1826.

No. 18.

REVIEWS.

culties, has learned little of its precepts, and a deep feeling of reverence and dependence.

imbibed little of its spirit in the purer days Early associations, as well domestic as poliLetters on the Gospels. By Miss Hannah of bis own being. While we are thus distical and religious, were unreluctantly given Adams. Boston. 1824. 18mo. pp. 216.

posed to ascribe much of the obscurity which up by his followers, wherever they inter

has been charged on Christianity to the state fered at all with the service he required of It has been objected to Christianity, that it of mind of the objector, we as freely ac- them. It was on their part the unheard of is not sufficiently simple for the mass of men; knowledge that there is much in it which service of self-devotion to God, and to man, that its doctrines are obscure, and not always requires explanation. This is particularly with the strange condition and early expereconcilable with one another. It is said, the case with all those parts of it which re- rience, of contempt, hatred, hardship, and more time is required of men to learn the fer to circumstances of place, manners, and suffering. Still it was undertaken and perrule of duty than their condition and occu- character of the age in which Jesus Christ formed. If imperfectly, this was not on acpations allow. It has mysteries, it is added, appeared.

count of any reservation in favour of former which are too deep for comprehension; and, There are two circumstances in its his practice or belief. It was the reservation of nevertheless, these are articles of faith, and tory, about which we shall make a passing nature, and belonged to that infirmity which unless they are believed, the main pillars of remark, not because of any obscurity, but was essential to their human condition. Still Christianity are wanting,ếour faith is vain. because they are parts of its evidence, and a vast change was made, a great effect was

These and other objections are urged because they have a connexion with the re- produced. A new standard of excellence against christianity, by individuals of vari- marks we are about to offeron the work named was given to men, and they were made betous conditions and different ages. They at the head of this article. One of these is ter by it. derive some of their claims to consideration the character, the life, and doctrines of the This effect was produced by the character from the classes who bring them; and there author of the religion, when contrasted with and instructions of Jesus Christ. We have is one class, which, while it furnishes most the times in which he lived. The other is already spoken of the first. It remains to instances, has still other claims on our re- the effect produced by all these on his fol- speak more fully of the last. The prevailing gard. It is the class of the young, who are lowers. Jesus Christ spoke as no man had character of the Gospels, which contain these coming into life; who are making their way ever spoken before, and lived as no man had instructions, is naturalness. They were inin the world; who have good dispositions, ever lived. He is alone amidst his own age, deed accompanied and enforced by miracles. and whose characters are to be much formed and all the preceding. We have no difficulty But these, however wonderful and appalling by things without and around them. The in finding him; and learn nothing of his his- when they were wrought, never occupy the religious character to these is of great value. tory in that of any portion of our race. He front ground. They are subservient and They are within the reach of many and va- is without prejudice, where it was most ex- secondary every where to the instructions, rious influences. There is a joyousness in clusive; a disinterested and wide lover of the doctrines themselves. Jesus Christ did not their natures, which is occupied with every man, where selfishness was a tolerated prin- come to our earth to astonish its inhabitants thing they see and hear. Their natures go ciple both of religion and philosophy. Claim- by his wonderful works. His sole purpose before them in the pursuit of happy things; ing and demonstrating a direct communica- was to exalt and purify the moral nature, and they are never wearied, for variety is tion with beaven, he is poor and houseless and to fit it for the eternity which was its always before them. It is of great conse- on the earth.

destiny. Men were not to be forced into quence to such a state of mind, that the ob- Now this is wholly unlike all that had virtue any more than they bad been before. ject which most interests it, should be of the been known of man before. Human expe- No overwhelming influence is exerted any least questionable character. It must be rience had never met with its likeness. In where in his history. He is said to have obvious and simple, while it is lovely. It all the preceding times men retained some- taught as one having authority; but it was should be lasting in its nature, to corres- thing of the earlier ages, and were fair pro- the authority of knowledge. He knew the pond with the natural freshness which every ducts of their own. Times indeed have their whole extent of moral infirmity, and while day will bring to it. It should be animating livery, but the latest is always some modi- he mourned over the ruin, he loved it; and in its interest, that the tone of the mind be fication of the preceding. Human infirmity was bent on its restoration (the object of his not weakened. It should be of perpetual has descended in an unbroken succession. coming), let the sacrifice to him personally and increasing interest, because the mind It is the strongest feature in the moral crea- be what it might. He knew what it would enlarges with its objects, and when these tion. A moral naturalist would find in it be, and its whole effect on the human race. are exhausted, it will swell over and beyond one of the strong characters by which to With such knowledge, and with such a purthem.

determine and describe the species. Jesus pose, the authority of his instructions was Now Christianity is, of all others, the Christ has not this character of human iden- felt and acknowledged by strangers and by subject itself about which such a state of tity, and in this simple fact, he comes to us friends. His instructions belong, if we may mind may be most safely and usefully em- with an hitherto unknown claim, not merely use the expression, to the mind itself. They ployed. Much that distinguishes it from all to distinction, but to belief.

reach its wants in their utmost extent and others, fits it especially for the susceptibility The miracle of his own character had its variety. They belong to it, because their of our natures when young. It brings dis- effect on the followers of Jesus Christ. It effect is to give to it its higbest dignity; and tinctly into view a character as lovely as rua counter to all their expectations, and thus to fit it for the eternity which they it is elevated ; one who was particularly at disappointed their strongest hopes. But it every where declare to be its portion. They tracted by the beauty and simplicity of our was in beautiful harmony with all they were bring out, and keep in operation the whole nature, as exhibited in the young, and who taught, and with all the preternatural they powers of the mind; for their direct effect is even made children the illustrators of his witnessed. It thus became and continued to give it an interest, and the strongest insublimest doctrines. A work by such an a part, and a most important part of the terest too, in topics wholly intellectual, such author must be fitted for such an age, and evidence on which the claims of Jesus Christ as its own nature and purposes; the being it may be, that he who objects to it its diffil rested. With the belief was closely allied and attributes of God; the means of Korai

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