The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal: Exhibiting a View of the Progressive Discoveries and Improvements in the Sciences and the Arts, Volume 52

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A. and C. Black, 1852 - Science
 

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Page 54 - Son of man, the house of Israel is to me become dross: all they are brass, and tin, and iron, and lead, in the midst of the furnace ; they are even the dross of silver.
Page 70 - It is drawn, and cometh out of the body; yea, the glittering sword cometh out of his gall: terrors are upon him.
Page 313 - Pharaohs, and in rocky folds of Lebanon still untouched by the tool. So long as Ocean exists, there must be disintegration, dilapidation, change ; and should the time ever arrive when the elevatory agencies, motionless and chill, shall sleep within their profound depths, to awaken no more, and should the sea still continue to impel its currents and to roll its waves, every continent and island would at length disappear, and again, as of old, ' when the fountains of the great deep were broken up,'...
Page 313 - Reasoning from what we know,' — and what else remains to us? — an earth without a sea would be an earth without rain, without vegetation, without life, a dead and doleful planet of waste places, such as the telescope reveals to us in the moon. And yet the Ocean does seem peculiarly a creature of time, — of all the great agents of vicissitude and change, the most influential and untiring ; and to a state in which there shall be no vicissitude and no change, — in which the earthquakes shall...
Page 200 - And life, in rare and beautiful forms, Is sporting amid those bowers of stone, And is safe when the wrathful spirit of storms Has made the top of the wave his own...
Page 66 - ... bringing forth into vivid existence its due portion of the illuminating or luciferous element, which element I suppose to be diffused throughout the boundless regions of space, and which in that case must be perfectly exhaustless. "Assuming, therefore, that the sun's light is the result of some peculiar action by which it brings forth into visible existence the element of light, which I conceive to be latent in, and diffused throughout, space, we have but to imagine the existence of a very probable...
Page 343 - The round or buttock of beef of the best quality, having been cut into thin steaks, from which the fat and membranous parts were pared away, was dried in a malt-kiln over an oak fire, until its moisture was entirely dissipated, and the fibre of the meat became friable. It was then ground in a inalt-mill, when it resembled finely grated meat.
Page 158 - London ever since 1844, according to Mr. Glaisher's diagram, and will reach its minimum in 1851. It can be stated only as a conjecture, though by no means an improbable one, that Sir John Franklin entered Lancaster Sound at the close of a group of warm years, when the ice was in the most...
Page 36 - ... their teeth in the accumulation of the calcareous material. Very many of those who discourse quite learnedly on zoophytes and reefs, imagine that the polyps are mechanical workers, heaping up these piles of rock by their united labors ; and science still retains such terms as polypary, polypidom, as if each coral were the constructed hive or house of a swarm of polyps, like the honeycomb of the bee, or. the hillock of a colony of ants.
Page 37 - Coral is never, therefore, an agglutination of grains made by the handywork of the manyarmed polyps: for it is no more an act of labor than bone-making in ourselves. And again, it is not a collection of cells into which the coral animals may withdraw for concealment, any more than the skeleton of a dog is its house or cell : for every part of the coral of a polyp in most reef-making species is enclosed within the polyp, where it was formed by the secreting process.* It is important that this point...

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