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is surely natural enough at the beginning of such a war. It seems that the Northern press are largely responsible for the movement. And here, again, there are good grounds for anything but contempt and hard words. On the news of the defeat, all the best of the Northern papers have acknowledged their error, and formally undertaken to abstain from military criticism. Our own papers are so little in the habit of acknowledging themselves in the wrong, or of abstaining from criticism, however illjudged, on any matter under the sun, that I confess to being rather struck by this action of the American journalists.

While speaking of American journals I may remark that the passages cited in the Times, and other papers, which have so disgusted and angered many of us, are from the New York Herald, a notoriously Southern paper, and one of the most scurrilous journals in the whole States. At the breaking out of the war the office of this paper was with difficulty preserved from destruction. Since that time it has not dared to show its Southern sympathies, but has devoted itself, in the obvious interests of its clients, to the work of embroiling the Northern States with us by its unscrupulous and lying virulence. I quite admit that the tone of the Government and people of the North has been such as deeply to grieve and disappoint every right-minded Englishman; but don't let us saddle them with the frantic slanders of the New York Herald. These must be put in all fairness to the credit of the South.

Hitherto I have been speaking without immediate reference to the great cause in issue. I believe that, apart from that cause, the North are entitled to our good wishes. They are in the right, apart from all question of Slavery. If they really mean to leave "State rights" untouched -if they are not even fighting to keep "the territories" free-if, as we are often told in newspaper articles, Slavery has nothing to say to the war at all-I must repeat that they are emphatically right.

But does anybody seriously believe this? Will any serious person get up

and say, in his own name, or write in his own name, that the meaning of the whole war-the point really at issue, from first to last-has not been, and is not (to put it at the lowest) whether Slavery shall be confined to its present limits in North America, or allowed to extend as and where it can? That was the issue; perhaps it is so still. But those who entered on the war with this as the goal of their hopes and efforts," who would gladly have accepted the limitation of Slavery to its present limits a few months or weeks ago, will, unless they are very different men from what I believe them to be-unless the teaching of all history is vain-not be content now with this compromise. The great cause of freedom will draw them, and the nation after them, along paths which they would never have sought for themselves.

It is the battle of human freedom which the North are fighting, and which should draw to them the sympathy of every Englishman, and make him cast to the winds all Morrill tariffs and angry talk about Canada, all bad manners, and hard words. If the North is beaten, it will be a misfortune such has not come on the world since Christendom arose. An empire will be founded in these Southern States on the simple base of Slavery, having no other starting point or principle whatever than their right to enslave men of their own flesh and blood. It is of no use to speculate upon what the acts and policy of such a State will be. The world will see that soon enough, should it arise. Meantime the Northern States stand alone between us and it, and the greatest misfortune which can happen to us and to mankind will be their defeat.

God grant that they may hold on, and be strong! God grant that they may remember that the greatest triumphs have always come, and must always come, to men through the greatest humiliations. God himself could not set men free but through this rule.

I am yours very truly,

THOMAS HUGHES.

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BABIES' BERCEAU-NETTES, 2 GUINEAS.

Babies' Baskets, 1 Guinea;
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White Dressing Gowns, 1 Guinea;
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