Lincoln and His Cabinet: A Lecture Delivered Before the New Haven Colony Historical Society, Tuesday, March 10, 1896

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Marion Press, 1896 - United States - 72 pages

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Page 40 - If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time save Slavery, I do not agree with them. If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time destroy Slavery, I do not agree with them. My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or destroy Slavery.
Page 41 - I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that. What I do about slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union. I shall do less whenever I shall believe what I am doing hurts the cause, and I shall do more whenever...
Page 40 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could do it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
Page 57 - I don't know. It makes no difference, though, what they want. Here is the alternative: that we carry this vote, or be compelled to raise another million, and I don't know how many more, men, and fight no one knows how long. It is a question of three votes or new armies.
Page 56 - I am very anxious about this vote. It has got to be taken next week. The time is very short. It is going to be a great deal closer than I wish it was." "There are plenty of Democrats who will vote for it," I replied. "There is James E. English, of Connecticut; I think he is sure, isn't he?" "Oh, yes; he is sure on the merits of the question.
Page 54 - Nevada was organized and admitted into the Union to answer that purpose. I have sometimes heard people complain of Nevada as superfluous and petty, not big enough to be a State; but when I hear that complaint, I always hear Abraham Lincoln saying, " It is easier to admit Nevada than to raise another million of soldiers.
Page 38 - Mr. Lincoln has made a speech of perhaps forty or fifty lines. Everett's is the speech of a scholar, polished to the last possibility. It is elegant, and it is learned; but Lincoln's speech will be read by a thousand men where one reads Everett's, and will be remembered as long as anybody's speeches are remembered who speaks in the English language.
Page 41 - If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it ; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union ; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union. I shall do less whenever I shall believe that what I am doing hurts the cause, and I shall do more...
Page 59 - I understand, of course," said he, " that you are not saying this on your own authority? " " Oh, no," said I; " I am saying it on the authority of the President.
Page 69 - He says arrest him, but that I should refer the question to you." "Well," said he, slowly, wiping his hands, "no ; I rather think not. When you have got an elephant by the hind leg and he is trying to run away, it's best to let him run.

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