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LETTER LXVI.-Excursion to the top of Vesuvius-Descrip-

tion of the Crater-Herculaneuin.

LETTER LXVII.-Excursion to Pompeii-Description of the

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LETTER LXXI.-Sketch of Rome resumed-Description of
St. Peter's Church.

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LETTER LXXIV.-Rome continued-Pope's Cathedral-Pub-
lic Festival-Baptistry-Scala Santa-Church of Santa Maria
Maggiore-St. Mary of the Angels-Monte Testaccio-Tomb of
Caius Cestius-Protestant Cemetery-Excursion to St. Paul's of
į the Three Fountains.

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LETTERS FROM EUROPE.

LETTER XLV.

ROUTE TO TOULON-SKETCH OF THE TOWN AND HARBOUR NAVY-YARD ARSENAL.

March, 1826-At six o'clock on the morning of the 13th, we took seats in the Diligence at Marseilles for Toulon, a distance of about forty miles, in a south-easterly direction. Our own party consisted of five Americans, who had the same objects in view as ourselves. Among the other passengers

was a German Countess, whom we had met in a circle of agreeable ladies and gentlemen at the table d'hote of the Hotel Beauveau. She was going to Toulon, there to embark on board of a French ship of war, which was to land her at Civita Vecchia, on her way to Rome-an odd expidition for a lady to undertake alone. Her conversation respecting the country, whither we were hastening and in which she had long resided, was highly instructive.

The tract of country between Marseilles and Toulon is extremely picturesque. For the whole distance an excellent road winds among calcareous hills, the white, craggy tops of which appear at a distance as if snow-clad. Their steep sides are covered with vineyards and olives, hanging upon terraces, and rising stage above stage; while between the ranges on either hand, fertile and sunny vales of moderate breadth, and cultivated with the utmost neatness, open successively to relieve the eye of the traveller. Villages, hamlets, and chateaux, sometimes occupying the bosom of the valleys and at others seated far up the acclivities of the mountains, are scattered along the way and contribute much to the romantic character of the scenery.

Beyond the town of Beausset, and about midway between

VOL. II.

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