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GENERAL BUTLE

IN

NEW ORLEAN

BY

JAMES PARTON.

NEW YORK :
MASON BROTHERS, No 7 MERCER

FOR SALE BY
AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY

BOSTON: MASOY & IIAMLIN

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s," says the London Atheneum,a writer of whom the people of the United

to be proud”
or has written more successfully in the English Language than Mr Parton Tbe
for of his style, and the power of retaining the interest of his readers through the
sre universally iecognized. Each of his works has attracted much attention and
ensive sale, on its first appearance, and they have taken their place in the front rank
.ographies
1 Butler in New Orleans. A History of the
sistration of the Department of the Gulf, in the year 1862, with an Account of the Cap-
of New Orleans, and a Sketch of the Previous Career of the General, Civil and Military.
teenth edition. Crown octavo, with Portrait on Steel and Maps. 650 pages
Cloth, extra....

- $2 50
Half calf, extra .

4 00 le of Jackson. A Life of Andrew Jackson, President of the United States 3 vols crown octavo, 636, 672, and 734 pages, with Portraits on Steel Cloth, extra, price

.$7 50 In half calf, extia .

12 00
A life indeed, and before which the conventional and common place biographies of modern
times sink into stupidity and insignificance -N Y Journal of Commerce A fresher, livelier ac-
count was never written of any hero by any author -Boston Journal Possesses a degree of in-
terest which can scaicely be overstated —N Y World A work of impartial, accurate history
which, from the remarkable character of its hero, is more captivating and exciting than any novel
-Eastern Argus One of the most readable of books Every page is alive - Home Journal
Life of Aaron Burr. The Life and Times of Aaron

Burr, Lieut -Col in the Army of the Revolution, United States Senator, Third Vice-President
of the United States, etc Seventeenth Edition, revised and enlarged 2 vols crown octavo,
with Portraits on Steel
Cloth, extra, price

$4 00
In half calf, extia

7 00
Doubtless the most successful biography ever published in America -Harper's Weekly One
of the very best specimens of historical biography with which we are acquainted -Scottish Amer
Magazine Ought to be read by every American who would know the liistory of his country -
North American Pierrev In style, arrangement, and honesty of purpose, the finest work of its
class, without a shadow of reservation, to be found in the whole range of American literature
Mis Stephens' Bfagazine Å story more exciting than lomauce -N 1' Evangelist.
Life of Benjamin Franklin. It is believed to be the

most elaborate and interesting account yet given to the world, of this great and favorite
American 2 vols crown octavo, with Poitraits on Steel
Cloth, extra, price

...$5 00
In half calf, extia

7 00 Before Mr Paiton commenced the preparation of his “General Butler in New Orleans," he had already spent more than two years upon this Life of Franklin, having brought it near completion Humorous Poetry of

of the

the English Language, from. Chaucer to Saxe: including the most celebrated Comic Poems of the Anti-Jacobin, Rejectec Addresses, The Ingoldsby Legends, Blackwood's Magazine, Bentley's Miscellany, and Punch With more than Two Hundred Epigrans With notes, explanatory and biographical Seventi Crown octavo, 689 pages, with Portraits on Steel

n

$2 50
4 00

.

MASON & HAMLIN,

274 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON

GENERAL BUTLER IN NEW ORLEANS;

BEING A

HISTORY OF THE ADMINISTRATION

OF THE

DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF

IN THE YEAR 1862:

WITH

AN ACCOUNT OF THE CAPTURE OF NEW ORLEANS, AND A

SKETCH OF THE PREVIOUS CAREER OF THE

GENERAL, CIVIL AND MILITARY.

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NEW YORK : MASON BROTHERS, No. 7 MERCER STREET.

FOR SALE BY AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY, 119 NASSAU STREET. BOSTON: MASON & IIAMLIN. PHILADELPHIA: J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.

CHICAGO: S, C. GRIGGS & CO.

1864.

US 55 95.82

66 WHATEVER THEY CALL HIM, WHAT CARE I !
ARISTOCRAT, DEMOCRAT, AUTOCRAT, ONE
WHO CAN RULE AND DARE NOT LIE."- Maud.

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

S'MUM
THE WEQUEST OF
EVERT IARSEN WENDELL

1918

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1863, by

MASON BROTHERS,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern

District of New York.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1864, by

MASON BROTHERS,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern

District of New York.

In this edition some of the longer documents have been omitted or abridged, but the general course of the narrative remains unchanged, and nothing has been omitted which is necessary for the understanding of the various subjects treated in the work.

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PRE FACE.

It can not be necessary to apologize for an attempt to relate the history of the most remarkable episode of the war, respecting which opinions so violently contradictory are expressed, both at home and abroad. The vindication of the country itself seems to require that a policy should, at least, be understood, which the country has accepted as just, wise, and humane, and which the enemies of the country, foreign and domestic, denounce as arbitrary, savage, and brutal.

It is, however, of the first necessity to state how this book came to be written, and from what sources its contents have been derived.

Iu common with the other devotees of the Union and the Flag, I had watched the proceedings of GENERAL BUTLER in Louisiana with interest and approval; and shared also the indignation with which they regarded the perverse misinterpretation put upon his measures by the faction which has involved the Southern States in ruin, and by their “neutral” allies abroad.

Upon the return of General Butler to the North, I wrote to him, saying that I should like to write an account of his administration of the Department of the Gulf, as well as a slighter sketch of the previous military career of a man who, wherever he had been employed, has shown an ability equal to the occasion; but that this could not be done, and ought not to be attempted, without his consent and co-operation.

To this, the general thus replied :

"I am too much flattered by your request, and will endeavor to give you every assistance in the direction you mention. My letter and order books shall be at your disposal, as well as the official and unofficial correspondence directed to me. If I can, by personal conversation, eluci. date many matters wherein otherwise history might be a perversion of the truth, I will be at

your service.

“One thing I beg shall be understoood between us, however (as I have no doubt it would have been without this paragraph), that while I will furnish you with every possible facility to learn everything done by me in New Orleans and elsewhere, it will be upon the express condition that you shall report it in precisely the manner you may choose, without the slightest sense of obligation 'aught to extenuate' because of the source from which you derive the material of your work; and farther, that no sense of delicacy of position, in relation to myself, shall interfere with the closest investigation of every act alleged to have been done or permitted by mo. I will only ask that upon all matters I may have the privilege of presenting to your mind the documentary and other evidences of the fact.”

I had not the pleasure of General Butler's personal acquaintance, but our correspondence ended with my going to Lowell, where I lived for a considerable time in the general's own bouse, and received from him, from his staff, and from Mrs. Butler, every kind of aid they could render for the work proposed. We talked ten hours a day, and lived immersed in the multitudinous papers and letters relating to the events which have excited so much controversy. The general placed at my disposal the whole of those papers and letters, besides giving the most valuable verbal elucidations, and relating many anecdotes previously unrecorded.

Respecting the manner in which the material should be used, he did not then, and has not since, made a single suggestion of any kind. He left me perfectly froe in every respect. Nor has he seen a line of the manuscript, nor asked a quostion about it.

Therefore, while the whole value and the greater part of the interest of this volume are due to the aid afforded by General Butler, he is not to be held responsible for anything in it except his own writings. If I have misunderstood or misinterpreted any event or person, or used the papers injudiciously, at my door let all the blame be laid, for it is wholly my fault.

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