The Mikado: Institution and Person

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Princeton University Press, 1915 - Japan - 346 pages
 

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Page 22 - Our beloved subjects, the very same that have been favored with the benevolent care and affectionate vigilance of Our Ancestors; and hoping to maintain the prosperity of the State, in concert with Our People and with their support, We hereby promulgate, in pursuance of Our Imperial Rescript, of the...
Page 22 - Having, by virtue of the glories of Our Ancestors, ascended the Throne of a lineal succession unbroken for ages eternal; desiring to promote the welfare of, and to give development to the moral and intellectual faculties of Our beloved subjects, the very same that have been favoured with the benevolent care and affectionate vigilance of Our Ancestors; and hoping to maintain the prosperity of the State, in concert with Our people and with their support, We hereby promulgate...
Page 21 - Our other Imperial Ancestors. That we have been so fortunate in Our reign, in keeping with the tendency of the times, as to accomplish this work, We owe to the glorious Spirits of the Imperial Founder of Our House and of Our other Imperial Ancestors.
Page 184 - Englishmen in Tokyo were attacked by three two sworded men and wounded very severely. With Verbeck, I had the pleasure of helping to nurse them back to health. With the utmost promptness, the three assailants were caught and their confessions extorted from them before their punishment was decreed. What surprised and pleased the British Minister was the production of a new criminal code, two out of five volumes being then ready. According to its provisions two of the guilty ruffians were strangled...
Page 123 - The march of events has brought about a revolution, and the old system can no longer be obstinately persevered in. You should restore the governing power into the hands of the sovereign and so lay a foundation on which Japan may take its stand as the equal of all other countries. This is the most imperative duty of the present moment, and is the heartfelt prayer of Yodo. Your Highness is wise enough to take this advice into consideration...
Page 51 - A thousand years of happy life be thine! Live on, my lord, till what are pebbles now, By age united, to great rocks shall grow, Whose venerable sides the moss doth line!
Page 244 - Nodzu, and backed by ships and men, to deal with the crisis. This they did quickly. Steam and electricity make history short. The castle at Saga had been stormed, but the Imperial mind was speedily relieved by a telegram from Okubo, announcing surrender on the one hand and victory on the other. Eto fled, but was soon discovered. He had feathered the shafts for his own destruction. When Minister of Justice in Tokyo he had introduced the custom of making the faces of criminals known by photography....
Page 95 - The water placed in goblet, bowl or cup Changes its form to its receptacle ; And so our plastic souls take various shapes And characters of good or ill, to fit The good or evil in the friends we choose. Therefore 'be ever careful in your choice of friends, And let your special love be given to those Whose strength of character may prove the whip That drives you ever to fair Wisdom's goal.
Page 136 - Reverence for the Sovereign!" and "Exclusion of Barbariansl", yet the leaders of the movement knew well that the last was neither practicable nor desirable; and on the fourteenth day of the third month of the first year of Meiji (April 6, 1868), the Emperor summoned the imperial princes and high officials of his court, and in the Shishinden, or throne-room, of the old palace in Kyoto swore the memorable oath known as "The Imperial Oath of Five Articles," setting forth the policy which was to be followed...
Page 296 - Tis surely not Our fault. We've sought to be sincere in deed and word; We have exhausted every means to press A clear and truthful case, but all in vain. Now may the God that sees...

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