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The blockade at Wilmington.-How ineffective.-FIRST EXPEDITION AGAINST FORT

FISHER. Butler's powder-ship.-The two days' bombardment.-Landing of

Butler's troops.-Butler decides not to attack.-His sudden departure.-He is

removed from command.-SECOND EXPEDITION AGAINST FORT FISHER.-FALL OF

WILMINGTON.-Landing of Terry's command.-Movements of General Hoke.-The

assault on the fort.-A feu d'enfer.-Desperate fighting.-The Confederates

overpowered. Surrender of Fort Fisher.-Evacuation of Fort Anderson.-Yankee

occupation of Wilmington.-How a part of General Sherman's campaign in the

Carolinas.-SHERMAN'S SIXTY DAYS IN THE CAROLINAS.-Direction of his march.—

Crossing the Savannah River.-Mismanagement of the Confederate troops.-Sher-

man at Branchville.-THE FALL OF CHARLESTON.-Hardee joins Beauregard.—

Conflagration in Charleston.-Explosion at the railroad depot.-A scarred city.-

Charleston as seen through Yankee eyes.-CAPTURE AND BURNING of Columbia.—

Wild and savage scenes of pillage.-The city on fire.-Four thousand citizens

homeless. Sherman's march northward.-His organization of "bummers."—

The column of smoke.-The Yankees at Winnsboro'.-More of the enemy's atro-

cities. Sherman's feint upon Charlotte.-His occupation of Fayetteville.-Hamp-

ton attacks Kilpatrick.-Sherman's appointment of a rendezvous with Schofield.

-Hardee's fight near Averysboro'.-What he did with half a corps of Confeder-

ates.-THE BATTLE OF BENTONVILLE.-Success of the Confederates.-No decisive

results. Sherman's move towards Goldsboro'.-Schofield's movement.-Sher-

man's success.-His congratulatory order.-A military conference at City Point,

Virginia....

The last address and appeal of the Confederate Congress.--The war in a geographical

point of view.-THE CONFEDERATE CONGRESS AND PRESIDENT DAVIS.-THE EXECU-

TIVE DEPARTMENTS.-A sharp recrimination.-- A committee of the Senate reply to

President Davis.-Maladministration in the War Department.-Two-thirds of the

Confederate Army absentees.-Lee loses nearly half his army by desertions.--The

other half threatened with starvation.-Ample supply of food in the country.--

The fault in the Commissary Department.--Commissary Northrop a "pepper-doc-

tor" as the favorite of Davis.-Analysis of President Davis' character for firmness.

-How Northrop starved Richmond.-HISTORY OF THE CONFEDERATE COMMISSA-

RIAT.-Secret testimony in Congress.-President Davis' refusal to trade cotton for

meat.-Persistent delusion about "king cotton."-Venality of the enemy.-Davis

takes no advantage of it.--Record of the rations in Lee's army.-Startling statis-

tics.-Attempts to get meat from Europe.-General Lee's army without meat.--

His telegram to President Davis.-The necessities of the Commissary Department

summed up in secret session of Congress.--But little done to meet them.--How the

cause of the Confederacy would have failed without a catastrophe of arms.-The

military narrative resumed.-MILITARY EVENTS IN VIRGINIA IN THE WINTER OF

1864-5.-SHERIDAN'S RAID.-Thirteen counties traversed.--Amount of destruction

accomplished by the enemy.--THE RICHMOND LINES.-HATCHER'S RUN.-Extension

of Grant's line.-BATTLE OF HARES HILL.-Gallantry of Gordon's command.-Vigor

and brilliancy of the fighting of the Confederates.--No decisive results....... 178

What the Confederates anticipated on the fall of Richmond.-Two opinions.-Pro-

phetic words of the Richmond Examiner.-Disintegration of Lee's army.-The

line of his retreat.-Grant's pursuit.-Sheridan captures prisoners, guns, and wag-

ons. Sheridan's dispatch.-Change in the movements of both armies.-The situa-

tion at Appomattox Court-house.-How Lee was surrounded.-SURRENDER OF the

ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA.—A frightful demoralization of the army. More than

two-thirds of the men deserted.--Pickett's division.-Reasons to suppose that Gen-

eral Lee had predetermined a surrender on moving from Richmond and Peters-

burg. Straggling of his soldiers.-Official correspondence concerning the surren-

der.-Interview between General Lee and General Grant at McLean's house.-How

General Lee looked.--Grant's generous conduct.-Scenes between the lines of the

two armies.--An informal conference of officers.-How the news of surrender was

received in the Yankee army.-How received at Washington.--Secretary Stanton's

dispatch.-President Lincoln's speech." Dixie" in Washington.-General Lee's

farewell address to his army.-His return to Richmond.--Effect of Lee's surrender.

--General Johnston's department.--MOVEMENTS IN THE SOUTHWEST.--FALL OF Mo-

BILE. Wilson's cavalry expedition through Alabama and Georgia.-SURRENDER

OF JOHNSTON'S ARMY.--Sherman's "basis of negotiations" repudiated at Wash-

ington. The policy of the Northern Government unmasked.-Sherman's reply.-

SURRENDER OF TAYLOR'S ARMY.-SURRENDER OF KIRBY'S SMITH'S ARMY.-" War

meetings" in Texas.-Want of public resolution.-The last act of the war.-A sud-

den peace, and what it implied..
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