Page images
PDF
EPUB

New Orleans, May 28, 1862.

No. 35.

In view of the arrival of stores from New York, and the speedy opening of this port, reducing the price of provisions, and for the speedy relief of the poor, the Chief Commissary of Subsistence will sell to families for consumption, in small quantities, until further orders, flour ind salt meats, viz: pork, beef, ham and bacon, from the stores of the Army, at 72 cents per pound for flour, and 10 cents for meats.

Place of sale designated hereafter. City Bank Notes, Gold, Silver or Treasury Notes, to be taken in payment.

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER :

R. S. DAVIS,

Captain and Acting Assistant Aljutant General.

No. 36.

New Orleans, May 31, 1862.

Abraham McLane, Daniel Doyle, Edward C. Smith, Patrick Kane, George L. Williams and William Stanley, all enlisted men in the forces of the supposed Confederate States, captured at the surrender of Forts St. Philip and Jackson, bave violated their parole of honor under which they, prisoners of war, were permitted to return to their homes, instead of being confined in prison, as have the unfortunates of the United States soldiers who, falling into the hands of rebel chiefs, have languished for months in the closest durance.

Warned by their officers that they must not to do this thing, they deliberately organized themselves in military array, chose themselves and comrades officers, relying, as they averred, upon promises of prominent citizens of New Orleans for a supply of arms and equipments. They named themselves the Monroe Life Guard, in honor of the late Mayor of New Orleans.

They conspired together, and arranged the manner in which they might force the pickets of the United States, and thus join the enemy at Corinth.

Tried before an impartial Military Commission-fully heard in their defensethese facts appeared beyond doubt or contradiction, and they were convicted.

There is no known pledge more sacred—there is no military offense whose punishment is better defined or more deserved. To their crime but one punishment has ever been assigned by any nation--DEATH.

This sentence has been approved by the Commanding General. To the end that all others may take warning--that solemn obligations may be preserved—that War may not lose all honorable ties--that clemency may not be abused, ard that justice may be done :

It is ordered : that Abraham McLane, Daniel Doyle, Edward t?. Smith, Patrick Kane, George L. Williams and William Stanley be shot to death, under the direction of the Provost Marshal, immediately after reveille, on Wednesday, the fourth day of June next; and, for so doing, this shall be the Provost Marshal's sufficient

warrant.

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER :

R. S. DAVIS,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant Generai.

New Orleans, June 2, 1862.

No. 37.

All officers and others collecting money for and in behalf of the United States will make a full and explicit return of such moneys up to the 1st of June current, to this office ; also, of their expenditures and doings in that behalf.

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER :

R. S. DAVIS,
Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant General.

« PreviousContinue »