From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 21 - ... of only 10 cents per ton on the average freight (which cannot fail to satisfy the public) will, without any increase in the tonnage, equal $165,000, or, in other words, an additional profit of 4 per cent upon the amount of common stock. That the demand for Pennsylvania's great staple will continue to increase, none can doubt. It has become, by its price, by its ease of transportation, by its economy in use, forever connected with the steamengine, and is thus inseparable from the Commerce and...
Page 24 - ... per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually on the first days of April and October in each year.
Page 58 - Without troubling you with farther details but leaving those who may desire it, to follow me in the calculations from the data given, I respectfully submit the following as the cost of transporting coal on roads of various grades, exclusive of drawbacks, or of interest on capital : — Level Road»— Average net load, 487-2 Iota. Capacity, 4,000,000 tons. No. of trains, 9,149. Cost per ton per mile, -Л5 cent«.
Page 62 - But the level roads can do double the business of the others, and that with the same amount of motive power, so that, whilst the graded road is carrying its 2,000,000 of tons for net cost, the level road can, at the same prices, realize on its 4,000,000 of tons a profit of $1,200,000, or the interest on $20,000,000.
Page 62 - ... the country is such as to forever debar the possibility of a work being constructed equal to it in capacity, either as to the extent or cheapness ol coal transportation. We occasionally see it gravely asserted that grades are of small importance on railroads, but we have been reviewing an extended system, in which the capacity varies from 500,000 to 4,000,000 of tons per annum, and this variation is produced by grades. It is not the object of this report to draw unfavorable comparisons except...
Page 47 - ... commonly used in Connecticut. " The Iron Quaker " machine, plate VII, manufactured by the Wellington Machine Co. of Wellington, Ohio, represents a horsepower machine. It weighs 4,500 pounds, and makes 15,000 to 20,000 brick per day, with two horses and from five to seven men. It is six feet high, five and a half feet long, and three and a half feet wide. Five molds of six bricks each are turned out to every two turns of the horses. This machine is adapted for small yards. The firm of AM and WH...
Page 24 - December 1, 1851, it is stated that "satisfactory results have been obtained from the application of an improved method of burning anthracite coal in locomotives, invented by James Millholland, Master Machinist, by which the quantity of coal consumed and the intensity of the fire are alike diminished. "The successful experience of this improvement for several months, in five engines, has established its value, and proved that anthracite coal is, at present prices of wood, the most economical fuel...
Page 40 - Amount of Coal received from various Lateral Railroads in Coal Region. Mount Carbon and Port Carbon Railroad, at Port Carbon, from Valley and Mill Creek Railroads...
Page 3 - Report of the President and Managers of the Philadelphia and Reading Rail Road Company to the Stockholders, January 13, 1845 (Philadelphia, 1845), 8; and the excellent survey of the road's finances in David A.
Page 15 - Minnchciha, have been completed, and in use for some months. In economy of fuel and repairs, and general efficiency, these locomotives have proved superior to any yet used, and are believed to furnish an excellent model for others which may be hereafter required for similar service". This proved to be a fact; for the Reading designs of the late fifties continued to be built, with comparatively little variation, until the advent of the Wootten boiler in 1877. Millholland 's locomotives had boilers...

Bibliographic information