The Life of Sir Joseph Napier, Bart., Ex-Lord Chancellor of Ireland: From His Private Correspondence

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Longmans, Green, 1887 - Ireland - 435 pages
 

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Page 383 - The storm has gone over me ; and I lie like one of those old oaks which the late hurricane has scattered about me. I am stripped of all my honours, I am torn up by the roots, and lie prostrate on the earth ! There, and prostrate there, I most unfeignedly recognize the Divine justice, and in some degree submit to it.
Page 255 - God ; and in Public Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments I will use the Form in ' the said Book prescribed, and none other, except so far as shall be ordered by lawful
Page 282 - Behold, we know not anything; I can but trust that good shall fall At last — far off — at last, to all, And every winter change to spring.
Page 382 - tis better to be lowly born, And range with humble livers in content, Than to be perk'd up in a glistering grief, And wear a golden sorrow.
Page 231 - What needs my Shakespeare for his honoured bones The labour of an age in piled stones ? Or that his hallowed reliques should be hid Under a star-ypointing pyramid ? Dear son of memory, great heir of fame, What needst thou such weak witness of thy name ? Thou in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a livelong monument.
Page 114 - ... that action and counteraction which, in the natural and in the political world, from the reciprocal struggle of discordant powers draws out the harmony of the universe.
Page 269 - I may assume that the awful Author of our being is the Author of our place in the order of existence, — and that, having disposed and marshalled us by a divine tactic, not according to our will, but according to His, He has in and by that disposition virtually subjected us to act the part which belongs to the place assigned us.
Page 187 - ... a man. The matter changeth, the custom, the contracts, the commerce, the dispositions, educations, and tempers of men and societies, change in a long tract of time, and so must their laws in some measure be changed, or they will not be useful for their state and condition; and besides all this, time is the wisest thing under heaven.
Page 254 - I AB do solemnly make the following Declaration: "I assent to the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion, and to the book of Common Prayer and of the ordering of Bishops, Priests, and Deacons.
Page 283 - The primal duties shine aloft — like stars ; The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, Are scattered at the feet of Man — like flowers.

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