A Discourse on the Character and Death of John Brown: Delivered in Martinsburgh, N. Y., Dec. 12, 1859

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Steam Printing House of Carter, Hussey and Curl, 1872 - Abolitionists - 24 pages
 

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Page 19 - I admire the truthfulness and candor of the greater portion of the witnesses who have testified in this case), — had I so interfered in behalf of the rich, the powerful, the intelligent, the so-called great, or in behalf of any of their friends, either father, mother, brother, sister, wife, or children, or any of that class, and suffered and sacrificed what I have in this interference, it would have been all right, and every man in this court would have deemed it an act worthy of reward rather...
Page 23 - He is coming ! he is coming ! Like a bridegroom from his room, Came the hero from his prison To the scaffold and the doom. There was glory on his forehead, There was lustre in his eye, And he never walked to battle More proudly than to die...
Page 9 - I would not have a slave to till my ground, To carry me, to fan me while I sleep, And tremble when I wake, for all the wealth That sinews bought and sold have ever earned.
Page 23 - But when he came, though pale and wan, He looked so great and high, So noble was his manly front, So calm his steadfast eye ; — The rabble rout forbore to shout, And each man held his breath, For well they knew the hero's soul Was face to face with death.
Page 19 - I endeavored to act up to that instruction. I say I am yet too young to understand that GOD is any respecter of persons. I believe that to have interfered as I have done, as I have always freely admitted I have done, in behalf of His despised poor, is no wrong, but right.
Page 19 - I believe that to have interfered as I have done, as I have always freely admitted I have done, in behalf of His despised poor, was not wrong, but right. Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice, and mingle my blood further with the blood of my children, and with the blood of millions in this slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments — I submit: so let it be done.
Page 24 - But whether on the scaffold high, Or in the battle's van, The fittest place where man can die Is where he dies for man ! THE CHARCOAL MAN.— JT TROWRRIDG*.
Page 10 - Either the cotton and rice fields of South Carolina and the sugar plantations of Louisiana will ultimately be tilled by free labor, and Charleston and New Orleans become marts...
Page 23 - He mounted up the scaffold, And he turned him to the crowd ; But they dared not trust the people, So he might not speak aloud. But he looked upon the heavens, And they were clear and blue...
Page 10 - It is an irrepressible conflict between opposing and enduring forces, and it means that the United States must and will, sooner or later, become either entirely a slave-holding nation or entirely a free-labor nation.

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