Reunion, Volume 31

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With reports of meetings of the societies of the Army of the Cumberland; the Army of the Tennessee; the Army of the Ohio; and the Army of Georgia.
 

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Page 129 - Sherman, and the gallant officers and soldiers of his command before Atlanta, for the distinguished ability, courage, and perseverance displayed in the campaign in Georgia, which, under divine favor, has resulted in the capture of Atlanta.
Page 129 - When you were about leaving Atlanta for the Atlantic coast, I was anxious, if not fearful ; but feeling that you were the better judge; and remembering that "nothing risked, nothing gained," I did not interfere. Now, the undertaking being a success, the honor is all yours ; for I believe none of us went further than to acquiesce.
Page 130 - Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate military advantages; but in showing to the world that your army could be divided, putting the stronger part to an important new service, and yet leaving enough to vanquish the old opposing force of the whole, — Hood's army, — it brings those who sat in darkness to see a great light. But what next? I suppose it will be safe if I leave General Grant and yourself to decide. Please make my grateful acknowledgments to your whole army — officers and...
Page 129 - Thomas into account, as it should be taken, it is indeed a great success. Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate military advantages, but in showing to the world that your army could be divided, putting the stronger part to an important new service and yet leaving enough to vanquish the old opposing force of the whole, Hood's army, it brings those who sat in darkness to see a great light.
Page 135 - As the editor of the Times has (it may be) logically and fairly drawn from this singular document the conclusion that I am, insubordinate, I can only deny the intention. I have never in my life questioned or disobeyed an order, though many and many a time have I risked my life, my health, and reputation in obeying orders, or even hints, to execute plans and purposes not to my liking.
Page 129 - My DEAR GENERAL SHERMAN : Many, many thanks for your Christmas gift, the capture of Savannah. When you were about leaving Atlanta for the Atlantic coast I was anxious, if not fearful ; but feeling that you were the better judge, and remembering that 'nothing risked, nothing gained,
Page 130 - Lee, but by that time he had learned to fear Grant, and he dreaded to run the risk of taking any considerable portion of his own army to send to Johnston. Thus he let slip the only possible chance of saving the Confederate cause. On this point General SHERMAN has said, speaking of General Lee: His sphere of action was, however, local. He never rose to the grand problem which involved a continent and future generations. His Virginia was to him the world. Though familiar with the geography of the interior...
Page 125 - The murderer takes a single life ; the corruptionist in public life, whether he be bribe giver or bribe taker, strikes at the heart of the commonwealth. In every public service, as in every army, there will be wrongdoers, there will occur misdeeds. This can not be avoided; but vigilant watch must be kept, and as soon as discovered the wrongdoing must be stopped and the wrongdoers punished.
Page 129 - The marches, battles, sieges, and other military operations that have signalized the campaign must render it famous in the annals of war, and have entitled those who have participated therein to the applause and thanks of the Nation.
Page 91 - Virginia communicating a series of resolutions passed at a meeting of the Governors of the States of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi, held in Augusta, Ga.

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