The Early Life, Correspondence and Writings of the Rt. Hon. Edmund Burke, LL. D.: With a Transcript of the Minute Book of the Debating "Club" Founded by Him in the Trinity College, Dublin

Front Cover
The University Press, 1923 - Dublin (Ireland) - 418 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 226 - O thou, that, with surpassing glory crown'd, Look'st from thy sole dominion like the god Of this new world ; at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminish'd heads ; to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 sun ! to tell thee how I hate thy beams, That bring to my remembrance from what state 1 fell, how glorious once above thy sphere...
Page 264 - My sentence is for open war : of wiles, More unexpert, I boast not : them let those Contrive who need, or when they need, not now...
Page 101 - Methought I heard a voice cry " Sleep no more ! Macbeth does murder sleep" — the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast, — Lady M.
Page 101 - Sleep no more ! Macbeth doth murder sleep, the innocent sleep; Sleep, that knits up the ravell'd sleave ' of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast ; — Lady M. What do you mean ? Macb. Still it cried, Sleep no more ! to all the house : Glamis hath murdered sleep; and therefore Cawdor Shall sleep no more ; Macbeth shall sleep no more .
Page 264 - Main reason to persuade immediate war Did not dissuade me most, and seem to cast Ominous conjecture on the whole success...
Page 231 - It is now too apparent, that this great, this powerful, this formidable kingdom, is considered only as a province to a despicable Electorate; and that, in consequence of a scheme formed long ago, and invariably pursued, these troops are hired only to drain this unhappy nation of its money.
Page 107 - Against th' unwarlike Persian and the Mede, Whose hasty flight did, from a bloodless field, More spoils than honour to the victor yield. A race unconquer'd, by their clime made bold, The Caledonians, arm'd with want and cold, Have, by a fate indulgent to your fame, Been from all ages kept for you to tame. Whom the old Roman wall...
Page 401 - Merchant, being of sound mind, memory, and understanding, do make and publish this my last Will and Testament, in manner following: that is to say— I. I give and bequeath unto " The Contributors to the Pennsylvania Hospital...
Page 215 - It is reconciled in policy ; and politics ought to be adjusted, not to human reasonings, but to human nature ; of which the reason is but a part, and by no means the greatest part.
Page 14 - He had been educated (he said) as a protestant of the church of England by a dissenter who was an honour to his sect, though that sect was considered one of the purest. Under his eye he had read the Bible, morning, noon, and night, and had ever since been the happier and better man for such reading.

Bibliographic information