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THE LOST CAUSE;

A New Southern History of the War of the Confederates.

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A FULL AND AUTHENTIC ACCOUNT OF THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE LATE SOUTHERN
CONFEDERACY-THE CAMPAIGNS, BATTLES, INCIDENTS, AND ADVEN-
TURES OF THE MOST GIGANTIC STRUGGLE OF THE

WORLD'S HISTORY.

DRAWN FROM OFFICIAL SOURCES, AND APPROVED BY THE MOST DIS-

TINGUISHED CONFEDERATE LEADERS.

BY

EDWARD A. POLLARD, OF VIRGINIA,

NEW AND ENLARGED EDITION,

WITH NUMEROUS SPLENDID STEEL PORTRAITS.

SOLD ONLY BY SUBSCRIPTION.

New York :
E. B. TREAT & CO., PUBLISHERS.

BALTIMORE, MD.: J. 8. MORROW. ST. LOUIS, Mo.: I. 8. BRAINERD.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.: J. H. HUMMEL. LOUISVILLE, Ky.: F. I. DIBBLE.

CHICAGO, ILL.: O. W. LILLEY.

1868.

.I, 6146.9 9354.14

1886, hivi

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Fredacc lageshall

PUBLISHERS NOTICE.

We take pleasure in presenting the FIFTY-THIRD THOUSAND—a new and enlarged edition of the Lost Cause, with the assurance that it is the latest and most complete History of the War published. The entire work has been written since the close of the war, and is brought down to the release of President Davis (May, 1867). The value and importance of this work have also been greatly increased by the addition of a new and comprehensive map of the military operations during the war of 1861-5 (arranged expressly to accompany the present edition), giving all the important battle-fields (in colors), all the railroads, State and county lines, and making the most complete and reliable map of the kind published.

E. B. TREAT & Co.

NEW YORK, 1867.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in tho year 1867, by

E. B. TREAT & CO.,
In the Clerk's office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York.

INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW AND ENLARGED EDITION.

In presenting a second edition of “The Lost Cause,” occasioned by the extraordinary and increasing demand for the work, the author has much to acknowledge and remember gratefully of the consideration he has obtained, and yet something to say of some companies of unfriendly critics.

He can afford to wait the public judgment on a history which his publishers assure him has already obtained more than half a million of readers. He is quite content with the success of his work; he has no disposition to expedite interest in it by unnecessary controversy ; but there has reached him from friendly quarters a certain protest agains his work, which deserves to be noticed, and makes the occasion for an explanation which he has sincerely songht. It is that his book is particularly hostile to ex-President Davis, and manifests a general “prejndice” towards the civil rulers of the Confederacy. This notion, evidently honest with many who have been imposed upon by garbled extracts from “ The Lost Cause,” or downwright misrepresentations of tho reviewer, has really concerned and mortified the author. It is time that the public was disabused of this notion, which will best be done by a careful and candid reading of the book,—and that a proper line be drawn between just historical criticism and vile personal denunciation.

While the author has obtained from many parts of the world, and from the most enlightened portions of Europe, assurances that his history has done so much to clear and adorn the name of the South in the late war, and has been of signal advantage to the reputation of his country, it has pained him to see some peculiar criticisms in Southern journals, emanating invariably from a class that thinks it has not properly been distinguished in the record of events. But he wrote this history in allegiance to the truth, and in the interest of the people of

INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW AND ENLARGED EDITION.

the South, and not in behalf of any combination of mutual admirers. The consequence is, that a certain General does not think his figure quite large enough in the gallery of “The Lost Cause;" another complains that there is omitted from its pages some cross-roads battle in the trans-Mississippi, which he thinks “the most important battle of the war;” and a third declares that, with malice prepense against the distinguished officer who figured on the occasion, the author has taken no notice of the capture of some tug in the North Carolina swash!

The author admits that there are events of the war, which the actors thought very important, that he has not detailed; and he should consider himself utterly unworthy of the task of the historian, if he had attempted a record of the war by an enumeration of events, after the fashion of the modern almanac, having no regard to the proportion of incidents and the dramatic unity of the narrative.

But in the interest of truth, in the vindication and honour of the people of the South, in their service, wherein his pen has been enlisted, he does point with pride to the extraordinary favour with which the history he has written under the title of “The Lost Cause” has been received by the first authorities in the critical literature of this country and of Europe. He is proud to know that leading English journals have declared that his book has put to rest forever the ghastly stories of Andersonville, and relieved the South from the charge of such atrocities. He is proud to know that it has obtained the honour of a translation into the French language, and found a sale in all the countries of Europe, and that educated men have given it a prominent place in the historical literature of the age, and declare it the crowning vindication of the Southern cause.

If the author of "The Lost Cause” had done nothing more than answer to the attention and satisfaction of the world the charge of “rebel barbarities,” this alone should entitle him to the consideration and gratitude of the South. But he intends to make other claims on their regard; and his pen has not yet stopped, and is now busy on another theme of Southern glory, in which the mass of his countrymen will find a new illumination of the Confederate name, and an arrangement of the ornaments of their arms, not unlikely to obtain the envy of their enemies and the regard of the world.

EDWARD ALFRED POLLARD.

VIRGINIA, 1867.

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