Abridgment of Mental Philosophy: Including the Three Departments of the Intellect, Sensibilities, and Will. Designed as a Text-book for Academies and High Schools

Front Cover
Harper & bros., 1869 - Intellect - 564 pages
 

Contents

The connexion between the mental and physical change not ca pable of explanation
26
27
27
Of the primary and secondary qualities of matter
28
Of the secondary qualities of matter
29
CHAPTER III
30
Nature and importance of the senses as a source of know edge 19 Connexion of the brain with sensation and perception
31
Order in which the senses are to be considered 20 Of the sense and sensations of smell
32
Of perceptions of smell in distinction from sensations
33
Of the sense and the sensations of taste CHAPTER IV
34
THE SENSE OF HEARING 23 Organ of the sense of hearing
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Varieties of the sensation of sound
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Manner in which we learn the place of sounds
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Illustration of the subject from the blind
38
Measurements of magnitude by the
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Of objects seen in a mist
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Of the sun and moon when seen in the horizon
41
Of the estimation of distances by sight
42
Signs by means of which we estimate distance by sight
43
Estimation of distance when unaided by intermediate objects
44
CHAPTER VII
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The law of habit applicable to the mind as well as the body
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Of habit in relation to the smell
48
ib
54
56
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Sectior
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Of habit in relation to the taste
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Of habit in relation to the hearing
62
Application of habit to the touch
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Other striking instances of habits of touch
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Habits considered in relation to the sight
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Origin of the distinction of simple and complex
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Sensations may possess a relative as well as positive increase of power
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Of habits as modified by particular callings and arts
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Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine 68 Additional illustrations of Mr Stewarts doctrine 56 The law of habit considered in reference ...
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Origin of complex notions and their relation to simple
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CHAPTER VIII
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Of conceptions of objects of sight
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Illustrations of analysis as applied to the mind 75 Complex notions of external origin
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Of the influence of habit on our conceptions
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Influence of habit on conceptions of sight 63 Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description
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Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief
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Conceptions which are joined with perceptions
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CHAPTER X
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ib 84
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Conceptions as conrected with fictitious representations
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Abstraction implied in the analysis of complex ideas 78 Instances of particular abstract ideas
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Mental process in separating and abstracting them
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General abstract notions the same with genera and species
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Process in classification or the forming of genera and species
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Early classifications sometimes incorrect 83 Illustrations of our earliest classifications
97
Of the nature of general abstract ideas
98
The power of general abstraction in connexion with numbers
99
Of the speculations of philosophers and others
100
CHAPTER XI
101
Of different degrees of attention
102
Dependence of memory on attention
103
Of exercising attention in reading
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Alleged inability to command the attentior
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CHAPTER XII
107
Dreams are often caused by our sensations
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Explanation of the incoherency of dreams 1st cause 97 Second cause of the incoherency of dreams
110
Apparent reality of dreams 1st cause
111
Apparent reality of dreams 2d cause
112
Of our estimate of time in dreaming
113
Explanation of the preceding statements
114
PART II
117
CHAPTER I
119
Section Page
120
Declaration of Locke that the soul has knowdge in itself 107
122
109
124
110
126
Of the origin of the idea of power
132
Consciousnes a ground or law of belief
138
DEMONSTRATIVE REASONING
143
Of complex terms involving the relation of cause and effect
149
Contrast the second general or primary law
155
Bection
159
Remarks on the general nature of memory
166
Of that species of memory called intentional recollection
173
Directions or rules for the improvement of the memory
179
Application of the principles of this chapter to education
187
Illustration of the preceding statement
193
Of reasoning in connexion with language or expression
199
Section Pagi 185 Of the subjects of demonstrative reasoning
201
Use of definitions and axioms in demonstrative reasoning
202
The opposites of demonstrative reasonings absurd
203
Demonstrations do not admit of different degrees of belief
204
Of the use of liagrams in demonstrations
205
CHAPTER XI
206
Of the nature of moral certainty
207
Of reasoning from analogy
208
Of reasoning by induction
209
Of combined or accumulated arguments
210
CHAPTER XII
211
Care to be used in correctly stating the subject of discussion
212
Consider the kind of evidence applicable to the subject
213
Fallacia equivocationis or the use of equivocal terms and phrases
215
Of the sophism of estimating actions and character from the c
216
Of adherence to our opinions
217
Effects on the mind of debating for victory instead of truth
218
CHAPTER XIII
219
The imagination closely related to the reasoning power
220
Definition of the power of imagination
221
Process of the mind in the creations of the imagination
222
Further remarks on the same subject
223
Grounds of the preference of one conception to another
224
Illustration of the subject from Milton 22
225
Illustration of the statements of the preceding section
227
On the utility of the faculty of the imagination
228
Importance of the imagination in connexion with reasoning
229
CHAPTER XIV
231
Of excited conceptions and of apparitions in general
232
Of disordered or alienated sensations
245
Of disordered or alienated external perception
246
Disordered state or insanity of original suggestion
247
Unsoundness or insanity of consciousness
248
Insanity of the judgment or relative suggestion
249
Disordered or alienated association Lightheadedness
250
Illustrations of this mental disorder 235 Of partial insanity or alienation of the memory
251
Of the power of reasoning in the partially insane
253
Instance of the above form of insanity of reasoning
254
Partial mental alienation by means of the imagination
255
Insanity or alienation of the power of belief
256
DIVISION II
259
INTRODUCTION CLASSIFICATION OF THE SENSIBILITIES 240 Reference to the general division of the whole mind 244 245
261
Division of the sensibilities into natural or pathematic and moral
262
The moral and natural sensibilities have different objects
263
The moral sensibilities higher in rank than the natural 245 The moral sensibilities wanting in brutes
264
Classification of the natural sensibilities
265
Classification of the moral sensibilities
266
PART I
267
CHAPTER I
269
The place of emotions considered in reference to other mental acts
270
The character of emotions changes so as to comform to that of perceptions
271
Emotions characterized by rapidity and variet
272
EMOTIONS OF BEAUTY
273
Remarks on the beauty of forms The circle
279
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
286
Explanation of the beauty of motion from Kaimes
292
Emotions of cheerfulness joy and gladness
295
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of human
298
Of the prevalence of desire in this department of the mind
301
Of sounds as furnishing an occasion of sublime emotions
305
Of what is understood by
311
Of the na ura desire of esteem
328
Of the desire of esteem as a rule of conduct
329
Instances of instincts in the human mind
330
Of the moral character of the possessory principie
331
Of perversions of the possessory desire
332
Of the desire of power
333
Of the moral character of the desire of power 335 Propensity of selflove or the desire of happiness
335
CHAPTER IV
336
Reference to the opinions of philosophical writers
337
The principle of sociality original in the human mind
338
Evidence of the existence of this principle of sociality
339
Other illustrations of the existence of this principle Relation of the social principle to civil society
340
Practical results of he principle of imitation
342
Of the complex nature of the affections
343
Of resentment or anger
344
Illustrations of instinctive resentment
345
Uses and moral character of instinctive resentment
346
Of voluntary in distinction from instinctive resentment
347
Tendency of anger to excess and the natural checks to
348
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions
349
Modifications of resentment
350
Modifications of resentment
351
Modifications of resentment
352
Modifications of resentment
353
Nature of the passion of fear Peevishness Envy Jealousy Revenge
354
Of the nature of love or benevolence in general
355
Love in its various forms characterized by a twofold action
356
Of the parental affection
357
Illustrations of the strength of the parental affection
358
Of the filial affection
359
The filial affection original or implanted
360
Illustrations of the filial affection 362 Of the nature of the fraternal affection Pags 341 345 346
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404
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39 392
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Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine 371 Of patriotism or love of country 372 Of the affection of friendship 373 Of the affection of pity or s...
420
Further proof from language and literature
426
Disordered actior of the principle of selfpreservatio
428
Feelings of obligation differ from desires
432
Of the time when moral instruction ought to commence
444
CHAPTER I
451
Disordered and alienated action of the possessory principle
455
CHAPTER II
461
Of sudden and strong impulses of the mind
467
Disordered action of the passion of fear
473
Moral accountability in cases of natural moral derangement
479
It exists in reference to what we believe to be in our power
486
LAWS OF THE WILL IMPLIED IN THE PRESCIENCE OR FORESIGHT
493
Of sagacity in the estimate of individual character
502
Objection to the argument from consciousness
508
Evidence from mens views of crimes and punishments
514
Proof of power in the will from internal experience
520
81
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120
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Page 308 - AND I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud : and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire...
Page 305 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Page 103 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Page 120 - Secondly, the other fountain from which experience furnisheth the understanding with ideas is, —the perception of the operations of our own mind within us, as it is employed about the ideas it has got; —which operations, when the soul comes to reflect on and consider, do furnish the understanding with another set of ideas, which could not be had from things without.
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Page 242 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
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