Genesis and Birth of the Federal Constitution: Addresses and Papers in the Marshall-Wythe School of Government and Citizenship of the College of William and Mary

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Julian Alvin Carroll Chandler
Macmillan, 1924 - Constitutional history - 397 pages
 

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Page 216 - It is essential to the preservation of the rights of every individual, his life, liberty, property, and character, that there be an impartial interpretation of the laws, and administration of justice. It is the right of every citizen to be tried by judges as free, impartial, and independent as the lot of humanity will admit.
Page 152 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity, namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property...
Page 30 - That the said report with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same be transmitted to the several legislatures in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates chosen in each state by the people thereof in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Page 168 - State; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty ; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
Page 268 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the union...
Page 302 - Monday in May next a Convention of delegates who shall have been appointed by the several states be held at Philadelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation...
Page 152 - That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the community, but in consideration of publicservices; which, not being descendible, neither ought the offices of magistrate, legislator, or judge to be hereditary.
Page 316 - RESOLVED. That the preceding CONSTITUTION be laid before the UNITED STATES in Congress assembled, and that it is the opinion of this Convention, that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention of Delegates, chosen in each State, by the people thereof; under the recommendation of its legislature, for their assent and ratification...
Page 314 - The friends of our country have long seen and desired that the power of making war, peace, and treaties, that of levying money and regulating commerce, and the correspondent executive and judicial authorities, should be fully and effectually vested in the General Government of the Union...
Page 254 - With hearts fortified with these animating reflections, we most solemnly, before God and the world, declare, that, exerting the utmost energy of those powers, which our beneficent Creator hath graciously bestowed upon us, the arms we have been compelled by our enemies to assume, we will, in defiance of every hazard, with unabating firmness and perseverence, employ for the preservation of our liberties ; being with one mind resolved to die freemen rather than to live slaves.

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