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Mr. F. Never mind; I know-between ourselvessee the whole man as plain as if he stood before me.

(LORD AVONDALE has placed himself close to

FERMENT'S chair.) Tyke. Why, for that matter, so do I. Mr. F. I'll soon find the right place to tickle him.

[Turns round, sees LORD AVONDALE at his elbow,

who eyes him with severityFERMENT attempts to speak, but cannot-LORD AVONDALE advances

-FERMENT escapes R. Ld. A. Worm into my secrets !-What does he mean? Who is he?

Tyke. (R.) He calls himself Ferment.
Ld. A. I shall remember him.

Tyke. He gave me this box to speak a good word for him like-he seems but a silly bad sort of chap, I think.

Ld. A. At present he is not worth a thought, for I have received information that alarms-distracts me. Come near—that boy (what a question for a parent !) does he survive ?

Tyke. I don't know.
Ld. A. Not know?
Tyke. No.
Ld. A. Where did you leave him ?

Tyke. Where did I leave him? Why-come, come, talk of something else. (Seems disturbed.)

Ld. A. Impossible !-Have you to human being ever told from whom you received that child ?

Tyle. No.
Ld. A. Then my secret's safe?
Tyke. I've said so.

Ld. A. Why that frown? What! not even to your father?

Tyke. Who? (Starts.)
Ld. A. What agitates you? You had a father.
Tyke. Had a father! Be quiet, be quiet.

!

(Walks about greatly agitated.) Ld. A. By the name of Him who indignantly looks down on us, tell me

a

Tyke. (Striking his forehead.) Say no more about that, and you shall hear all. Yes, I had a father, and when he heard of my disgrace, the old man walked, wi' heavy heart, I warrant, all the way tid' gaol to see me; and he prayed up to heaven for me (Pointing, but not daring to look up), just the same as if I had still been the pride of his heart.

(Speaks with difficulty, and sighs heavily.) Ld. A. Proceed. Tyke. Presently. Ld. A. Did you entrust the child to his care? Tyke. I did. Ld. A. Do not pause-you rack me.

Tyke. Rack you !-well, you shall hear the end on't. -I meant to tell father all about the child; but, when parting came, old man could not speak, and I could not speak—well, they put me on board a ship, and I saw father kneeling on the shore with the child in his

arns

Ld. A. Go on.

Tyke. 'Tis soon said (Collecting his fortitude). When the signal-gun for sailing was fired, I saw my old father drop down dead—and somebody took up child and carried it away. I felt a kind of dizziness; my eyes flashed fire, the blood gushed out of my mouth -I saw no more. (Sinks exhausted into chair, L.)

Ld. A. Horrible ! - What! record a father's death without a tear?

Tyke. Tear! Do you think a villain who has a father's death to answer for can cry? No, no; I feel a pack of dogs worrying my heart, and my eyes on fire—but I can't cry. (Ă vacant stare of horror.)

Ld. A. And is this desolation my work ?-0, repent! repent!

Tyke. (Starting up.) For what? is not father dead ? an't I a thief ?-cursed — hated-hunted ?

-Why should I be afraid of the Devil ? Don't I feel him here? My mouth's parched-

Ld. A. Within is wine,

Tyke. Brandy! brandy! Ld. A. Compose yourself-follow me—(Crosses L.) -you want sleep. Tyke. Sleep! ha! ha! under the sod I may.

[Points down, and groans heavily. Exit, follow

ing LORD AVONDALE, L.

a purse.—TYKE

Inside of Cottage.Table, and a candle burning on it.

Old Man seated R., looking on sitting, L. 0. Man. Pray, sir, who is that generous youth?

Tyke. Why, he's a kind of a foreman like to Lord Avondale, my friend.

0. Man. Are you the friend of that worthy nobleman ?

Tyke. Yes; between ourselves“I have him under my thumb; but I say that out of confidence—you understand. That's a smartish purse you've got there; but, I tell you what, I don't think it's very safe, just

now.

0. Man. Indeed, sir! You alarm me!
Tyke. I tell you what—I'll take care of this for

you. (Takes the purse.)

0. Man. Well, sir, you are very kind. You live at the castle ?

Tyke. Yes, yes!

0. Man. Then, perhaps, you could aid a petition I have presented to his lordship-my name is

Tyke. Well, well, let's hear your name.
0. Man. Robert Tyke.
Tyke. Eh !-what !-speak !—no, don't !
0. Man. Robert Tyke !

Tyke. (Trembling violently, rushes to the table, brings down the candle, looks at the Old Man, dashes can:lle and purse on the ground, and tears his hair in agony.) 0, villain !

-villain ! 0. Man. What's the matter? Tyke. Don't

you

know me?

a

Tyke. (Striking his forehead.) Say no more about that, and you shall hear all. Yes, I had a father, and when he heard of my disgrace, the old man walked, wi' heavy heart, I warrant, all the way tid' gaol to see me; and he prayed up to heaven for me (Pointing, but not daring to look up), just the same as if I had still been the pride of his heart.

(Speaks with difficulty, and sighs heavily.) Ld. A. Proceed. Tyke. Presently Ld. A. Did you entrust the child to his care? Tyke. I did. Ld. A. Do not pause--you rack me.

Tyke. Rack you !-well, you shall hear the end on't. -I meant to tell father all about the child; but, when parting came, old man could not speak, and I could not speak—well

, they put me on board a ship, and I saw father kneeling on the shore with the child in his arns

Ld. A. Go on.

Tyke. 'Tis soon said (Collecting his fortitude). When the signal-gun for sailing was fired, I saw my old father drop down dead—and somebody took up child and carried it away. I felt a kind of dizziness; my eyes flashed fire, the blood gushed out of my mouth I saw no more. (Sinks exhausted into chair, L.)

Ld. A. Horrible ! - What! record a father's death without a tear ?

Tyke. Tear! Do you think a villain who has a father's death to answer for can cry? No, no; I feel a pack of dogs worrying my heart, and my eyes on fire-but I can't cry. (Ă vacant stare of horror.)

Ld. A. And is this desolation my work ?-0, repent ! repent !

Tyke. (Starting up.) For what? is not father dead ? an't I a thief ?-cursed — hated-hunted ?- -Why should I be afraid of the Devil ? Don't I feel him here? My mouth's parched-

Ld. A. Within is wine,

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Tyke. Brandy! brandy!
Ld. A. Compose yourself—follow me—(Crosses L.)

-) -you want sleep. Tyke. Sleep! ha! ha! under the sod I may. [Points down, and groans heavily. Exit, follow

,
ing LORD AVONDALE, L.

Inside of Cottage.Table, and a candle burning on it.Old Man seated R., looking on

a purse. —TYKE sitting, L. 0. Man. Pray, sir, who is that generous youth?

Tyke. Why, he's a kind of a foreman like to Lord Avondale, my friend.

0. Man. Are you the friend of that worthy nobleman ?

Tyke. Yes; between ourselves I have him under my thumb; but I say that out of confidence--you understand. That's a smartish purse you've got there; but, I tell you what, I don't think it's very safe, just

now.

0. Man. Indeed, sir! You alarm me! Tyke. I tell you what—I'll take care of this for you. (Takes the purse.)

0. Man. Well, sir, you are very kind. You live at the castle ?

Tyke. Yes, yes!

0. Man. Then, perhaps, you could aid a petition I have presented to his lordship—my name is

Tyke. Well, well, let's hear your name.
0. Man. Robert Tyke.
Tyke. Eh !—what !--speak !—no, don't !
0. Man. Robert Tyke !

Tyke. (Trembling violently, rushes to the table, brings down the candle, looks at the Old Man, dashes can:lle and purse on the ground, and tears his hair in agony.) O, villain villain !

0. Man. What's the matter ? Tyke. Don't you know me?

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