The Escalating Crisis in Darfur: Are There Prospects for Peace? : Hearing Before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundred Tenth Congress, First Session, February 8, 2007

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Page 41 - Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. We of this Congress and this Administration will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation.
Page 35 - ... production lie, and where much of our electrical power and natural resources are. So what can Congress do? First and foremost, Congress needs to fully fund the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program. Thanks to your leadership Mr. Chairman, and the leadership of many of your colleagues in both Houses and on both sides of the aisle, Congress took a giant step in addressing the needs of America's fire service by creating this grant program and funding...
Page 15 - On the surface, Sudan's political reform has moved forward. The National Congress Party (NCP) and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) formed the Government of National Unity (GNU), organized the parliament and distributed positions at senior levels of government as they had agreed in the CPA (though civil service reform is still outstanding). The SPLM established the Government of southern Sudan in Juba, with a limited number of positions for its NCP partners, and likewise set up the ten...
Page 7 - I thank all of you for being here, and I look forward to hearing your testimony. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Page 15 - ... election process. Despite these serious shortcomings, there has been some progress under the CPA. Peace is holding in the south for the first time in twenty-four years. The GOS has transferred over $1 billion in oil revenues to the new GOSS, with an average of $73 million being transferred each month. A new government has been created in the south, commerce is thriving, the economy is growing, displaced people are returning to their ancestral homes and farms, and 75% of the 40,000 militias (most...
Page 19 - ... crisis in Darfur and the paralysis in the implementation of the CPA is the most desirable alternative and the option most likely to yield success. However, if we find the Sudanese government is obstructing progress on these objectives, the United States government will change its policy of negotiation and will pursue more coercive measures. The burden is on the Sudanese government to show the world that it can meet the commitments it has already made and negotiate rather than fight its way to...
Page 19 - I would like to add a word about international pressure on Khartoum. We are pleased with the emergence of broad international support for the humanitarian needs of citizens in Darfur. Many countries in Africa and around the world have echoed UNSCR 1706 and called publicly for Khartoum to admit UN peacekeepers and abandon its futile effort to impose a solution on Darfur by force. Despite all this, the regime in Khartoum continues to find the weapons it needs for conflict, to find markets for its products,...
Page 36 - Government would disarm the janjaweed, allow unfettered humanitarian access and permit an African Union force to deploy. Yet, predictably, the killing and dying continued. Over the summer of 2004, Secretary Powell ordered a comprehensive investigation of the human rights violations that drew upon hundreds of first hand accounts. Faced with the evidence, Secretary Powell embraced the investigators conclusions: genocide was taking place. To his credit, he testified that effect, and the President in...
Page 13 - ... and to pay Northern Arab tribes, now called the Janjiweed militias, as their proxies in the war. Arming the Janjiweed led to the launching of genocide in 2003 and 2004, which resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians and the destruction of their villages and livelihoods. In addition, regional political agendas are being played out in Darfur and the consequences have reached beyond the Sudanese border into both Chad and the Central African Republic (CAR). The Darfur...
Page 37 - В immediately. The Order should include safeguards to ensure that revenue flows to the Government of South Sudan remain unaffected. Given yesterday's leak of the contours of Plan B, the President must act now or risk squandering the potentially significant impact of these measures.

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