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Supplemental Journal.

on the communications from the President, from our don S. Mumford, Timothy Pitkin, jr., Josiah Quincy, respective Ministers at Paris and London, be taken John Randolph, John Russell, Richard Stanford, Wiloff, and that the same be published, with the exception liam Stedman, Lewis B. Sturges, Peter Swart, Samof the extract of a letter from General Armstrong to uel Taggart, Benjamin Tallmadge, Jabez Upham, Ar. the Secretary of State, dated Paris, twenty-seventh of chibald Van Horn, Killian K. Van Rensselaer, David December, one thousand eight hundred and seven. R. Williams, and Nathan Wilson. And on the question that the House do agree kiel Bacon, David Bard, Joseph Barker, William Black

Nays-Lemuel J. Alston, Willis Alston, jr., Ezeto the same, it passed in the negative-yeas 29, ledge, John Blake, jr., Thomas Blount, Adam Boyd, Days 82, as follows: YxasJohn Campbell, Epaphroditus Champion, Calhoun, Matthew Clay,John Clopton, Orchard Cook,

John Boyle, Robert Brown, William Butler, Joseph Martin Chittenden, John Davenport, jr., Daniel M. Richard Cutts, John Dawson, Josiah Deane, Joseph Durell, William Ely, James M. Garnett, Edwin Gray, Desha, William Findley, James Fisk, Meshack FrankJohn Harris, William Hoge, Richard Jackson, Joseph lin, Francis Gardner, Thomas Gholson, jr., Peterson Lewis, jr., Edward St. Loe Livermore, Edward Lloyd, Goodwyn, Isaiah L. Green, John Heister, William Nathaniel Macon, Josiah Masters, John Morrow, Jon Helms, James Holland, Reuben Humphreys, Daniel athan 0. Mosely, Roger Nelson, Josiah Quincy, John Ilsley, John G. Jackson, John Lambert, Nathaniel Randolph, John Russell, Samuel Shaw, William Sted- Macon, William McCreery, Daniel Montgomery, jr., man, Lewis B. Sturges, Abram Trigg, Jabez Upham, John Montgomery, Jeremiah Morrow, John Morrow, Killian K. Van Rensselaer, and David R. Williams.

Roger Nelson, Thomas Newbold, Wilson C. Nicholas, Nays—Lemuel J. Alston, Willis Alston, jr., Ezekiel John Rea of Pennsylvania, John Rhea of Tennessee, Bacon, David Bard, Joseph Barker, William W. Bibb, Jacob Richards, Matthias Richards, Samuel Riker, BenWilliam Blackledge, John Blake, jr., Thomas Blount, jamin Say, Ebenezer Seaver, Samuel Shaw, James Adam Boyd, John Boyle, Robert Brown, William A. Sloan, John Smilie, Jedediah K. Smith, John Smith, Burwell, William Butler, Joseph Calhoun, Matthew Henry Southard, Clement Storer, John Taylor, John Clay, John Clopton, Orchard Cook, John Culpeper, Thompson, Abram Trigg, George M. Troup, James I. Richard Cutts, Samuel W. Dana, John Dawson, Josiah Van Alen, Daniel C. Verplanck, Jesse Wharton, RobDeane, Joseph Desha, James Elliot, John W. Eppes, ert Whitehill, Isaac Wilbour, and Richard Winn. William Findley, James Fisk, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, jr., Peterson Goodwyn, Isaiah L. Green, John Heister, William Helms, James Holland,

Friday, November 25. Benjamin Howard, Reuben Humphreys, Daniel Ilsley, The House being cleared of all persons, except John G. Jackson, Robert Jenkins, Richard M. Johnson, the members and ihe Clerk, a motion was made John Lambert, John Love, Robert Marion, William by Mr. RANDOLPH, that the House do come to McCreery, William Milnor, Daniel Montgomery, jr. ihe following resolution : John Montgomery, Jeremiah Morrow, Gurdon 8. Mumford, Thomas Newbold, Thomas Newton, Wilson C.

“ That the Secret Journal be published," Nicholas, Timothy Pitkin, jr., John Rea of Pennsyl The question was taken that the House do now vania, John Rhea of Tennessee, Jacob Richards, Mat- proceed to consider the said proposed resolution, thias Richards, Samuel Riker, Benjamin Say, Ebene- and was resolved in the affirmative-yeas 101, zer Seaver, James Sloan, John Smilie, Jedediah K. Days 16, as follows: Smith, John Smith, Henry Southard, Richard Stanford, Yeas-Willis Alston, jr., Ezekiel Bacon, Joseph Clement Storer, Peter Swart, Samuel Taggart, Benja- Barker, Burwell Bassett, William W. Bibb, William min Tallmadge, John Taylor, John Thompson, George Blackledge, John Blake, jr., John Boyle, Robert Brown, M. Troup, James I. Van Alen, Archibald Van Horn, William Butler, Joseph Calhoun, John Campbell, Daniel C. Verplanck, Jesse Wharton, Robert Whitehill, Epaphroditus Champion, Martin Chittenden, Matthew Isaac Wilbour, Nathan Wilson, and Richard Winn.

Clay, John Clopton, John Culpeper, Samuel W. Dana, A motion was then made by Mr. RANDOLPH, John Davenport, jr., John Dawson, Joseph Desha, that the House do come to the following reso- Daniel M. Durell, James Elliot, William Ely, John W. lution :

Eppes, James Fisk, Meshack Franklin, Barent GardeResolved, That the injunction of secrecy, so far as nier, Francis Gardner, James M. Garnett, Thomas it relates to the substance of the communications from Gholson, jr., Peterson Goodwyn, Edwin Gray, John our respective Ministers at Paris and London, which Harris, William Hoge, James Holland, David Holmes, accompanied the President's Message of the eighth in- Benjamin Howard, Daniel Ilsley, John G. Jackson, stant, be taken off, with the exception of the extract of Richard Jackson, Robert Jenkins, Richard M. Johna letter from General Armstrong to the Secretary of son, Walter Jones, John Lambert, Joseph Lewis, jr., State, dated Paris, December twenty-seventh, one

Edward St. Loe Livermore, Edward Lloyd, Nathaniel thousand eight hundred and seven:

Macon, Robert Marion, William McCreery, William And the question being taken thereupon, it Jeremiah Morrow, John Morrow, Jonathan 0. Mosely,

Milnor, Daniel Montgomery, jr., John Montgomery, passed in the negative-yeas 39, nays 67, as fol- Gurdon S. Mumford, Thomas Newbold, Thomas New

ten, Timothy Pitkin, jr., John Porter, Josiah Quincy, YEAsJohn Campbell, Epaphroditus Champion, John Randolph, John Rea of Pennsylvania, John Rhea Martin Chittenden, John Culpeper, Samuel W. Dana, of Tennessee, Jacob Richards, Matthias Richards, SamJohn Davenport, jr., Daniel M. Durell, James Elliot, uel Riker, John Russell, Benjamin Say, Ebenezer William Ely, Barent Gardenier, James M. Garnett, Seaver, Samuel Shaw, James Sloan, Dennis Smelt, Edwin Gray, John Harris, William Hoge, Richard Jedediah K. Smith, John Smith, Samuel Smith, Henry Jackso Robert Jen) seph Lewis, jr., Edward Southard, Richard Stanford, William Stedman, CleSt. Loe Livermore, Edward Lloyd, Robert Marion, ment Storer, Lewis B. Sturges, Peter Swart, Samuel Josiah Masters, Wm. Milnor, Jonathan 0. Mosely, Gur- Taggart, Benjamin Tallmadge, John Taylor, John

lows:

Supplemental Journal.

Thompson, Abram Trigg, George M. Troup, Jabez !hat the House do come to the foilowing resoUpham, James I. Van Alen, Philip Van Cortlandt, lution : Archibald Van Horn, Killian K. Van Rensselaer, Dan Resolved, That the injunction of secrecy imposed iel C. Verplanck, Jesse Wharton, Isaac Wilbour, Da- on the letters and extracts from our Ministers at Paris vid R. Williams, Alexander Wilson, and Nathan and London, accompanying the Message of the PresiWilson.

dent of the United States of the eighth instant, except Nars-Lemuel J. Alston, David Bard, Thomas the letter of Mr. Armstrong, of the twenty-seventh of Blount, Adam Boyd, Orchard Cook, Richard Cutts, December, one thousand eight hundred and seven, and Josiah Deane, William Findley, Isaiah L. Green, John the words contained in the parenthesis of Mr. PinkHeister, William Helms, Reuben Humphreys, Wilson ney's letter of the twenty-sixth of January, one thouC. Nicholas, John Smilie, Robert Whitehill, and Rich- sand eight hundred and eight, be removed. ard Winn.

The question was taken that the House agree The question was then taken that the House do agree to the said resolution, and resolved in to the said proposed resolution, and passed in the the affirmative-yeas 95, nays 23, as follows:

negative-yeas 43, nays 72, as follows: YEAs—Willis Alston, jun., Ezekiel Bacon, Joseph Jitus Champion, Martin Chittenden, John Culpeper,

Yeas-Burwell Bassett, John Campbell, EpaphroBarker, Burwell Bassett, William W. Bibb, William Samuel W. Dana, John Davenport, jr.

, Daniel M. DuBlackledge, John Blake, jr., William A. Burwell

, John rell, James Elliot, William Ely, James Fisk, Barent Campbell, Epaphroditus Champion, Martin Chitten- Gardenier, James M. Garnett, Edwin Gray, John Harden, Matthew Clay, Jolin Clopton, John Culpeper, ris, William Hoge, Richard Jackson, Joseph Lewis, jr., Richard Cutts, Samuel W. Dana, John Davenport, jr., Edward St. Loe Livermore, Edward Loyd, Nathan. John Dawson, Joseph Desha, James Elliot, William iel Macon, Josiah Masters, John Morrow, Jonathan 0. Ely, John W. Eppes, Meshack Franklin, Barent Gar- Mosely, Gurdon S. Mumford, Roger Nelson, Timothy denier, Francis Gardner, James M. Garnett, Thomas Pitkin, junior, Josiah Quincy, John Randolph, Samuel Gholson, jr., Peterson Goodwyn, Edwin Gray, John Riker, John Russell, Samuel Shaw, Samuel Smith, Harris, William Hoge, David Holmes, Benjamin How- William Stedman, Lewis B. Sturges, Peter Swart

, ard, Daniel Ilsley, John G. Jackson, Richard Jackson, Benjamin Tallmadge, Abram Trigg, Jabez Upham, Robert Jenkins, Richard M. Johnson, Walter Jones, Philip Van Cortlandt, Archibald Van Horn, Killian K. William Kirkpatrick, John Lambert, Joseph Lewis, Van Rensselaer, and David R. Williams. junior, Edward St. Loe Livermore, Edward Lloyd, Nathaniel Macon, Robert Marion, Josiah Masters, Wil

Nars--Lemuel J. Alston, Willis Alston, jr., Ezeliam McCreery, Daniel Montgomery, jun., John Mont- kiel Bacon, David Bard, Joseph Barker, William W. gomery, Jeremiah Morrow, John Morrow, Jonathan 0. Bibb, William Blackledge, John Blake, jun., Thomas Mosely, Gurdon 8. Mumford, Roger Nelson, Thomas Blount, Adam Boyd, Robert Brown, William A. BurNewbold, Thomas Newton, Timothy Pitkin, jr., John well, William Butler, Joseph Calhoun, Matthew Clay, Porter, Josiah Quincy, John Randolph, John Rea of John Clopton, Orchard Cook, Richard Cutts, John Pennsylvania, John "Rhea of Tennessee, Jacob Rich Dawson, Josiah Deane, Joseph Desha, William Findards, Matthias Richards, Samuel Riker, John Russell, ley, Meshack Franklin, Francis Gardner, Thomas Benjamin Say, Samuel Shaw, James Sloan. Jedediah Gholson, jr., Peterson Goodwyn, Isaiah L. Green, John K. Smith, John Smith, Samuel Smith, Henry South-Heister, Wm. Helms, James Holland, David Holmes, ard, Richard Stanford, William Stedman, Clement Benjamin Howard, Reuben Humphreys, Daniel Ilsley, Storer, Lewis B. Sturges, Peter Swart, Samuel Tag- John G. Jackson, Robert Jenkins, Richard M. Johnson, gart, Benjamin Tallmadge, John Thompson, Abram Walter Jones, William Kirkpatrick, John Lambert, Trigg, George M. Troup, Jabez Upham, James I. Van Robert Marion, William McCreery, William Milnor, Alen, Philip Van Cortlandt, Archibald Van Horn, Daniel Montgomery, jr., John Montgomery, Jeremiah Killian K. Van Rensselaer, Daniel C. Verplanck, Jesse Morrow, Thomas Newbold, Thomas Newton, Wilson Wharton, Isaac Wilbour, David R. Williams, Alexan-C. Nicholas, John Porter, John Rea of Pennsylvania, der Wilson, and Nathan Wilson.

John Rhea of Tennessee, Matthias Richards, Benjamin Nays-Lemuel J. Alston, David Bard, Thos. Blount, Say, Ebenezer Scaver, James Sloan, Dennis Śmelt, Adam Boyd, John Boyle, Robert Brown, William But. John Smilie, Jedediah K. Smith, John Smith, Henry ler, Joseph Calhoun, Orchard Cook, Josiah Deane, Southard, Richard Stanford, Clement Storer, John Daniel M. Durell, William Findley, Isaiah L. Green, Taylor, George M. Troup, James I. Van Alen, Daniel John Heister, William Helms, James Holland, Wilson C. Verplanck, Jesse Wharton, Robert Whitehill, Isaac C. Nicholas, Ebenezer Seaver, Dennis Smelt, John Wilbour, Alexander Wilson, and Richard Winn. Smilie, John Taylor, Robert Whitehill, and Richard On motion of Mr. Macon, Winn.

Ordered, That ihe Secret Journal of this day A motion was made by Mr. D. R. WILLIAMS, I be published.

TO THE HISTORY OF THE TENTH CONGRESS.

[SECOND SESSION.]

COMPRISING THE MOST IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS ORIGINATING DURING THAT CON.

GRESS, AND THE PUBLIC ACTS PASSED BY IT

GREAT BRITAIN.

Foreign Department; all of which bave been re

ceived here since the last session of Congress. [Communicated to Congress, November 8, 1808, Jan To these documents are added a communica

uary 17 and 30, 1809, and June 16, 1809.] tion just made by Mr. Erskine to the Secretary of To the Senate and House of

State, and his answer.*
Representatives of the United States :

JAMES MADISON. I communicate to Congress certain letters which JUNE 15, 1809. passed between Mr. Canning, the British Secreiary of State, and Mr. Pinkney, our Minister Ple Extract, The Secretary of State to Mr. Pinkney, Minnipotentiary at London. When the documents

ister of the United States at London. concerning the relations between the United

DEPARTMENT OF State, March 8, 1808. States and Great Britain were laid before Con

Having just learned that the present mail will gress, at the commencement of the session, the answer of Mr. Pinkney to the letter of Mr. Can- arrive at New York in time for the British packet,

I avail myself of the opportunity of forwarding ning had not been received, and a communication of the latter alone would have accorded neither your commission and letters of credence, as sucwith propriety nor the wishes of Mr. Pinkney.

cessor to Mr. Monroe, in the legation at London. When that answer afterwards arrived, it was con

Since my last, which went by Mr. Nourse, in sidered that as what had passed in conversation a despatch vessel

, bound first to L'Orient, and then had been superseded by the written and formal tions of the 231 November, and of – December.

to Falmouth, I have received your communicacorrespondence on the subject, the variance in the statements of what had verbally passed was

These, with a representation from General Armnot of sufficient importance to be made the mat- strong to the French Government on the subject ter of a distinct and special communication; the of the decree of Berlin, as expounded and enletter of Mr. Canning, however, having lately forced in the case of the ship Horizon, were appeared in print, unaccompanied by thiae of M?. thought by the President to throw so much light Pinkney in reply, and having a tendency to make on the course likely to be pursued by Great Brito impressions not warranted by the statements of ain and France in relation to the United States, Mr. Pinkney, it has become proper that the whole that he had the documents confidentially laid beshould be brought into public view.

sore Congress. TH. JEFFERSON.

Mr. Erskine has made a written communica. JANUARY 17, 1809.

tion on the subject of the British orders. I shall

answer him as soon as the very urgent business To the Senate and House of

on hand will permit. Representatives of the United States: I transmit to Congress a letter recently received

Mr. Madison to Mr. Pinkney. from our Minister at the Court of St. James, cor DEPARTMENT OF STATE, March 22, 1808. ering one to him from the British Secretary of My last bore date the 8th instant, and went by State, with his reply. These are communicated, the British packet. It acknowledged your letter as forming a sequel to the correspondence which of November 23d, and — December. I have since accompanied my Message to both Houses of the received those referred to in the latter, and, also, 17th instant.

that of January 26, which came to hand last TH. JEFFERSON. evening. JANUARY 30, 1809.

I cannot enclose my answer to Mr. Erskine's

communication of the British orders; the unTo the Senate of the United States :

ceasing pressure of other matters, on a state of In compliance with the resolution of the Senate bealth still feeble, having thus far delayed it. of the 13th instant, I transmit extracts from lel. You will anticipate the complexion which will ters from Mr. Pinkney to the Secretary of State, accompanied by letters and communications to * These documents are annexed to those communie him, from the British Secretary of State for the I cated the 230 May, 1808.

10th Con. 2d Sess.-51

Relations with Great Britain.

necessarily be given to it by the character of with no condition, unless it be chat, on the receipt measures, not only violating our rights, and slab of the act of reparation here, the proclamation of hing our interests, but superadding, uoder the July 2d shall be revoked; and provided the repnanie of indulgences, a blow at our national in- aration shall add to the disavowal of the attack dependence, and a mockery of our understandings on the Chesapeake an express engagement that

the seamen retained shall be immediately reExtract,Mr. Madison to Mr. Pinkney.

stored, and that the guilty officer experience an

exemplary punishment. The reparation will be DEPARTMENT OF State, April 4, 1808.

the more satisfactory, and not exceed a just exSir: My last was of March 22, and went under pectation, if the restoration of the searaen be the care of Mr. Rose. I now forward printed made to the very ship from which they were copies of the correspondence with him on the wrested, and if provision be made for the woundsubject of his mission, and of the anteredent doc. ed survivors, and for the families of those who uments, relating to the case of the Chesapeake. lost their lives by the attack. As soon as the voluminous residue of the com I must repeat, however, that it is considered munications made to Congress issues from the entirely proper that the reparation should be of. press, it shall also be forwarded. You will find fered here, rather than in London; and it is ooly ibat ihey include certain documents relating to in the event of a decided repugnance in the BritFrance, which were thought proper for the knowl- ish Government to make it through a functionary edge of Congress at the present crisis.

here, that you are to accept it there. To those communications I add copies of Mr. The apswer 10 Mr. Erskine's letter on the BritErskine's letter to ine on the subject of the British orders will furnish the grounds to be taken in ish decrees of November last, and of my answer. your communications with his Government on And that you may have a view of the ground ihat subject. If the Cabinet can be brought to which has been taken with respect to the French view the orders in their true light, a revocation of decree of November, 1806, and to the judicial the wbole of them cannot fail to take place, unexposition in the case of the Horizon, giving to less they mean to violate every maxim of justice, it an illegal operation agaiost the United States, or are fixed in hostile purposes against the United I enclose copies of two letters to General Arm- States. In not regarding the orders, indeed, as strong on those subjects.

acts of hostility, and in trusting for redress to the The President made to Congress, a few days motives and the means to which they have apago, other communications relating to the present pealed, the United States have given the most crisis with Great Britain and France, among signal proof of their love of peace, and of their which were Mr. Erskine's letter, now enclosed, desire to avoid an interruption of it with the Brit. and a leller from Mr. Champagny, to General ish nation. Armstrong, explaining the course meditated by Still, it is to be understood, that whilst the inthe French Government with respect to the com- sult offered in the attack on the American frigate merce of the United States. These being ex- remains unexpiated, you are not to pledge, or cepted froin the confidential character attached commit your Goveroment to consider a recall of to the others, have been published, and will be the orders as a ground on which a removal of the found among the printed enciosures.' Your letter existing restrictions on the commerce of the Uniof February 26 was enclosed in the communicated States with Great Britain may be justly tion to Congress, but not in the exception. expected.

The conduct of the iwo great contending na The iwo letters to General Armstrong of 224 tions towards this country, as it will now appear May, 1807, and February 8, 1808, are proofs of to it, and to the world, fully displays their mutual the sincerity and impartiality with which the efforts to draw the United States into a war with President has proceeded in relation to the bellig. their adversary. The efforts on both sides are 100 erent parties, and may, perhaps, assist you in relittle disguised to be worthy the discernment of pressing unjust suspicions imbibed by the British either, and are addressed, moreover, to motives Cabinet. It would be happy for all parties, the which prove great ignorance of the character of belligerent as well as the United Staies, if truth the United States, and, indeed, of human nature. could, in this case, be made to prevail, and if the

From the posture in which Mr. Rose's final retaliating rivalship of the former against the reply to the compromise proposed to him placed latter could be converted into an emulation, as the question of adjustment in the case of the politic as it would be magnanimous in both, to Chesapeake, it remains with the British Govern- iako the lead in a fair, lawful, and conciliatory ment to resume it, if adjustment be their object. course towards a nation which has done no wrong Whether a tender of reparation will be made to either. Should the experiment be made on here, or 10 you, will also lie on that side. It will either side, it would probably be followed on the certainly be most becoming that Government, other, and it could never happen that the side under all circumstances, to make the reparation first doing justice would suffer on that account. bere; and this course might, of right, be insisted In the present state of our relatiobs 10 Great on by this Government. The President, nevar. Britain, ii would be premature to mark out the theless, in the liberal spirit which always governs course to be pursued with respect to further negohirn, authorizes you to accept the reparation, pro- riations on other topics than those above noticed. vided it be tendered spontaneously, be charged You are authorized, however, to continue your

Relations with Great Britain.

interpositions in behalf of our impressed or de doing the same with that of France. The relatained seamen ; and, in the event of a repeal of tion in which a revocation of its unjust decrees the British orders, and of satisfactory pledges for by either will place the United States to the other repairing the aggression on the Chesapeake, to is obvious, and ought to be a motive to the measenier into informal arrangements for abolishing ure, proportioned to the desire which has been in pressments altogether, and mutually discontin- manifested by each to produce collision between uing to receive the seamen of each other into the United States and its adversary, and which either military or merchant service, conformably must be equally felt by each to avoid one with to the instructions on this point transmitted by itself. Mr. Purviance.

Should the French Government revoke so You will find, by a passage in Mr. Rose's reply much of its decrees as violate our neutral rights, of March 17, that the British Government does or give explanations and assurances having the pot maintain the principle that the obligation of like effect, and entitling it, therefore, to a removal the United States extends beyond the discharge of the embargo as it applies to France, it will be of deserters from their

public service; and, by impossible to view a perseverance of Great Britan order of the Navy Department here, already ain in her retaliating orders in any other light carried into execution, of which a copy is enclosed, than that of war, without even the pretext now that it has lately been decided that no foreign sea- assumed by her. men, whether deserters or not, shall serve on board In order to entitle the British Government to a our ships of war. The principles respectively discontinuance of the embargo, as it applies to manifested by these documents ought to facilitate Great Britain, it is evident that all its decrees, as such an adjustment as is contended for by the well those of January, 1807, as of Njvember, United Stales.

1807, ought to be rescinded, as they apply to the

United States, and this is the rather to be looked Mr. Madison to Mr. Pinkney.

for from the present Administration, as it has so

strenuously contended that the decrees of both Department of State, April 30, 1808.

dates were founded on the same principles and My last was of the 4th instant, and went by a directed to the same object. British packet from New York. I now forward Should the British Government take this course, a copy of it. Congress ended their session on the you may authorize an expectation that the Presinight of the 25th instant. The series of news- dent will, within a reasonable time, give effect to papers herewith sent affords a view of their pro- the authority vested in him on the subject of the ceedings subsequent to the communications last embargo laws. Should the orders be rescinded made to you. Some other points are included, in part only, it must be left to his free judgment which throw light on the workings of public to decide on the case. In either event, you will opinion and the state of public affairs.

lose no time in transmitting the information to You will find that the critical posture of our for- this Department, and to General Armstrong, and, eign relations has produced provisions of different particularly, in the event of such a course being kinds for our greater security, and particularly that iaken by the British Government as will render no pains have been spared to stop, every leak by a suspension of the embargo certain or probable, which the effect of the embargo laws might be it will be proper for you to make the communicadiminished. I refer you also to the report made to tion, by a courier, to General Armstrong, to whom the Senate, by a committee on the documents rela. a correspondent instruction will be given; and, to ting to the affair of the Chesapeake, and on the leto provide a special conveyance for it hither, unless ters of Mr. Champagny and Mr. Erskine; and in- British arrangements shall present an opportudicating the spirit which may be expected to in- nity equally certaio and expeditious. fluence the future policy of this country, if kept under the excitement resulting from the system now pursued against it.

Extract Mr. Pinkney to Mr. Madison. You will observe, at the same time, that whilst

LONDON, May 9, 1808. a determination is sufficiently evinced against a I had a conversation with Mr. Canning on dishonorable acquiesence in the despotic edicts Friday last, in consequence of the arrival of the enforced on the high seas, the United States are Osage. ready to resime their export trade, as soon as the As it was obviously expected that I should aggressions on it shall cease; and that, in a hope seek an interview with him, I went to Downing that this might happen during the recess of Con- street on the 5th with shat object. He had been gress, the President is authorized, in such an indisposed, and was not at his office; but, in aneveni, to suspend, in whole or in part, the several swer to a note which I sent him in the evening, embargo laws.

he asked to see me next day at his house in BruThe conditions on which the authority is to be ton street. exercised appeal equally to the justice and policy The Osage had for some time been looked for of the two great belligerent Powers, which are with considerable anxiety, and the Government now emulating each other in a violation of both. had apparently anticipated a communication (and The President counts on your endeavors to give perhaps a proposal) of some importance from me, to this appeal all the effeci possible with the Brit- as soon as my despatches should be received. As ish Government. General Armstrong will be I had, in fact, no communication to make, it seem

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