A History of the Thirty-first Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion

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Western Methodist book concern, 1900 - United States - 226 pages
 

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Page 114 - SHERMAN: I have just received your dispatch announcing the capture of Atlanta. In honor of your great victory, I have ordered a salute to be fired with shotted guns from every battery bearing upon the enemy.
Page 72 - ARMY OF THE OHIO — MAJOR-GENERAL SCHOFIELD COMMANDING. Infantry 11,183 Artillery . ./ 679 Cavalry 1,697 Total 13,559 Guns 28 Grand aggregate number of troops 98,797 Guns. 254 About these figures have been maintained during the campaign, the number of men joining from furlough and hospitals about compensating for the loss in battle and from sickness.
Page 113 - The national thanks are tendered by the President to Major-General William T. Sherman, and the gallant officers and soldiers of his command before Atlanta, for the distinguished ability, courage, and perseverance displayed in the campaign in Georgia, which, under divine favor, has resulted in the capture of Atlanta. The marches, battles, sieges, and other military operations that have signalized the campaign must render it famous in the annals of war, and have entitled those who have participated...
Page 41 - ... position, and apparently exactly to the rear, in the woods. It was impossible to get ammunition up, to communicate with the general commanding the division, or to obtain reenforcements. In this condition the ground was still held for some forty minutes longer than seemed right or proper. My command had some cover in the edge of the woods from the enemy's bullets, and still kept up a fire sufficiently strong to keep them from rushing into the woods. Seeing my little brigade failing rapidly, and...
Page 16 - ... Dover, by storm... The officers and men, though much fatigued from the action of the morning, and w'orn from loss of rest and lack of food, responded cheerfully to the order, and wheeled into column. The enemy was in force on the hill, under cover of the wood on both sides of the only road leading up in the direction of the works.
Page 42 - ... sufficiently strong to keep them from rushing into the woods. Seeing my little brigade failing rapidly, and many of its best men carried wounded to the rear, without hope of support, or further ability to hold on, I withdrew it in as good order as practicable. The enemy pressed closely, firing constantly into the retreating mass. We faced to rear, and covered the retreat of General Negley's men as well . as could be done. The Second Kentucky...
Page 113 - Atlanta, for the distinguished ability, courage, and perseverance displayed in the campaign in Georgia, which, under divine favor, has resulted in the capture of Atlanta. The marches, battles, sieges, and other military operations that have signalized the campaign must render it famous in the annals of war, and have entitled those who have participated therein to the applause and thanks of the nation.
Page 15 - Wallace, or get despatches to him, and information being casually received that the main line had been established further back, it was deemed prudent to retire upon it. This was accordingly done, and the brigade was formed in column and marched to the high ground just north of the hospital buildings, with a view to protect them, to form part of the main line, and to watch the enemy on our right. Upon communicating with the General commanding division, the position was regarded by him as well taken,...
Page 41 - ... of flanking parties that had already passed to the right and left of the line, and in face of two of the enemy's batteries. The rear line (now front) was soon actively engaged. I attempted with it to assail the enemy, and ordered an advance. The First Kentucky, Colonel Enyart, on the right of the line, made a gallant charge, and drove the enemy before it, rushing forward to the crest of the hill, clear beyond and to the right of the burnt house. The fire was so severe from the enemy's force at...
Page 15 - The fight was still progressing, but at this time the regiment to our left, supporting the battery, gave way (from want of ammunition, as was said), and a portion rushed into our rear, creating some confusion in the Forty-fourth Indiana, carrying with them some men of that regiment and exposing it to the flanking fire of the enemy, who appeared at that point with a considerable force of both cavalry and infantry.

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