Washington

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J. Murray, 1840 - 230 pages
 

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Page 88 - Envious of none, I am determined to be pleased with all ; and this, my dear friend, being the order for my march, I will move gently down the stream of life, until I sleep with my fathers.
Page 95 - We have errors to correct. We have probably had too good an opinion of human nature in forming our confederation. Experience has taught us, that men will not adopt and carry into execution measures the best calculated for their own good, without the intervention of a coercive power.
Page 47 - I had four bullets through my coat, and two horses shot under me, yet escaped unhurt, though death was levelling my companions on every side of me...
Page 88 - Potomac ; and, under the shadow of my own vine and my own fig-tree, free from the bustle of a camp, and the busy scenes of public life, I am solacing myself with those tranquil enjoyments, of which the soldier, who is ever in pursuit of fame, — the statesman, whose watchful days and sleepless nights are spent in devising schemes to promote the welfare of his own...
Page 101 - About ten o'clock I bade adieu to Mount Vernon, to private life, and to domestic felicity ; and, with a mind oppressed with more anxious and painful sensations than I have words to express, set out for New York in company with Mr.
Page 46 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 132 - By some he is considered as an ambitious man, and therefore a dangerous one. That he is ambitious, I shall readily grant, but it is of that laudable kind, which prompts a man to excel in whatever he takes in hand. He is enterprising, quick in his perceptions, and his judgment intuitively great; qualities essential to a military character, and therefore I repeat, that his loss will be irreparable.
Page 190 - With me, a predominant motive has been to endeavor, to gain time to our country to settle and mature its yet recent institutions, and to progress, without interruption, to that degree of strength and consistency which is necessary to give it, humanely speaking, the command of its own fortunes.
Page 36 - I am now convinced beyond a doubt, that, unless some great and capital change suddenly takes place in that line, this army must inevitably be reduced to one or other of these three things ; starve, dissolve, or disperse in order to obtain subsistence in the best manner they can.
Page 203 - That there existed a general desire of independence of the crown," says Mr. John Adams, " in any part of America, before the revolution, is as far from the truth as the zenith from the nadir." " For my own part, there was not a moment during the revolution, when I would not have given every thing I possessed for a restoration to the state of things before the contest began, provided we could have had a sufficient security for its continuance.

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