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ent day, I have never had cause of complaint .... I have been astonished at the readiness with which everything asked for has been yielded, without even an explanation being asked." Apart from direct communications with military commanders, relating to campaign operations, there were many things said of more general nature, conversationally and publicly, and many things written, which exhibit the character of the man, and suggest his methods of dealing with his multiform and trying circumstances.

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SPEECH AT CINCINNATI, O., SEPT., 1859.

“The good old maxims of the Bible are applicable, and truly applicable, to human affairs, and in this, as in other things, we may say here that he who is not for us is against us; he who gathereth not with us scattereth."

REPLY TO ONE OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE PEACE CONGRESS, WASH

INGTON, FEB. 24, 1861.

“In a choice of evils, war may not always be the worst. Still, I would do all in my power to avert it, except to neglect a Constitutional duty.”

INAUGURAL ADDRESS, MARCH 4, 1861.

“Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better, or equal, hope in the world? In our present differences, is either party without faith of being in the right ?”

CONVERSATIONAL, 1861.

“ This is our own affair. It is a family quarrel with which foreign nations have nothing to do, and they must let it alone."

CONVERSATION, NOV. 15, 1861. “ My own impression is ... that this Government

possesses both the authority and the power to maintain its own integrity. That, however, is not the ugly point of this matter. The ugly point is the necessity of keeping the Government together by force, as ours should be a Government of fraternity.”

FIRST ANNUAL MESSAGE, DEC. 3, 1862.

“A nation which endures factious domestic divisions, is exposed to disrespect abroad; and one party, if not both, is sure, sooner or later, to invoke foreign

foreign intervention. Nations thus tempted to interfere are not always able to resist the councils of seeming expediency and ungenerous ambition, although measures adopted under such influences seldom fail to be unfortu

nate and injurious to those adopting them.”

CONVERSATIONAL. “Gold is good, in its place ; but living, brave and patriotic men are better than gold."

LETTER

W.

TO HON. H. SEWARD,

JUNE 28. 1862. I expect to continue this contest until successful, or till I die, or am conquered, or my term expires, or Congress or the country forsakes me; and I would publicly appeal to the country for this new force (volunteers for the Army of the Potomac), were it not that I fear a general panic and stampede would follow, so hard is it to have a thing understood as it really is."

CONVERSATION, IN THE MASON-
SLIDELL CASE, DECIDING

TO SURRENDER THEM. “We fought Great Britain for doing just what Captain Wilkes has done. If Great Britain protests against this act and demands their release, we must adhere to our principles of 1812. We must give up these prisoners.

One war at a time !"

LETTER TO CUTHBERT BULLITT,

NEW ORLEANS, JULY 28, 1862. Concerning men in Louisiana, who refused to take sides for or against the Union, yet demanded the protection of the government :

“They are to touch neither a sail nor a pump-line, merely passengers, (dead heads' at that), be carried snug and dry through the storm and safely landed, right side

Nay, more,-even a mutineer is to go untouched, lest these sacred

up.

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