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OF DIVINE PROVI

DENCE.

S time went on, in the daily en

durance of severe trials and the faithful performance of great duties, there came to Mr. Lincoln a distinctly declared development of religious character. He had been reverent, from the first, and even prayerful, but, as the end drew nearer, through all the terrible days of 1864, and the swift weeks given him in 1865, his public and private utterances of belief and trust in God became more frequent aud more fervent. If in his earlier history, before any of these fiery experiences came, he had been open

to the charge of carelessness or semi-skepticism, it was not so now, and no other American statesman has left behind him so full and vigorous a confession of faith.

FAREWELL SPEECH AT SPRINGFIELD ILLS., FEB. II, 1861, SETTING OUT

FOR WASHINGTON. “ Unless the great

God, who assisted him, (Washington) shall be with me and aid me, I must fail. If the same omniscient mind and almighty arm that directed and protected him shall guide and support me, I shall not fail—I shall succeed. Let us all pray that the God of our fathers may not forsake us

now."

TO NEWTON BATEMAN, CONVERSA.

TIONALLY, OCT., 1860. I know there is a God and that he hates injustice and slavery. I

see the storm coming and I know that His hand is in it. If he has a place and work for me—and I think he has—I believe I am ready. I am nothing, but truth is everything. I know I am right because I know that liberty is right, for Christ teaches it, and Christ is God.”

TO THE QUAKERS OF IOWA, JAN. 5, 1862.

“ It is most cheering and encouraging for me to know that in the efforts I have made, and am making, for the restoration of a righteous peace to our country, I am upheld and sustained by the good wishes and prayers of God's people. No one is more deeply than myself aware that without His favor, our highest wisdom is but as foolishness, and that our most strenuous efforts would avail nothing in the shadow of His displeasure. It seems to me that if there be one subject upon which all good men may unitedly agree, it is in imploring the gracious favor of the God of Nations upon the struggle our people are making for the preservation of their precious birthright of civi! and religious liberty.”

REPLY TO COMMITTEE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE NEW SCHOOL PRESBYTERIANS,

MAY, 1863. “It has been my happiness to receive testimonies of a similar nature from, I believe, all denominations of Christians. .. This to

is most gratifying, because from the beginning I saw that the issues of our great struggle depended on the Divine interposition and favor. . . As a pilot, I have used my best exertions to keep afloat our Ship of State, and shall be glad to resign my trust at the

me

appointed time to another pilot more skilful and successful than I may prove. In every case and at all hazards, the Government must be perpetuated. Relying as I do on the Almighty power, and encouraged as I am by these resolutions which you have just read, with the support I receive from Christian men, I shall not hesitate to use all means at my control to secure the termination of the rebellion, and will hope for success."

TO A DEPUTATION FROM ALL THE RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS OF

CHICAGO, SEPT. 13, 1862. “I hope it will not be irreverent for me to say that if it is probable that God would reveal His will to others, on a point so connected with my duty, it might be supposed He would reveal it directly to me ; for, unless I am more deceived in

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