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Anthology of Sayings of

Abraham Lincoln.

HOUSE DIVIDED AGAINST ITSELF

"A house divided against itself cannot stand.” I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved—I do not expect the house to fallbut I do expect it will cease to be divided. Speech at Springfield, III., June 10, 1858, vol. III, P. I.

WITH MALICE TOWARD NONE With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan—to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations. - Second Inaugural Address, Mar. 4, 1865, vol. XI, p. 46.

LET BYGONES BE BYGONES

Let bygones be bygones; let past differences as nothing be; and with steady eye on the real issue, let us reinaugurate the good old "central ideas” of the republic. The human heart is with us. God is with

-Speech at Chicago Banquet, Dec. 10, 1856, vol. II, p. 311.

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FEW THINGS WHOLLY EVIL

The true rule, in determining to embrace or reject anything is not whether it have any evil in it, but whether it have more of evil than of good. There are few things wholly evil or wholly good. Speech on Internal Improvements, June 20, 1848, vol. II, p. 37

FAITH THAT RIGHT MAKES MIGHT

Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith let us to the end dare to do our duty as we understand it.-Address at Cooper Institute, New York City, Feb. 27, 1860, vol. V, p. 328.

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FOOLING THE PEOPLE

You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all of the time. -Speech at Clinton, Ill., Sept. 8, 1858, vol. III, p. 349.

GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. -Gettysburg Address, Nov. 19, 1863, vol. IX, p. 210.

VIOLATION OF LIBERTY Let every man remember that to violate the law is to trample on the blood of his father, and to tear the charter of his own and his children's liberty.Lyceum Address, Jan. 27, 1837, vol. I, p. 43.

READING THROUGH AN EAGLE The plainest print cannot be read through a gold eagle. -Speech at Springfield, III., June 26, 1857. vol. II, p. 338.

POWER OF PUBLIC OPINION In this age, and in this country, public sentiment is everything. With it, nothing can fail; against it, nothing can succeed.-Notes for Speeches, Oct. I, 1858, vol. IV, p. 222.

CONTROLLED BY EVENTS I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me. Letter to A. G. Hodges, Apr. 4, 1864, vol. X, p. 68.

STAND WITH THE RIGHT

Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he is right, and part with him when he goes wrong.—Speech at Peoria, III. Oct. 16, 1854, vol. II, p. 243.

EMANCIPATION IRREVOCABLE

If the people should, by whatever mode or means, make it an executive duty to re-enslave such persons [negroes), another, and not I, must be their instrument to perform it. -Annual Message to Congress, Dec. 6, 1864, vol. X, p. 310.

SEEING THROUGH THE GUINEA

The dissenting minister who argued some theological point with one of the established church was always met by the reply, “I can't see it so.” He opened the Bible and pointed him to a passage, but the orthodox minister replied, “I can't see it so.” Then he showed him a single word—“Can you see that?" "Yes, I see it,” was the reply. The dissenter laid a guinea over the word, and asked “Do you see it now?". Speech at New Haven, Conn., Mar. 6, 1860, vol. V, p. 344.

DIFFERENCE IN CONSCIENCES

Consciences differ in different individuals.Notes for Speeches, Oct. 1, 1858, vol. IV, p. 213.

CLEAR BEFORE HIS OWN CONSCIENCE

At least I should have done my duty, and have stood clear before my own conscience. -Memorandum, Aug. 23, 1864, vol. X, p. 204.

INFLEXIBILITY OF PRINCIPLE Important principles may and must be inflexible.

-Last Public Address, Apr. 11, 1865, Vol. XI, p. 92.

ORIGIN OF THE WILL

Will springs from the two elements of moral sense and self-interest.—Speech at Springfield, II., June 26, 1857, vol. II, p. 338.

EASTERN APHORISM

It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him an aphorism to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words, “And this, too, shall pass away.”— -Agricultural Address, Sept. 30, 1859, vol. V, p. 255.

DEMAND FOR FACTS

No man has needed favors more than I, and, generally, few have been less unwilling to accept them; but in this case favor to me would be injustice to the

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