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“Whether the scene which met her eye, was calculated to increase her faith in the constancy of her spouse, or otherwise, we leave those who are able to judge to decide. We do know, though, that the Major's baggage was removed to another part of the house before many hours had expired, and that he was the recipient of a note from the clerk of the house to the following effect:

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“ DEAR MAJOR:-Having unexpectedly found my uncle, I will relieve you and yours from any further care upon my part, if you

will be so kind as to settle the bill which the clerk will present to you. Adios. L.

P.S. Not having sold my gold yet, it is inconvenient for me to refund you the

dollars which you so kindly loaned to me.

L. “The major is a wiser man: he looks meek, but will fire up upon any allusion being made to mustangs or Spanish widows."

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COLONEL LORIN ANDREWS.

Few braver and more patriotic men than Lorin Andrews ever lived. At the breaking out of the Slaveholders' Rebellion, he was the first man in Ohio to tender his services to Governor Tod. Knowing what would be necessary, he did not wait for the requisition to be made on the State for troops, but hastened to offer his services in whatever position the Governor might designate. He was appointed Colonel of the 4th Infantry, Ohio volunteers, under the President's requisi

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“Whether the scene which met her eye, was calculated to increase her faith in the constancy of her spouse, or otherwise, we leave those who are able to judge to decide. We do know, though, that the Major's bag. gage was removed to another part of the house before many hours had expired, and that he was the recipient of a note from the clerk of the house to the following effect:

“ "DEAR MAJOR:–Having unexpectedly found my uncle, I will relieve you and yours from any further care upon my part, if you will be so kind as to settle the bill which the clerk will present to you. Adios. L.

P.S. Not having sold my gold yet, it is inconvenient for me to refund

you
the

dollars which you so kindly loaned to me.

L' The major is a wiser man: he looks meek, but will fire up upon any allusion heing made to mustangs or Spanis ws.”

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than Lorin An. out of the Slave. man in Ohio to od. Knowing what lit for the requisition

tion, served with the regiment in Western Virginia, with ardor, ability, and fidelity, until he was taken sick in August, 1862, when he returned to his family in Gambier, and died in September following, lamented by all who knew him. The following is submitted as a tribute to his memory:

A good man hath fallen!

A brave man lies low !
And sad is our sorrow,

And deep is our woe!
Though Kenyon bewail him,

In sadness and gloom,
'Twill nothing avail him,

Low in the dark tomb !

No more will he heighten

The fame of her glades;
Nor with science enlighten

Her classical shades.

Ye votries of learning !

Well may ye deplore
So sad a bereavement

To freedom and lore !

At the call of our country

He flew to her aid :
He mounted his charger,

And wielded his blade

How faithful in friendship !

How stern in his wrath!
And woe to the Rebel

That countered his path!
His courage undaunted,

And “onward” his word,
His faith in dry powder,

And trust in the Lord.

But life's toilsome battle,

With him is now o'er ;
Since death has disarmed him,

He armeth no more.

He hath ceased from his labor,

He heareth no call,
His pistols and sabre

Now hang in the hall.

The good man hath fallen

The brave man lies low !
And sad is our sorrow,

And deep is our woe!

STORY XXXVIII.

HOW THE POWDER WAS SAVED FROM EXPLODING.

DURING the engagement the Gunboat Valley City was fighting two Rebel boats at once, working her guns on both sides, when a shell entered her port.bow, passed into her magazine, knocked the head off a half-barrel of powder, and exploded in a locker, which was filled with blue-lights, rockets, and Coston signal lights.

The fire-works were ignited at the instant, and, in the close box, burnt with fury, filling the magazine with sulphurous fumes. The quarter gunner, instead of leaving his post, as most men would have done, at such a terrible juncture, immediately sat upon the open barrel, to keep the sparks from falling into the powder.

Captain J. G. Chaplin, commander of the vessel, called all hands to fire-quarters, but seeing that this would take too many from the guns, said he would go

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