Toilers in the Sea

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1889 - Aquatic habitats - 373 pages
 

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Page 383 - ANCIENT HISTORY FROM THE MONUMENTS. This Series of Books is chiefly intended to illustrate the Sacred Scriptures by the results of recent Monumental Researches in the East. Fcap. 8vo, cloth boards, 2s. each. Assyria, -from the Earliest Times to the Fall of Nineveh.
Page 366 - It is often urged, in respect to some scientific conclusion, that, after all, it is only an hypothesis. But what more have we to guide us in nine-tenths of the most important affairs of daily life than hypotheses, and often very ill-based ones? So that in science, where the evidence of a hypothesis is subjected to the most rigid examination, we may rightly pursue the same course.
Page 383 - Assyria, from the Earliest Times to the Fall of Nineveh. By the late GEORGE SMITH, Esq., of the British Museum.
Page 28 - ... a little particle of apparently homogeneous jelly changing itself into a greater variety of forms than the fabled Proteus, laying hold of its food without members, swallowing it without a mouth, digesting it without a stomach, appropriating its nutritious material without absorbent vessels or a circulating system, moving from place to place without muscles, feeling (if it has any power to do so) without nerves, multiplying itself without eggs ; and not only this, but in many instances forming...
Page 366 - ... to guide us in nine-tenths of the most important affairs of daily life than hypotheses, and often very ill-based ones? So that in science, where the evidence of an hypothesis is subjected to the most rigid examination, we may rightly pursue the same course. You may have hypotheses and hypotheses. A man may say, if he likes, that the moon is made of green cheese: that is an hypothesis.
Page 366 - ... which is based on sound scientific knowledge is sure to have a corresponding value; and that which is a mere hasty, random guess, is likely to have but little value. Every great step in our progress in discovering causes has been made in exactly the same way as that which I have detailed to you. A person observing the occurrence of certain facts and phenomena asks naturally enough, what process, what kind of operation known to occur in nature...
Page 168 - There breed, and die, and leave a progeny, Still multiplied beyond the reach of numbers, To frame new cells and tombs; then breed and die As all their ancestors had done, — and rest, Hermetically...

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