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PHILANTHROPY IN NORTH CAROLINA.

405

Washington at an early period of the The governor evidently looked to the war, as an unpaid, voluntary agent to restoration of the negroes to a state of the army, by the Young Men's Christian slavery, and indeed occupied himself in Association. There he had ministered in authorizing various owners to reclaim camps and in hospitals to the physical this species of human property. Mr. and moral wants of the soldiers; and Colyer, fully appreciating the powers of thence, after the battle of Roanoke island, a military governor, and wishing to do he was sent to North Carolina, amply nothing in conflict with the laws, without provided, by the bounty of the Northern waiting for an order to suppress the cities, to relieve the necessities of the schools, voluntarily closed them, and sick and wounded in that region. Gen- taking a pathetic farewell of his pupils eral Burnside was not the man to suffer left for the north. The course of Goya Christian philanthropist, the represent- ernor Stanley excited much comment, and ative of the benevolence of thousands, his conduct was severely commented upto perform his work of mercy in his army on in those journals which saw in slavery unnoticed. He appreciated those ser- the main source and vitality of the revices most bountifully exhibited on the bellion, and were eagerly waiting the battle field of Newbern, and when the slow, reluctant hand of the government city was occupied, and a superintendent in dealing it a deadly wound. When a of the poor was needed to attend to the simple, religious act of kindness to the absolute necessities of a population sud- slave was interrupted by an officer of the denly deprived of their usual means of government they rigidly held that govsubsistence, General Burnside appointed ernment to account. Mr. Colyer was callMr. Colyer to the office. In this capa- ed upon to address various public meetcity, beside the care of the “contra- ings on the subject in New York and elsebands," he supplied rations to the indi- where, and was admitted to an interview gent white population, numbers of whom at Washington with President Lincoln, belonged to families whose fathers and who listened with interest to his recital, sons were in the rebel army. Some four remarking that, as he had no power to hundred white families, numbering 1,800 interfere with the instruction of negroes persons, were thus provided for. 7,500 in North Carolina, it could hardly be decolored people were in one way or rived from him by a delegated governor. another under Mr. Colyer's supervision. Mr. Colyer, in fact, fortified by a vigorThey furnished 1,500 able-bodied labor- ous expression of public opinion, was left ers, who were employed on the fortifica- at liberty to reopen his schools. Much tions, in service about the transports, feeling, however, had been excited on and other useful occupations.*

the subject; Governor Stanley had been In addition, with the aid of several roughly handled by the press, and there well-disposed officers of the army, he was some soreness in consequence; the opened elementary schools for both mischief had been done at Newbern, and white and black, where reading and it was thought the part of courtesy to writing were taught, and sound religious yield for a time, and not endanger the instruction was given. Governor Stan- peaceful interests of religion and learning ley, on his arrival, witnessed these pro- by exposing them unnecessarily to strife ceedings, and expressed to Mr. Colyer a and contention. If the step had been in doubt of the propriety of teaching nc- the right direction, it would not be pergroes to read and write, when it was for- manently arrested ; and, indeed, in less bidden by the laws of North Carolina. than a year, when the government, in

the progress of the war, had been comReport of the Christian Mission to the United States army, by Vincent Colyer.

pelled to exert its authority in behalf of A permanent foothold having been to the arms of General Burnside and his gained at various important points in divisions, here was an old friend who North Carolina, and numerous represen- would receive the oath of allegiance, and tations having from time to time been smooth the way in the most agreeable made, as we have recorded in the demon- manner possible, to the return of the strations on Hatteras island, of the Union people to the beneficent government of feeling of at least a portion of the inhab- the United States. Unfortunately, the itants, the administration at Washington, minds of the people were so perverted ; with a view of conciliation, determined they were so much under the influence to supplement the authority of General or control of the rebel authorities at Burnside, by the appointment of a so- Richmond ; or they were so uncertain of called military governor, with powers the events of the war, that little or nosimilar to those conferred on Andrew thing was to be done outside of the limJohnson in Tennessee. The Honorable ited area occupied by the United States Edward Stanley, who was selected for forces. The commander-in-chief

, in fact, this appointment, belonged to an old and was the inevitable and only genuine milhonored family in North Carolina, and itary governor of North Carolina. Govhad gained considerable distinction as a ernor Stanley could add nothing to the Whig representative from the State in territory subjected to the Union. In Congress, during the administration of vain, in an address on the 17th of June, President Van Buren. He had, for at Washington, when the citizens of the some years past, pursued his profession neighboring counties were freely admitof the law in California, where he re- ted within the Union lines to the assemceived the commission calling him once bly, he called upon the people of the more to his native State. On his arrival State to return to their allegiance, and at Washington in May, 1862, he received warned them of the danger of persisting his instructions from the War Department in the rebellion. They either could not, and at the close of the month made his or would not, contend against the usurappearance in his new character at New-pation of Jefferson Davis. A conference bern. “It is obvious to you,” wrote proposed by Governor Stanley to GoverSecretary Stanton in a letter of instruc- nor Vance, who was thought not to be tions, that the great purpose of your on the best of terms with the Confederate appointment is to reëstablish the author- government, met with as little success, ity of the national government in the the rebel governor declining the interState of North Carolina, and to provide view. the means of maintaining peace and se- There was some excitement at Newcurity to the loyal inhabitants of that bern immediately upon Governor StanState, until they shall be able to estab- ley's arrival, in reference to the treatment lish a civil government. Upon your of the negro population.. Entertaining wisdom and energetic action much will the hope of freedom, they had welcomed depend in accomplishing that result. It the Union army and rendered it many is not deemed necessary to give any spe- important services. Placed in a depencific instructions, but rather to confide in dent position, they were necessarily cared your sound discretion to adopt such mea- for by the military authorities. It hap

as circumstances may demand." pened opportunely that there was presThe mission, in fact, was a conciliatory ent with the army a gentleman peculiarly expedient, and depended for its force suited to attend to their welfare. This altogether upon the loyal disposition of was Mr. Vincent Colyer, an estimable the inhabitants. If there were any whose artist of New York, who had been inpride would be wounded by submission | duced by his philanthropy to proceed to

.

PHILANTHROPY IN NORTH CAROLINA.

405

Washington at an early period of the The governor evidently looked to the war, as an unpaid, voluntary agent to restoration of the negroes to a state of the army, by the Young Men's Christian slavery, and indeed occupied himself in Association. There he had ministered in authorizing various owners to reclaim camps and in hospitals to the physical this species of human property. Mr. and moral wants of the soldiers ; and Colyer, fully appreciating the powers of thence, after the battle of Roanoke island, a military governor, and wishing to do he was sent to North Carolina, amply nothing in conflict with the laws, without provided, by the bounty of the Northern waiting for an order to suppress the cities, to relieve the necessities of the schools, voluntarily closed them, and sick and wounded in that region. Gen- taking a pathetic farewell of his pupils eral Burnside was not the man to suffer left for the north. The course of Goy. a Christian philanthropist, the represent- ernor Stanley excited much comment, and ative of the benevolence of thousands, his conduct was severely commented upto perform his work of mercy in his army on in those journals which saw in slavery unnoticed. He appreciated those ser- the main source and vitality of the revices most bountifully exhibited on the bellion, and were eagerly waiting the battle field of Newbern, and when the slow, reluctant band of the government city was occupied, and a superintendent in dealing it a deadly wound. When a of the poor was needed to attend to the simple, religious act of kindness to the absolute necessities of a population sud- slave was interrupted by an officer of the denly deprived of their usual means of government they rigidly held that govsubsistence, General Burnside appointed ernment to account. Mr. Colyer was callMr. Colyer to the office. In this capa- ed upon to address various public meetcity, beside the care of the “contra- ings on the subject in New York and elsebands," he supplied rations to the indi-where, and was admitted to an interview gent white population, numbers of whom at Washington with President Lincoln, belonged to families whose fathers and who listened with interest to his recital, sons were in the rebel army. Some four remarking that, as he had no power to hundred white families, numbering 1,800 interfere with the instruction of negroes persons, were thus provided for. 7,500 in North Carolina, it could hardly be decolored people were in one way or rived from him by a delegated governor. another under Mr. Colyer's supervision. Mr. Colyer, in fact, fortified by a vigorThey furnished 1,500 able-bodied labor- ous expression of public opinion, was left ers, who were employed on the fortifica- at liberty to reopen his schools. Much tions, in service about the transports, feeling, however, had been excited on and other useful occupations.*

the subject; Governor Stanley had been In addition, with the aid of several roughly handled by the press, and there well-disposed officers of the army, he was some soreness in consequence; the opened elementary schools for both mischief had been done at Newbern, and white and black, where reading and it was thought the part of courtesy to writing were taught, and sound religious yield for a time, and not endanger the instruction was given. Governor Stan- peaceful interests of religion and learning ley, on his arrival, witnessed these pro- by exposing them unnecessarily to strife ceedings, and expressed to Mr. Colyer a and contention. If the step had been in doubt of the propriety of teaching ne- the right direction, it would not be pergroes to read and write, when it was for- manently arrested ; and, indeed, in less bidden by the laws of North Carolina. than a year, when the government, in

the progress of the war, had been com* Report of the Christian Mission to the United States army, by Vincent Colyer.

pelled to exert its authority in behalf of A permanent foothold baving been to the arms of General Burnside and his gained at various important points in divisions, here was an old friend who North Carolina, and numerous represen- would receive the oath of allegiance, and tations having from time to time been smooth the way in the most agreeable made, as we have recorded in the demon- manner possible, to the return of the strations on Hatteras island, of the Union people to•the beneficent government of feeling of at least a portion of the inhab- the United States. Unfortunately, the itants, the administration at Washington, minds of the people were so perverted ; with a view of conciliation, determined they were so much under the influence to supplement the authority of General or control of the rebel authorities at Burnside, by the appointment of a so- Richmond ; or they were so uncertain of called military governor, with powers the events of the war, that little or nosimilar to those conferred on Andrew thing was to be done. outside of the limJohnson in Tennessee. The Honorable ited area occupied by the United States Edward Stanley, who was selected for forces. The commander-in-chief, in fact, this appointment, belonged to an old and was the inevitable and only genuine milhonored family in North Carolina, and itary governor of North Carolina. Govhad gained considerable distinction as a ernor Stanley could add nothing to the Whig representative from the State in territory subjected to the Union.

In Congress, during the administration of vain, in an address on the 17th of June, President Van Buren. He had, for at Washington, when the citizens of the some years past, pursued his profession neighboring counties were freely admitof the law in California, where he re- ted within the Union lines to the assemceived the commission calling him once bly, he called upon the people of the more to his native State. On his arrival State to return to their allegiance, and at Washington in May, 1862, he received warned them of the danger of persisting his instructions from the War Department in the rebellion. They either could not, and at the close of the month made his or would not, contend against the usurappearance in his new character at New- pation of Jefferson Davis. A conference bern. “It is obvious to you," wrote proposed by Governor Stanley to GoverSecretary Stanton in a letter of instruc- nor Vance, who was thought not to be tions, that the great purpose of your on the best of terms with the Confederate appointment is to reëstablish the author- government, met with as little success, ity of the national government in the the rebel governor declining the interState of North Carolina, and to provide view. the means of maintaining peace and se- There was some excitement at Newcurity to the loyal inhabitants of that bern immediately upon Governor StanState, until they shall be able to estab- ley's arrival, in reference to the treatment lish a civil government. Upon your of the negro population.. Entertaining wisdom and energetic action much will the hope of freedom, they had welcomed depend in accomplishing that result. It the Union army and rendered it many is not deemed necessary to give any spe- important services. Placed in a depencific instructions, but rather to confide in dent position, they were necessarily cared your sound discretion to adopt such mea- for by the military authorities. It hapsures as circumstances may demand."

opportunely that there was presThe mission, in fact, was a conciliatory ent with the army a gentleman peculiarly expedient, and depended for its force suited to attend to their welfare. This altogether upon the loyal disposition of was Mr. Vincent Colyer, an estimable the inhabitants. If there were any whose artist of New York, who had been inpride would be wounded by submission duced by his philanthropy to proceed to

PHILANTHROPY IN NORTH CAROLINA.

405

Washington at an early period of the The governor evidently looked to the war, as an unpaid, voluntary agent to restoration of the negroes to a state of the army, by the Young Men's Christian slavery, and indeed occupied himself in Association. There he had ministered in authorizing various owners to reclaim camps and in hospitals to the physical this species of human property. Mr. and moral wants of the soldiers ; and Colyer, fully appreciating the powers of thence, after the battle of Roanoke island, a military governor, and wishing to do he was sent to North Carolina, amply nothing in conflict with the laws, without provided, by the bounty of the Northern waiting for an order to suppress the cities, to relieve the necessities of the schools, voluntarily closed them, and sick and wounded in that region. Gen- taking a pathetic farewell of his pupils eral Burnside was not the man to suffer left for the north. The course of Gova Christian philanthropist, the represent- ernor Stanley excited much comment, and ative of the benevolence of thousands, his conduct was severely commented upto perform his work of mercy in his army on in those journals which saw in slavery unnoticed. He appreciated those ser- the main source and vitality of the revices most bountifully exhibited on the bellion, and were eagerly waiting the battle field of Newbern, and when the slow, reluctant hand of the government city was occupied, and a superintendent in dealing it a deadly wound. When a of the poor was needed to attend to the simple, religious act of kindness to the absolute necessities of a population sud- slave was interrupted by an officer of the denly deprived of their usual means of government they rigidly held that govsubsistence, General Burnside appointed ernment to account. Mr. Colyer was callMr. Colyer to the office. In this capa- ed upon to address various public meetcity, beside the care of the “contra- ings on the subject in New York and elsebands,” he supplied rations to the indi- where, and was admitted to an interview gent white population, numbers of whom at Washington with President Lincoln, belonged to families whose fathers and who listened with interest to his recital, sons were in the rebel army. Some four remarking that, as he had no power to hundred white families, nuinbering 1,800 interfere with the instruction of negroes persons, were thus provided for. 7,500 in North Carolina, it could hardly be decolored people were in one way or rived from him by a delegated governor. another under Mr. Colyer's supervision. Mr. Colyer, in fact, fortified by a vigorThey furnished 1,500 able-bodied labor- ous expression of public opinion, was left ers, who were employed on the fortifica- at liberty to reopen his schools. Much tions, in service about the transports, feeling, however, had been excited on and other useful occupations.*

the subject; Governor Stanley had been In addition, with the aid of several roughly handled by the press, and there well-disposed officers of the army, he was some soreness in consequence; the opened elementary schools for both mischief had been done at Newbern, and white and black, where reading and it was thought the part of courtesy to writing were taught, and sound religious yield for a time, and not endanger the instruction was given. Governor Stan- peaceful interests of religion and learning ley, on his arrival, witnessed these pro- by exposing theni unnecessarily to strife ceedings, and expressed to Mr. Colyer a and contention. If the step had been in doubt of the propriety of teaching ne- the right direction, it would not be pergroes to read and write, when it was for- manently arrested ; and, indeed, in less bidden by the laws of North Carolina. than a year, when the government, in

the progress of the war, had been com* Report of the Christian Mission to the United States army, by Vincent Colyer.

pelled to exert its authority in behalf of

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