Information Technology and the Criminal Justice System

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SAGE, 2005 - Computers - 293 pages

Information Technology and the Criminal Justice System suggests that information technology in criminal justice will continue to challenge us to think about how we turn information into knowledge, who can use that knowledge, and for what purposes. In this text, editor April Pattavina synthesizes the growing body of research in information technology and criminal justice. Contributors examine what has been learned from past experiences, what the current state of IT is in various components of the criminal justice system, and what challenges lie ahead.

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Contents

Acquiring Implementing and Evaluating Information Technology
29
THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE
57
The Internet as a Conduit for Criminal Activity
77
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
99
Information Technology and Crime Analysis
125
Geographic Information Systems
147
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
167
Using
195
Environment Technology
221
Rules Processes and Routines in Police Work
227
Concluding Remarks
235
THE FUTURE OF INFORMATION
241
The Future of Information Technology
261
Index
273
About the Editor
287
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

April Pattavina, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. Her interests include the impact of information technology on the criminal justice system and applying spatial analysis techniques to the study of crime. In addition to this book, she has published several journal articles in the area of information technology and geographic information systems in particular. One of her most recent articles is Linking Offender Residence Probability Surfaces to a Specific Incident Location: An Application for Tracking Temporal Shifts in Journey to Crime Relationships and Prioritizing Suspect Lists and Mug Shot Order” in (with Richard Gore).forthcoming in Police Quarterly. She is also works extensively with criminal justice agencies. Currently she is principal investigator on a Department of Justice funded grant to integrate criminal justice information related to incidents of domestic violence in a local police department.

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