Public School Methods, Volume 1

Front Cover
Methods Company, 1916 - Teaching
 

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Contents

HOLLOW CONSTRUCTION
42
AIMS OF THE TEACHER
46
DRAMATIZATION
52
RHYTHMS AND GAMES
68
SIMPLE GAMES
72
A YEARS PROGRAM
77
ELEVENTH WEEK
84
SPRING PROGRAM
89
CHAPTER
93
LATER LESSONS
101
LOCAL ERRORS IN PRONUNCIATION
106
ADAPTATION OF THE METHOD TO THE SCHOOL
112
PREPARATION OF A LESSON
119
THE HEKTOGRAPH
124
Little Boy Blue
127
The House that Jack Built
139
The Little Old Woman and Her Pig
146
VALUE OF SUPPLEMENTARY READING MATTER
152
TEACHING CHILDREN TO STUDY
159
RULES FOR CRITICISM
166
MYTHS FABLES AND LEGENDS
173
The Cats TeaParty
177
Golden Locks and the Three Bears
184
Lady Moon
188
The Bad Boy
194
BREATHING
200
SILENT READING AND ORAL READING
206
ILLUSTRATIVE LESSON
208
SELECTION OF READING MATTER
214
READING AS AN ARTISTIC ACCOMPLISHMENT
221
STORIES FOR THIRD YEAR READING
229
Thumbelina
236
PLANS FOR TEACHING PRIMARY READING
243
THIRD WEEK
248
SECOND WEEK
254
FIRST Week
258
SECOND WEEK
259
FIRST WEEK
260
THIRD WEEK
261
FIRST Week
262
SECOND WEEK
263
SECOND WEEK
264
FOURTH WEEK
265
FOURTH WEEK
266
INCIDENTAL LANGUAGE
273
THIRD GRADE EXERCISES
282
STORIES
289
SUMMARY 263
296
RHYTHM AND RHYME
297
STUDY
304
TEACHING ENGLISH TO FOREIGNERS
312
Snowflakes
318
How the Thistle Saved Scotland
323
FIRST WEEK
331
c Third Day
332
c Third Day
333
Fourth WEEK
334
SECOND WEEK
335
FIRST WEEK
336
SECOND WEEK
337
THIRD WEEK
338
FIRST WEEK
339
FOURTH WEEK
340
THIRD WEEK
341
FOURTH Week
342
SECOND WEEK
343
SECOND WEEK
344
FOURTH WEEK
345
First WEEK
346
SECOND WEEK
347
THIRD WEEK
348
SECOND WEEK
349
THIRD WEEK
350
SECOND WEEK
360
THIRD WEEK
361
SECOND Week
362
Fourth WEEK
363
SECOND WEEK
364
FOURTH WEEK
365
SECOND WEEK
366
THIRD WEEK
367
FIRST WEEK
368
SECOND WEEK
369
FOURTH Week
370
INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT
371
How to SELECT STORIES FOR TELLING
373
SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF A Good Story
374
Realistic Stories
375
Myths
376
Nature Stories
377
TYPE OF STORY AND OUTLINE
379
OUTLINE OF THE STORY
385
Theme or Central Idea
386
STORY REPRODUCTION
388
METHOD
389
DRAMATIZATION 10 DRAMATIZATION EXPLAINED
391
DRAMATIZATION AS A MODE OF CLARIFYING IDEAS
392
First Grade 13 LIMITATIONS
392
USE OF DRAMATIZATION IN NATURE STUDY
395
Song In The Spring
396
Second Grade 16 BEST BASIS FOR This GRADE
398
Third Grade 19 GREATER CARE IN SELECTION
401
INCREASE IN STAGESETTING
402
BIBLIOGRAPHY
403
IMPORTANCE OF PLAYS AND Games
406
THE TEACHERS PLACE IN PLAY
411
HillDill
420
Hunt The Fox
427
ClassIFICATION
433
Lullabies
439
The Climber
441
Natures GoodNight
448
The Creation of the Birds
454
The Sleeping Beauty
460
To Light the Christ Child on His Way
466
PRELIMINARY EXERCISES
472
FURNITURE AND UTENSILS CHRISTMAS TREE ORNAMENTS
477
SPRING WORK
478
AUTUMN WORK
479
b Envelope
480
e Holder
481
b Cornucopias
482
Match SCRATCHER
483
EASTER EGGS
484
Second Year 22 INTRODUCTORY
485
SANTA CLAUS
486
POSES AND GAMES
487
PUMPKIN MASKS
488
b Cording
490
WOVEN HOLDER
491
SCREEN
492
SOLDIERS CAP
493
TABLE
495
Bed
496
BOOKS OF FLOWERS
497
WAGONS AND PARADO
498
ENVELOPE
501
THANKSGIVING DINNER CARDS
502
SLED
503
FLOWER Pot Cover
504
THE SQUARE Box 505
EASTER GREETINGS 506
MAY BASKET 507
c The Boat 509
b The ureau or Sideboard 509
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Page 234 - Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse; The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there.
Page 190 - Up the airy mountain Down the rushy glen, We daren't go a-hunting, For fear of little men; Wee folk, good folk, Trooping all together; Green jacket, red cap, And white owl's feather!
Page 137 - When he heard the owls at midnight, Hooting, laughing in the forest, "What is that?" he cried in terror; "What is that," he said, "Nokomis?" And the good Nokomis answered: "That is but the owl and owlet, Talking in their native language, Talking, scolding at each other.
Page 191 - They stole little Bridget For seven years long; When she came down again Her friends were all gone. They took her lightly back, Between the night and morrow; They thought that she was fast asleep, But she was dead with sorrow. They have kept her ever since Deep within the lake, On a bed of flag-leaves, Watching till she wake.
Page 135 - Saw the moon rise from the water Rippling, rounding from the water, Saw the flecks and shadows on it, Whispered, "What is that, Nokomis?" And the good Nokomis answered: "Once a warrior, very angry, Seized his grandmother, and threw her Up into the sky at midnight; Right against the moon he threw her; Tis her body that you see there." Saw the rainbow in the heaven, In the eastern sky, the rainbow, Whispered, "What is that, Nokomis?
Page 453 - THE snow had begun in the gloaming, And busily all the night Had been heaping field and highway With a silence deep and white. Every pine and fir and hemlock Wore ermine too dear for an earl, And the poorest twig on the elm-tree Was ridged inch deep with pearl.
Page 135 - Mudway-aushka!" said the water. Saw the fire-fly, Wah-wah-taysee, Flitting through the dusk of evening, With the twinkle of its candle Lighting up the brakes and bushes, And he sang the song of children, Sang the song Nokomis taught him: "Wah-wah-taysee, little fire-fly, Little, flitting, white-fire insect, Little, dancing, white-fire creature, Light me with your little candle, Ere upon my bed I lay me, Ere in sleep I close my eyelids!
Page 160 - HE golden-rod is yellow ; The corn is turning brown ; The trees in apple orchards With fruit are bending down. The gentian's bluest fringes Are curling in the sun ; In dusty pods the milkweed Its hidden silk has spun. The sedges flaunt their harvest, In every meadow nook ; And asters by the brook-side Make asters in the brook, From dewy lanes at morning The grapes' sweet odors rise ; At noon the roads all flutter With yellow butterflies.
Page 235 - He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot, And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot; A bundle of toys he had flung on his back, And he looked like a peddler just opening his pack.
Page 457 - And low eaves' icy fretting. It touched the tangled golden curls, And brown eyes full of grieving, Of one who still her steps delayed When all the school were leaving. For near her stood the little boy Her childish favor singled : His cap pulled low upon a face Where pride and shame were mingled.

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