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POETRY AND PROSE FOR SCHOOL-DAYS.

EDITED BY

BLANCHE WILDER BELLAMY

AND

MAUD WILDER GOODWIN.

Volume IFF.

ARRANGED FOR STUDENTS OVER FOURTEEN
YEARS OLD.

BOSTON, U.S.A.:

PUBLISHED BY GINN & COMPANY.

1897.

765.1684

Vol.HE.

Educ T 758.97.201

Harvard University,
Dept. of Education Library

TRANSFERRED TO

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY
1932

COPYRIGHT, 1890,

BY BLANCHE WILDER BELLAMY AND MAUD WILDER GOODWIN.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

TYPOGRAPHY BY J. S. CUSHING & Co., Boston, U.S.A.

PRESSWORK BY GINN & Co., BOSTON, U.S.A.

OPEN SESAME

IS DEDICATED TO

D. F. W. D.

PREFACE.

THE third volume of "OPEN SESAME: Poetry and Prose for School-days" completes the series, and represents many phases of literature, dramatic and narrative, epic and lyric, political and domestic.

Among the selections are many of the recognized masterpieces of the language; - Wordsworth's "Intimations of Immortality," called by Emerson "the highwater mark which the intellect of the age has reached"; "The Hymn before Sunrise in the Vale of Chamouni," which Coleridge admired so much as to appropriate and Anglicize it from the work of a German girl, and "Kubla Khan," his own dream; Blanco White's "Sonnet to Night," dear to Wordsworth's heart, and called by Coleridge the greatest sonnet in the English language; many specimens of Shakespeare and Milton, and fragments from Spenser, "the poet's poet."

Other selections have a secondary interest, like the "Lost Leader," of Browning, which, rumor says, hints at Wordsworth as a traitor to the Liberal cause; or the humorous-pathetic words of Jane Welsh Carlyle, which give a picture of genius at home, behind the doors of Craigenputtock; while boys will be interested to find the work of others young like themselves,—

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