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VOL. VII. - DECEMBER, 1861.--NO. XII.

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School Gymnastics......

353 Quarterly Report of Superintendent Leach... 376 Work......

355

EDITORS' DEPARTMENT. Vassar College-Female Education.... 356 The One Cent Contributivn.....An Important “ And in Prison.".. Wire Across a Continent. 358 Question....Live Teachers.............. 377 A Small School for Deaf Mutes...........cio 309 England.......

378 Elephant Hunting ....Unspoken Language.. 361

MATHEMATICE, Report on Intuitive Instruction...... 362 Teaching Arithmetic......

..... 379 Hawaiian Names.... Never Despair of an Un- QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN EXAMINATIONS.

ruly Boy.... A Quadrupedopolis......... 364 Grammar... Arithmetic... History Natural Musings on the Triennial ...

365 Philosophy....Geography.....Physiology Slang Phrases.... Music's Moral and Medici- and Book-keeping ....Spelling .......... 380 nal Influence....Object-Teaching ....... 367

PHILOLOGY.
The Military Element in School Discipline... 469 The Essays of A. K. H. B........
The Winter School.......
371 The Word “Way.”.

382 Spitting.......

372

NATURAL SCIENCE. Dignity and Universality of Music...... 373 Mineral Springs in the Vicinity of Pawtucket, 383 Babylonian Bank-Bills.......... 373 Camels in California......

384 EDUCATIONAL INTELLIGENCE. Animal Food........

384 Meeting of R. I. Institute of Instruction..... 374

BOOK TABLE.

384

.. 381

Providence Evening Press Establishment.

NO. 16 WEYBOSSET STREET, NEXT DOOR NORTH OF THE POST OFFICE, PROVIDENCE. COOKE & DANIELSON, proprietors of the above establishment, invite an increase of the favor already extended to them as the publishers of

1. THE PROVIDENCE EVENING PRESS, The largest daily newspaper in the State, and the only evening paper published in Rhode Island. It always has the latest telegraphic news, the same as contained in the Boston papers received in Providence several hours afterward. City and State intelligence will be found copiously set forth in fts columns. Its general news and miscellaneous interesting matter in great abundance give it an additional passport to, public favor. Its editorial conduct is strictly upon independent principles. Three editions of this handsomely printed journal are published daily.

THE EVENING Press is furnished to subscribers at the very low price of $6 per annum, payable in advance for any time desired. It is served in any part of the city at twelve cents per week, to such as prefer a weekly arrangement. Single copies, two ceñits each, may be procured at the office, at the news depots, and of the newsboys.

THE EVENING Press is a very valuable medium for adveriisers, and both yearly and transient advertisers will be dealt with liberally.

2. THE RHODE ISLAND PRESS, Which is equalled in size by only one other weekly Rhode Island paper, contains a very large amount of reading matter, and is suphlied to subscribers at the cheap rate of $1.50 per year, payable in advance. Ten copies will be sent to one address for a year for $10. Single numbers, three cents. Only a limited number of advertisements will be received for this paper, the rertisers in which will find their interest promoted by an arrangement with respect to it.

3. THE RHODE ISLAND SCHOOLMASTER.

BOOK AND JOB PRINTING, The Proprietors of this establishment confidently invite the patronage of the public in connection with their Book and Job Printing Department. They are prepared to execute all kinds of letter press printing with NEATNESS, CHEAPress and PrompTNESS. No pains will be spared to make it to the interest of their friends to transact business of this kind with them.

PROVIDENCE March, 1861.

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This Book contains a full discussion of all the essential principles of English Grammar, ánd is Intended to be

A COMPLETE TEXT-BOOK upon this subject.

Particular attention is invited to the logical and systematic treatment of "'Syntax"; the "Models for Construction,” and “ Models for Analysis"; the “Cautions" against adopting ungrammatical constructions, which also serve as guides in correcting false Syntax; and to the appended

ܪ

SYSTEM OF PUNCTUATION,

growing directly from the analysis of sentences, which will be found casy of application by any one who has studied the previous discussion of elements.

PROF. GREENE'S WORKS hate been long and favorably known to teachers and other friends of education throughout the United States, and it is believed that it will not be necessary to publish long lists of recommendations in order to obtain for this, his last and most carefully prepared book, an impartial examination.

TEACHERS AND SCHOOL OFFICERS will be furnished with copies for examination, by mail, on receipt of fifteen .cents to prepay postage, or they will be furnished free of expense on personal application to the Publishers, or to

DEXTER S. STONE, Boston, Mass., AGENT FOR INTRODUCTION - OFFICE AT CYRUS G. COOKE'S BOOKSTORE,

37 : 39 BRATTLE STREET. DECEMBER, 1861.

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Use the Best! Üse the Best!

NEW AND IMPROVED COPY BOOKS,

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POTTER & HAMMOND'S

Analytical and Progressive System of

PENMANSHIP
Is Based Upon the Most Scientific Principles,

Penmanship is really simplified and reduced to a Perfect Science, by a Careful Analysis of all the letters, and a Methodical Arrangement of the Copies. IT IS IN TWELVE PROGRESSIVE BOOKS. RETAIL PRICE OF EACH BOOK,

TEN CENTS, OR, ONE DOLLAR PER DOZEN. N. B.—The Publishers will promptly send, post-paid, a Specimen Dozen of the Copy Books, upon receipt of ONE DOLLAR. These books are made of the best Paper, and have po superior in any respect.

POTTER & HAMMOND'S

SYSTEM OF BOOK-KEEPING,

IN THREE NUMBERS. BY SINGLE AND DOUBLE ENTRY The first two numbers of this Series, comprising three sets of books, with 32 pages of beautifully engraved copies, designed as a continuation of their System of Penmanship; well adapted to higher classes in schools. Appropriate sets of Blanks accompany each set. No. 1 BOOK-KEEPING,.......

25 cents. 5 BLANKS FOR THE SAME,

20 No 2 BOOK-KEEPING,

35 4 BLANKS FOR THE SINGLE ENTRY SET IN No. 2.......

20 4 BLANKS FOR THE FIRST SET OF DOUBLE ENTRY, as found in No. 2...... 2) No. 3 BOOK-KEEPING......

... IN PRESS. Each set of Blanks contains, except the blanks for the bound edition, sufficient paper for rewriting a set of books in a practical manner from the printed transactions. Retail price for the first two numbers, bound together, boards, 65 cents; 5 Blanks for the same 25 cents.

Sent by mail on receipt of the price.

POTTER & HAMMOND'S STEEL PENS. EXTRA FINE, Per Gross,...

75 cents. SCHOOL PEN, Per Gross,..

65 These pens are manufactured by Joseph GịLLOTT, expressly to order, and are invariably pronounced the BEST PENS in the market. The Extra Fine Pen is adapted to schools of a higher grade, and is in every way equal to Gillott's 303. The School Pen is adapted to schools of an intermediate grade, and is an excellent BUSINESS PEN. Sent by mail on receipt of the price. SHERMERHORN, BANCROFT & Co., Publishers,

25 North Fourth Street, Philadelphia ; 596 Broadway, New York. 05t

JUST PUBLISHED:

SMITH'S NEW GEOGRAPHY Containing a Concise Text, and Explanatory Notes,

WITH OVER 100 MAPS,

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA.

BY ROSWELL C. SMITH, A. M., AUTHOR OF SEVERAL SCHOOL BOOKS...

..QUARTO. PRICE $1.00.

SMITH'S NEW GEOGRAPHY has been in course of preparationfor many years, and is the crown. ing production of the distinguished author. No pains have been spared to combine in this work ALL that is essential to a complete and comprehensire School Geography, and great care has been taken in its construction to render it of the greatest practical usefulness in the school-room and family.

The following are some of its features which deserve attention :

1. Clearness and comprehensiveness of expres- and terms. This feature is of great practical val. sion in the Text, especially in the Definitions; it ue to teachers, and intelligent scholars. being the aim of the author to teach the pupils

VI. Comparative Map on a uniform scale, exjust what they want to know, and in as few words hibiting the relative size of the different countries as practicable.

and larger Islands on the globe. fi. Superior colored Maps, exhibiting the Races, Religions, Governments, and states of Ci

VII. Railroad Map of the l'nited States, exhivilization of different nations.

biting the principal railway lines, with their con. 111. Forty-four Vicinity Maps of the Principal nections. Cities on the globe.

VIII. Physical Geography, with Humboldt's IV: Thirty-two large full-paged Maps of States System of Isothermal Lines. and Countries.

IX. Outline of Mathematical Geography. V. Copious Marginal Notes and Explanations, . X. Geographical Clock, exhibiting the relative giving the derivation and meaning of difficult words time of day under different degrees of Longitude.

FROM PROF. F. A. ALLEN, CHESTER County NORMAL SCHOOL. Messrs. J. B. LIPPINCOTT & Co. :

Dear Sirs :- Some time since, we placed in the hands of our advanced Teachers' Class a supply of Smith's New Geography, both for study and recitation, and for criticism; and the result of our experience with the work has been such as to satisfy us of its value and superiority as a text-book. It is without doubt the most comprehensive work of its size pow published, and sufficiently comprehensive to answer all the purposes of an advanced work for higher institutions.

An important and valuable feature in the work, and one to which the attention of teachers ought to be called, is the marginal notes and definitions. In these will be found answers to the thousand and one" questions asked by inquisitive pupils, such as-': Why are burning mountains called volcanoes ? " " Why are the great plains in North America called prairies or savannas, while in South America they are called pampas and llanos, in Europe heaths, and in Asia steppes ?

“ How are these words pronounced, and what do they mean?These and a host of similar questions, are answered and fully explained. Upon every page of the work this feature stands out.

The original small maps, exhibiting the Races, Religions, Governments, and states of Civilization, the Isothermal lines, Volcanic systems, etc., etc., together with the forty-four Vicinity Maps, and the thirty-two full-page Maps, are not surpassed by any other work extant.

The pages devoted to Ancient Geography, embracing Maps of the Roman Empire, and other noted places of antiquity, will prove a very acceptable feature to every teacher. The work is sufficiently full upon this point to give a clear and general knowledge of the subject. The department of Physical Geography is quite satisfactory. Enough is given to serve as an outline of the study.

Among the many excellent features in the work, we cannot fail to call the attention of all to the Comparative Map, on a uniform scale, as well as the Celestial Map and Diagrams. These, in connec, tion with the Geographical Clock, are matters of sufficient importance alone to commend the work.

The test to which we are daily submitting this work proves highly satisfactory to all concerned; and, thourb somewhat prejudiced against it at first, we are now fully convinced of its merits, an evidence of which is found in the fact that we have adopted it as our standard text-book in Geography. Very respectfully yours,

F. A. ALLEN,

Principal of C. C. N. School. FROM THE Mass. TEACHER. "All we have to say is, that this Geography is a novelty and a choice one too. If we had to select to-day a geographical text-book for our own use we should choose this."

TEACHERS will be furnished with copies of the work, in flexible covers, by mail, for examination jupon receipt of 25 cents in money or postage stamps, by the Publishers; and schools will be supplied with the work, for introduction, upon accommodating terms.

3. B: Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia,

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